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Archive => RFF Archived Boards => The Amazing Race => Topic started by: puddin on August 16, 2005, 08:10:15 AM

Title: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on August 16, 2005, 08:10:15 AM
(http://img340.imageshack.us/img340/5479/image780802x2ca.jpg)



 
(CBS) The latest edition of "The Amazing Race" kicks off in a few weeks with a twist. This time, says co-anchor Harry Smith on The Early Show, the mad dash around the globe is going to have a lot more competitors for the $1 million top prize.

It's being dubbed "The Amazing Race, Family Edition," and will feature 10 teams of four, instead of two. Each team will be made up of members of families.

Smith introduces them Tuesday.

First up is the Gaghan family, from Glastonbury, Conn. Nine-year-old Carissa sums up the family's competitive spirit when she says, "It's either you'll be a zero or you'll be a hero."

The Rogers family hails from Shreveport, La., and is used to competition and winning: Daughter Brittney is a former Miss Louisiana, USA.

No glitz or glamour for the Paolo family of Carmel, N.Y., just a desire to win, a little chaos, and a matriarch at the top, the Paolo mom, Marion. She says, "I think there's going to be a lot of personality clashes, but ultimately, Mommy screams the loudest and stomps her feet the hardest, so I might have the ultimate say."

Not all the teams consist of parents and their kids. Team Aiello, of Mansfield, Mass., is led by Tony, who's bringing along his sons-in-law. The guys agree the goal is to win, and not disappoint their father-in-law. "Oh, it's a great motivating factor!" exclaims one of the sons-in-law, Kevin Kempski.

The Linz family, three brothers and sister Megan, from Cincinnati, has a rallying cry ready to go: "Who dey, who dey, who dey think they gonna beat them Linzes? Nobody!"

The Schroeders, from New Orleans, say they have their own family language, which will give them an advantage. And they say they don't just want to win, they need to. "We've already been writing checks on that million dollars. If it doesn't come through, we're going upstate," says Mark Schroeder.

The Black family calls Woodbridge, Va
., home. The whole family competes in tae kwon do tournaments. For them, winning is all about unity. Says Reggie Black: "That's one of our slogans, 'Together, whatever!' "

When an accident killed their husband and father last year, the Weaver family of Ormond Beach, Fla., was nearly torn apart. They hope "The Amazing Race" will pull them back together. "I think this is going to help prove it to us," says Linda Weaver, "that we're still a strong family; we're still a unified, strong family."

It's girl power all the way for Tricia Godlewski and her sisters from Des Plaines, Ill. They describe themselves as smart, energetic and outgoing.

But they're not the only sisters in the race. Wally Bransen, of Park Ridge, Ill., has his daughters Lindsay, Lauren and Beth with him. He says, "The girls are just great personalities and great people. They have the ability to connect with all types of people. They're extremely outgoing."

Ten families, from across the country, from every walk of life; some old, some young; all focused; all ready to run the race of their lives.

You can catch the debut of "The Amazing Race, Family Edition" on Thursday, Sept. 15 on CBS.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/08/16/earlyshow/series/amazingrace/main780692_page2.shtml
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 16, 2005, 08:29:27 AM
(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/6f376b19.jpg)
One of 10 teams: Going for $1M are Reggie and Kimberly Black and sons Kenneth, left, and Austin, from Woodbridge, Va.
 
 
 Families compete in new 'Amazing Race'
By Gary Levin, USA TODAY
The Amazing Race is going family style.
 
 
 
The eighth season of CBS' late-blooming reality hit, due with a two-hour opener on Sept. 27 (9 p.m. ET/PT), introduces a new twist: Ten teams of four family members compete for a $1 million prize in a worldwide sprint.

Replacing the typical two-person teams, the Family Edition cast — to be unveiled today — includes two groups of grown-up siblings, a dad with three sons-in-law and a widow with her three teenage kids. Though many are adults, half of the teams have at least one contestant younger than 18, and one Virginia family includes brothers ages 11 and 8.

Which is not necessarily bad. "Kids have major advantages just by size," says executive producer Bertram van Munster. "They can climb through something with more agility, and they're very fast in a crowd."

CBS pushed the family concept as a new wrinkle for the series, which took three years to become a breakout hit, scored its best ratings last spring and has won two Emmys as best competition-reality show.

"I was scared," says casting director Lynne Spillman, who feared "duds" among family members or timid tykes. "But it was so much better than I ever thought. The people we ended up with were pretty adventurous and excited. From the kids' point of view, they were ready for anything."

Says van Munster: "Anytime you put a family of four together, you get interesting dynamics. It's a pretty humorous and explosive mix."

Initially, "it was great to see how well these people got along with each other" and offered help, even as they "finessed finding ways to mislead the other teams." Later, as the race got harder, teams became more "bitter" and clearly labeled certain rivals as enemies.

The kid-friendly contest, which includes fewer non-elimination episodes, did require certain concessions: Over the 30-day race, filmed mostly in July, teams traveled 30,000 miles, far less than the 72,000 traversed by teams on the sixth season. And more family-friendly, less-crowded locales were chosen.

After the starting line beneath New York's Brooklyn Bridge, the teams spend more time in U.S. cities where the focus is on historically significant sites.

Yet challenges are just as grueling, van Munster promises, and involve "miserable rain" and "extreme dry heat."

Fans will see just as many of those pesky "roadblocks" and "detours," while "yields," which force one team to stop racing for a period of time, "are more effective and more frustrating to people than (they've) ever been."
(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/db47cd3c.jpg) (http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/54c3b152.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/280f0050.jpg)
http://www.usatoday.com/life/television/news/2005-08-16-amazing-race_x.htm
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: FullMonte on August 16, 2005, 09:28:39 AM
Am I the only one who has a huge problem with the ages of these teams??

One team has it's two youngest members at 11 and 8....another has it's youngest two members at 31 and 26...How is that fair??
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: Pedaler on August 16, 2005, 09:54:12 AM
Thanks for the info, Puddin.

I am also surprised about the wide disparity of ages and potential capabilities.  However, last time I thought that Greg/Brian and Ray/Deana were going to be strong teams and look where they finished.

Even with the youngsters and non-exotic locations, I'm still looking forward to another great season.   
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: cinni on August 16, 2005, 10:07:32 AM
personally, i'm not liking the matching tie dyed shirts. but maybe that's just me.

i also don't like the very young kids running this time around too. i'm not looking forward to their philimination, sigh.
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 16, 2005, 10:57:13 AM
Finally some pictures

(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/5abce681.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/32fffcf3.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/36473ca1.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/e2765962.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/99c46fef.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/90bcd499.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/0987bd55.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/8702b9f6.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/c8b6261c.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/2f5ceda5.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/c5432138.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/3954eaa4.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/d4f97414.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/00a7e363.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/a052aafa.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/66b55518.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/23bde7db.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/5a2ee0ab.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/3b1fcfa4.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/2305c212.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/142a5a2f.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/3ace199c.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/fbf68c4a.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/5566b6a3.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/32b24867.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/4fa83241.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/525182fa.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/4051390b.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/85d3308b.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/5b096f4e.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/a779e6d3.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/ea4936a7.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/2c08b865.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/78d79f8d.jpg)
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 16, 2005, 10:58:30 AM
better yet my photo bucket if the pictures arent loading for you
http://photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/?start=20

and the realone video link  (http://video.cgi.cbsnews.com/video/video.pl?url=/media/2005/08/16/video780841.wmv&sid=207&dart=news.video4)
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: Mandoli on August 16, 2005, 11:32:18 AM
(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/99c46fef.jpg)(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/90bcd499.jpg)

Finally...Connecticut representives! {**} (Yes...state affiliation.)
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: Texan on August 16, 2005, 11:42:36 AM
Funny how some team jsut showed up in regular clothes and others in matchign shirts.

But I am with cinni on this one  and 8yr vs 20 something and older seems to be a littel disadvantage.  Also I am assumign they will not ahve the rule about who can do what roead blocks this time....surely you can not expect those under 15 to do the same things as the older ones.

I am nto sure this one will be so exciting.  Bigger taxis or just driving themselves more, keeping up with 4 people plus camera crew, plane tickets for that many CBS must just book the whole plane or there will be several flights.
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 16, 2005, 01:50:06 PM
Agree the older teams look so much more superior , the Gaughans and Black family just dont make me think "winners" .
Texan we think they cruised around North America in Vans ..probalby weeded out the weaker teams , then  spent some money for flights , and perhaps went to such places as CostaRica & Belize .
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: gingerman28 on August 16, 2005, 02:31:18 PM
At first look, none of these ten family groups seem to match any of the "spoiler" sightings reported to be seen iin July.
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 16, 2005, 11:09:49 PM
Total decoy runs Gman  :gman: (::)

Amazing Race," Family-Style
Tuesday August 16 7:43 PM ET

By Julie Keller



It's all in the family for The Amazing Race.

CBS has revealed the lineup of contestants for The Amazing Race: Family Edition, the latest incarnation of the two-time Emmy winning reality competition. This year, 10 four-member clans will trek around the world in a battle for $1 million. In the past, friends, lovers, spouses and/or coworkers have paired up, for better or worse, on two-person teams.

As they race around the globe, the four-person family teams will be pitted against each other in a series of mental and physical challenges, presumably testing the bonds of sibling-hood, parent-hood, couple-hood, in-law-hood and step-family-hood.

 
 
"Anytime you put a family of four together, you get interesting dynamics. It's a pretty humorous and explosive mix," executive producer Bertram van Munster tells USA Today.

Also new this year is the addition of younger competitors. This change meant some adjustments to the grueling Amazing Race schedule. First, there are fewer non-elimination episodes, and the teams only traveled about 30,000 miles total, less than half the 72,000 miles logged by contestants in season six. Less crowded competition sites were also chosen in deference to the kids.

Still, producers see the addition of children as a possible plus for the teams.

"Kids have major advantages just by size," says van Munster. "They can climb through something with more agility, and they're very fast in a crowd."

Plus, they're also, well, childish, so amusing playground antics are likely to ensue. Nine-year-old Carissa Gaghan from Glastonbury, Connecticut, threw down the gauntlet to on Tuesday's The Early Show, which introduced the competitors. "Either you'll be a zero or you'll be a hero," she told her fellow racers.

The family gimmick hopes to build on the show's record ratings last season. Fueled by the antics of Survivor couple Rob Mariano and Amber Brkich, the seventh installment of The Amazing Race averaged 12.5 million viewers a week. The show could also win its third straight Emmy in the Reality Competition category at next month's awards.


Here's a rundown of the teams:

Godlewski sisters from Des Plaines, Illinois: Michelle (42), Sharon (39), Christine (37) and Tricia (26)
Weaver family from Ormond Beach, Florida: widow Linda (46) and her three children, Rebecca (19), Rachel (16) and Rolly (14)
Gaghan family from Glastonbury, Connecticut: Bill (40), Tammy (42), Billy (12) and Carissa (9)
Black family from Woodbridge, Virginia: Reggie (42), Kim (40), Kenneth (11) and Austin (8)
Linz siblings from Cincinnati: Nick (24), Alex (22), Megan (21) and Tommy (19)
Rogers family of Shreveport, Louisiana: Denny (46), Renee (42), Brittney (22) and Brock (19)
Schroeder family from New Orleans: Mark (40), stepmom Char (39) and daughters Stassi (16) and Hunter (14)
Bransen family from Park Ridge, Illinois: dad Walter (51) and daughters Elizabeth (25), Lauren (22) and Lindsay (20)
Aiello family from Mansfield, Massachusetts: dad Tony (57) and sons-in-law Kevin (31), Matt ( 31) and David (26)
Paolo family of Carmel, New York: Tony (52), Marion (52), DJ (24) and Brian (16)
Hosted again by Phil Keoghan, The Amazing Race: Family Edition kicks off with a two-hour premiere Sept. 27 at 9 p.m.



http://tv.yahoo.com/news/eo/20050816/112424658000.html
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: gingerman28 on August 17, 2005, 09:11:39 AM
From some pretty reliable spoiler information posted on various boards since July 7 it now looks like all TEN teams make it to Huntsville, Alambama (NASA space camp?) at the end of which will be the FIRSTelimination. So that is going to be a douzzy of an opening show on September 27: New York, New Jersey, Washington, DC, South Carolina to Huntsville, Alabama!

From the descriptions and other pretty reliable sightings in Toronto and Montreal it looks like the four Godlewski Sisters make it that far (a team of four girls was spotted in downtown Toronoto) and either the Weavers or Bransens also make it to Montreal (team with adult and three children spotted but not further identified.)  Also it looks like the Black Family does not make it to the final five (all white familes supposedly spotted.)
Title: articles
Post by: puddin on August 17, 2005, 07:02:55 PM
People: Rhode Islander in Amazing Race, Madonna injured
 
09:09 AM EDT on Wednesday, August 17, 2005
 


A family based in Mansfield, Mass., that includes a Rhode Island police officer will be among the teams racing around the world on the upcoming season of the CBS reality show The Amazing Race.

 
CBS
(http://www.projo.com/yourlife/content/L_IMAGE.10543a66c1a.93.88.fa.7c.80e86aaf.jpg)
Tony Aiello, left, and Kevin, Matt and David, the husbands of three Aiello daughters, form a team on The Amazing Race: Family Edition.
The "Family Edition" of The Amazing Race begins with a two-hour episode on Sept. 27 at 9 p.m. and then airs Tuesdays from 9 to 10 p.m.

Tony Aiello, 57, a restaurant consultant, is teaming with his three sons-in-law, Kevin Kempskie, Matt Hanson and David Alverson.

Alverson, 26, is a former Marine and an officer in the Johnston Police Department. His CBS biography said he lives in North Providence.

Participants in The Amazing Race, like those on most reality shows, are not allowed to talk to anyone about the results of the program, which has already been filmed.

"We're all looking forward to seeing how he does, but everyone knows not to ask him anything," said Captain David DeCesare of the Johnston Police.

As for the other members of the Aiello team, a CBS spokesman said Kempskie, 31, works in public relations for a high-tech company. Hanson, also 31, is a corporate project manager.

Until now, The Amazing Race has featured teams of two racing around the world, performing various tasks along the way before they can receive instructions to their next destination. The final team to arrive at each designated rest stop faces elimination from the race.

The first team to make it all the way around the world wins $1 million.

This season, the show has decided to use family teams with four members each. Some of the teams include children as young as 8.

Aiello is the oldest participant in this season's race.
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 17, 2005, 07:04:39 PM
Anderson Township siblings join 'Amazing Race'

By John Kiesewetter
Enquirer staff writer

 
 
 CBS
 
(http://cmsimg.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=AB&Date=20050817&Category=ENT&ArtNo=508170320&Ref=AR&MaxW=300&MaxH=700&border=0)
The Linz family - Tommy (left), Megan, Alex and Nick - will compete for the $1 million top prize on "The Amazing Race: Family Edition" which kicks off its new season Sept. 27with a two-hour premiere.
 
 

Can the toughest of the tough from St. Xavier High School's football team win CBS' "The Amazing Race?"

Nick Linz, the Bombers' bruising fullback on the 1998 state runner-up team, and his young sister and brothers - Megan, Alex and Tommy - are one of 10 teams competing for $1 million on the reality show. It begins Sept. 27 (9 p.m., Channels 12, 7).

For the eighth version of the Emmy-winning series, teams were expanded from two people to four family members. Participants range in age from 8 to 57.

"Pound for pound, Nick was the toughest kid I've ever coached. You're not going to find someone who can compete harder than Nick," says Steve Specht, who coached Nick (class of 1999) and Alex (class of 2000) as a St. X assistant coach. Tommy graduated from St. X in 2004.

"The whole Linz family is tough as nails - but they're always smiling," Specht says.

CBS describes the Linz siblings as "well-traveled, athletic and very competitive."

The Linz children grew up in Anderson Township with parents Tom and Terri Linz, who could not be reached for comment. CBS prohibits participants from speaking to the media.

According to CBS, Megan and Tommy attend Miami University. Susan Vaughn, the judicial affairs director at the Oxford school, and her son, Patrick, competed in "The

Amazing Race" in the spring.

Here's how CBS describes the Linz team:

Nick, 24, works in sales in Buffalo, N.Y. He's "hardworking and friendly."

Alex, 22, a recent University of Cincinnati graduate, works as an emergency room technician. He's "optimistic and proud."

Megan, 21, a 2003 St. Ursula Academy grad, likes cheerleading and field hockey. "Although she's outnumbered by the boys, she and her brothers are very close," CBS says.

Tommy, 19, is a Miami business major and lacrosse team member. He's "willing and outgoing."

E-mail jkiesewetter@enquirer.com
http://news.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050817/ENT/508170320/-1/CINCI
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 17, 2005, 07:05:31 PM
`Amazing Race': It's all relatives

Published August 17, 2005


A widow and her three teenagers, a father and his sons-in-law and a handful of traditional nuclear families are set to showcase their skill at racing around the world and whatever dysfunction results from it.

CBS has revealed the identities of the 10 families, including one from Park Ridge and another from Des Plaines, competing in the next edition of "The Amazing Race." Unlike previous installments of the Emmy-winning show, which featured teams of two, the new version will have groups of four, all of whom are related in some way.

Otherwise, the game remains the same: The teams will race around the world, completing challenges on each leg and trying to stay out of last place. The winners get $1 million. Phil Keoghan returns as host.

For the first time minors will be involved as well. Several of the teams are made up entirely of adults--there are two groups of grown siblings, for instance--but there are a few kids in the mix.

"The Amazing Race: Family Edition" debuts Sept. 27.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0508170167aug17,1,1064625.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: gingerman28 on August 17, 2005, 10:01:41 PM
I like the way the news releases still talk about The Amazing Race as a "race AROUND the world" and "the first team to "race AROUND the world wins $1 million."

Either this is just a lot of  B:) B:) B:) or the producers have hidden the entire race from the prying eyes of the internet spoilers and the teams actually did race around the world.  Seeing will be believing!!
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 17, 2005, 10:13:48 PM
Gman   ]**]

The kid-friendly contest, which includes fewer non-elimination episodes, did require certain concessions: Over the 30-day race, filmed mostly in July, teams traveled 30,000 miles, far less than the 72,000 traversed by teams on the sixth season. And more family-friendly, less-crowded locales were chosen.
After the starting line beneath New York's Brooklyn Bridge, the teams spend more time in U.S. cities where the focus is on historically significant sites.

Yet challenges are just as grueling, van Munster promises, and involve "miserable rain" and "extreme dry heat."

Fans will see just as many of those pesky "roadblocks" and "detours," while "yields," which force one team to stop racing for a period of time, "are more effective and more frustrating to people than (they've) ever been
."
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 17, 2005, 10:36:11 PM
CBS UNVEILS THE IDENTITIES OF THE 10 FAMILIES COMPETING IN "THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION"
Released by CBS


CBS UNVEILS THE IDENTITIES OF THE 10 FAMILIES COMPETING IN "THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION"

Eighth Installment of the Emmy Award-Winning Series Begins With A Special Two-Hour Premiere on Tuesday, September 27, 9:00-11:00 PM, ET/PT

The Amazing Race: Family Edition Moves To Its Regular Tuesday, 9:00-10:00 PM Time Period Beginning October 4

CBS today announced the identities of the 10 families set to compete in THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION. For the first time ever, the Emmy Award-winning reality adventure series will feature teams of four instead of two, comprised of family members. The 10 teams of families will compete against one another in a race around the world for a $1 million prize. THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION will begin with a special two-hour premiere on Tuesday, Sept. 27 (9:00-11:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network.

THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION will be broadcast regularly on Tuesdays (9:00-10:00 PM, ET/PT) beginning Oct. 4.

THE AMAZING RACE has won two consecutive Emmy Awards for Best Reality Program is currently nominated for a third time.

Following are the 10 families, listed in no particular order:

TEAM: GODLEWSKI SISTERS

Michelle (42)
Sharon (39)
Christine (37)
Tricia (26)

Hometown: Des Plaines, Ill.

TEAM: WEAVER FAMILY (WIDOW AND KIDS)

Linda (46)
Rebecca (19)
Rachel (16)
Rolly (14) - Male

Hometown: Ormond Beach, Fla.

TEAM: GAGHAN FAMILY

Bill (40)
Tammy (42)
Billy (12)
Carissa (9)

Hometown: Glastonbury, Conn.

TEAM: BLACK FAMILY

Reggie (42)
Kim (40)
Kenneth (11)
Austin (8)

Hometown: Woodbridge, Va.

TEAM: LINZ FAMILY (SIBLINGS)

Nick (24) – Currently resides in Buffalo, N.Y.
Alex (22)
Megan (21)
Tommy (19)

Hometown: Cincinnati

TEAM: ROGERS FAMILY

Denny (46)
Renee (42)
Brittney (22)
Brock (19)

Hometown: Shreveport, La.

TEAM: SCHROEDER FAMILY (DAD, STEPMOM AND KIDS)

Mark (40)
Char (39)
Stassi (16)
Hunter (14)

Hometown: New Orleans

TEAM: BRANSEN FAMILY (DAD AND DAUGHTERS)

Walter (51)
Elizabeth (25)
Lauren (22)
Lindsay (20)

Hometown: Park Ridge, Ill.

TEAM: AIELLO FAMILY (FATHER AND SONS-IN-LAW)

Tony (57)
Kevin (31)
Matt ( 31)
David (26) – Currently resides in North Providence, R.I.

Hometown: Mansfield, Mass.

TEAM: PAOLO FAMILY

Tony (52)
Marion (52)
DJ (24) - Male
Brian (16)

Hometown: Carmel, N.Y.

THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION features 10 teams -- each comprised of four family members -- on a trek around the world for approximately 30 days. At every destination, each team will have to compete in a series of challenges -- some mental and some physical -- and only when the tasks have been completed will they learn their next destination. Teams who are farthest behind will gradually be eliminated as the contest progresses, with the first team to arrive at the final destination winning $1 million.

Jerry Bruckheimer, Bertram van Munster, Jonathan Littman and Hayma Screech Washington are the executive producers for Bruckheimer Television and Earthview Inc. in association with Touchstone Television and Amazing Race Productions. Amy Chacon and Evan Weinstein are co-executive producers. THE AMAZING RACE was created by Bertram van Munster and Elise Doganieri.

For more information on THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION and the new 10 teams of families log on to www.cbs.com.

http://www.thefutoncritic.com/cgi/pr.cgi?&id=20050816cbs02
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: Nuala on August 17, 2005, 11:29:05 PM
The Blacks are from Va.  Cool.  Now VA will get some more representation on a reality show.  They have the youngest members on their team.  I wonder how the babes held up in the race?  I think this is going to be very interesting to watch.  I only watched one episode last year and could not get into it.  But the whole family thing is pretty neat, so I will give it a try again.
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 17, 2005, 11:48:01 PM
This is my FAV show Nuala, I hope you hang out with us for the season  ]**]
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: Texan on August 18, 2005, 01:45:58 PM
I hope alot of the guest here for BIG Brother will come and post with us for TAR!!
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: Trevor on August 18, 2005, 03:14:51 PM
In just looking at the teams and their ages, you would have to think the Linz family has a great shot considering their ages.  That being said, they could all be dumb as rocks and get lost trying to find the Empire State Building while standing on 34th street.
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 18, 2005, 04:22:15 PM
LOL Trevor  {l{
The Accidental Columnist
The Amazing Race 8 - The Teams
By Dan Weltin
Published: August 17, 2005   Print this article 

 
After a much needed break, The Amazing Race 8 is ready to show the TV audience why it's an Emmy-award winning show. And this season there's a special twist! It's Family Edition (groan).

This season 10 teams of four (instead of the usual 11 teams of two) will embark on a race around the world for the million-dollar prize. But according to a USA Today article, teams are only travelling 30,000 miles, a far cry from the standard 72,000. Because kids are involved, more historically significant locales were chosen and a majority of the race is within U.S. cites (that doesn't sound very amazing). The locations are also more family friendly and less crowded.

For some reason there will be fewer non-elimination legs this season as well. TAR 8 premieres on CBS on September 27 at 9 p.m. ET/PT and 8 p.m. Central.

Until then, let's take a look at the teams:

Gaghan Family:

Bill is 40-year-old dad with a lack of patience. Wife Tammy is 42 (ooh, older woman, kinky) lived in Korea for three years so the family has traveled a lot and both parents run in marathons (yeah, but your kids don't.) Speaking of the kids, Billy is 12 and athletic, but also in his pre-teen mood swings. Little Carissa is 9 and described as silly. (That's not going to help them win anything). Look for the teams with young children to be eliminated early. These guys don't stand a chance unless they have Barbie or Lego challenges.


Schroeder Family:

Mark is another 40-year-old dad and his two kids come from a previous marriage. Char is 39 and is described as the mediator of the family. It sounds like she has her work cut out for her because Stassi is 17 and the queen (read spoiled to all hell) of the family, while Hunter, 15, has been called lazy by his teammates.


Aiello Family:

Tony is 57 and travelling with his three sons-in-law. Kevin and Matt are both 31 and each married to one of Tony's twin daughters. David, 26, is a police officer and an ex-marine. With no wives on board and Mr. Military, expect these guys to kick some serious butt.


Rogers Family:

Patriarch of the family Denny is 46 and in the car business. Renee is 42 and a beauty pageant trainer. No wonder their daughter Britteny, 22, is a former Miss Louisiana (man, TAR really has a soft spot for beauty pageant winners. Can there not be a race without one?). Son Brock, 19, is said to have little patience.


Black Family:

Reggie, 42, is the team leader (though we all know from watching The Office that it's a meaningless title). Kimberly, 40, says she's witty (hopefully its dry). At eight years old, Austin is the youngest contestant ever on TAR, and he and his 11-year-old brother Kenneth are both into Tae Kwon Do. The family has little travelling experience, but a lot of heart. (Hey, heart counts for something. After all, it was Captain Planet's fifth power.)


Weaver Family:

Linda, 46, lost her husband in an accident at Daytona International Speedway (no he wasn't a driver). She's travelling with her three kids: Rebecca, 19, Rachel, 16, and Rolly (that's a lot of r's) who is 14 (and hopefully won't go crazy with travelling with three women). The team is dedicating their run to dear ol' dad.


Linz Family:

This team consists of three brothers: Nick, 24, Alex, 22, and Tommy, 19, who are travelling with their sister Megan, 21. With no parents it could be a blessing or a curse. Either the team will be great without having a nagging mom or dad around, or the four siblings may run wild due to lack of discipline. If they can hold it together, the Linz's will be tough to beat.


Bransen Family:

It's a man and his daughters. Their claim to fame is that they once appeared in a Pert shampoo commercial (whoopee). Dad Walter is 51 and belongs to the Abraham Lincoln Association and is a whiz on all things Honest Abe. With an emphasis on historical sites this season, this talent could come in handy. Elizabeth, 25, has a fear of heights and is stubborn like her father (two stubborn people spells trouble). Lauren, 22, is punctual (how does that help? Is she going to be on time for the finish line?). Lindsey, 20, complains that her sisters tell her what to do. Hopefully dad rules the roost and can keep his daughters in line.


Paolo Family:

This family is known for their bickering. Father Tony is 52 and originally from Italy. Mother Marion, also 52, says Tony lets his sons get away with too much. As for the sons, 16-year-old Brian is embarrassed by his family, and both he and his 24-year-old brother DJ think that their mother won't last very long. (Such confidence!). No wonder they don't get along.


Godlewski Family:

It's four sisters each with her own personality. They're like the Care Bears or something. Michelle, 42, is the competitive one. Sharon, 39, is the personable one. Christine, 37, is the obsessive one. And Tricia, 26, is the peacemaker. They all live within 30 minutes of each other and have traveled together. (Remember, that doesn't necessarily mean they get along though).




http://www.the-trades.com/column.php?columnid=3472
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: Nuala on August 18, 2005, 06:13:00 PM
This is my FAV show Nuala, I hope you hang out with us for the season  ]**]

I will be here.  I am glad you all are such a welcoming family.  There are so many people coming on board and it nice to see a pleasant forum where people can agree to disagree.
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: gingerman28 on August 18, 2005, 09:37:22 PM
Puddin: :<(

To quote from your post of yesterday:

"CBS today announced the identities of the 10 families set to compete in THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION. For the first time ever, the Emmy Award-winning reality adventure series will feature teams of four instead of two, comprised of family members. The 10 teams of families will compete against one another in a race around the world for a $1 million prize.

and....

"THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION features 10 teams -- each comprised of four family members -- on a trek around the world for approximately 30 days."

and...

30,000 miles would take you around the world at least once at the equator (twice at the Artic Circle) And this is an awful lot of miles to run up just by travelling from the East Coast to the West Coast and back (About 7,000 miles; oh well make that 10,000 if they go South and North also) We have had suposedly sightings in Beliz and Panama. Still that would not account for a total of 30,000 miles. So were they able to sneak away and actually travel around the world more or less on a straight line from Panama to Europe to Asia and back to Jackson Hole, Wyoming and then on to Toronto and Montreal??????

"
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: gingerman28 on August 19, 2005, 02:16:17 PM
I have been puffing and puffing on my pipe and the "arouand the world" quote that keeps coming up has me thinking.  Also the grand total of only 30,000 miles also has me puzzled. But as Sherlock said to the good doctor: Its elementary.  So here is the pipe dreams to beat all pipe dreams (and , Puddin, please don't ask what I have been smoking in my pipe)

This is my wildest guess of where TAR8 goes:

Leg One.    New York to Washington, DC                    205 miles
                 Washington DC to Charleston, SC               447 miles
                 Charleston,SC to Huntsville, AL                   404 miles

Leg Two    Huntsville, AL to Taladega, AL                       95 miles
                Taladega, AL to Beliz City, Beliz                   1109 miles

Leg Three   Beliz City to Panama City, Panama                 827 miles

Leg Four    Panama City to Wellington, NZ                      7447 miles

Leg Five    Wellington,NZ to Sydney, AUS                      1384 miles

Leg Six     Sydney, AUS to Manila, PI                              3898 miles

Leg Seven Manila, PI to Honolulu, HI                              5304 miles

Leg Eight   Honolulu, HI to San Francisco, CA                  2395 miles

Leg Nine    San Francisco, CA to Jackson, WY                  732 miles

Leg Ten     Jackson, WY to Toronto, Canada                  1557 miles (note may be included in Leg nine)

Leg Eleven     Toronto to Montreal                                  314 miles
                    Montreal to New York, NY                         320 miles

This gives us a total of                                                             26, 438 miles

Locations are selected for English speaking ability. English is the primary language in Beliz, Panama and The Philippines

There probably is local travel in and around these locations which would account for an additional 3,600 miles

If there are the usual 13 legs, then some locations may include more than one leg.

As I said this is a pure pipe dream.
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 19, 2005, 02:29:32 PM
 :<( Gman ..I havent had time to put the spoilers together , if you want a go at it please do so  :kuss:
if not I'll have to make sometime, the BB6 updates is killing me .

Time to swipe stuff from the other board again   {l{ . ( thanks to greenraven@sucks )

Quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Just returned from my cousin's wedding in New Orleans and in speaking with my other cousin at the family brunch, our conversation turned to TAR. She asked if I was still a fan, and informed me that one of the bridesmaids' boss (she works at The Ritz Carlton in N.O., as does he) had just gotten back recently with his family from filming the new TAR: Family Edition. The bridesmaid didn't have any other info outside of that/her boss didn't tell her much more, but look for a southern New Orleans family in the next race. Just a heads-up.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

They followed this post with one allegedly from the said N.O. hotel guy Racer posting on some board called Datalounge and added the board isn't the most reliable:


Quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'm Going to Be on The Amazing Race with my family in September. We just got back (that's no spoiler, because even teams eliminated early go into sequester/decoy mode). The season should start in September. I'm the hotel manager from New Orleans. Can't really say much more, except I had some slight disappointment in the fact that this race took place mainly in North America. But that's understandable because some teams had children as young as 7 with them.

Well, hope you guys watch!!!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: gingerman28 on August 21, 2005, 05:58:07 PM
According to CBS the only family from New Orleans is the Schroeder Family.  And he is identified as an architect not a hotel manager. So who is this guy claiming that he is a Hotel Manager (Ritz Carlton) not an architect.  Is someone just posting to get his own kicks from Route 66? So claiming that the race took place "mainly in North America" still leaves some overseas travelling - Belize, Panama, and Canada are all still in North America as is the USofA, of course. Until more is proven rialable I would not take anything from this source as gospel
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 21, 2005, 08:15:41 PM
GMan , credits to twop's

 
PRESS RELEASE
 
New Orleans - Proud to Call It Home for the Night

For additional information about this press release contact:

Char Schroeder
Director of Public Relations
The Ritz-Carlton, New Orleans
921 Canal Street
New Orleans, LA 70112
USA
Phone: (504) 524-1331
Fax: (504) 670-2863
char.schroeder@ritzcarlton.com
 


http://www.ritzcarlton.com/hotels/new_orleans/overview/pressreleases/proud_to_call_it_home.html


(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/BB6_Album_10/ec0bb7d5.jpg)
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 21, 2005, 10:24:19 PM
3 more Linzes wanted to be in 'Amazing Race'

By John Kiesewetter
Enquirer staff writer

 
(http://cmsimg.enquirer.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=AB&Date=20050821&Category=ENT&ArtNo=508210356&Ref=AR&Profile=1025&MaxW=600&title=1)
 
The Linz family is (from left) Tim, Travis, Alex, mom Terri, Megan, Liz, Matt, Nick, Tommy and dad Tom. Nick, Alex, Megan and Tommy (aka "Bone") will be on the TV show, starting Sept. 27.
 
 

 
When CBS announced "The Amazing Race" cast for fall, the phone began ringing at the home of Tom and Terri Linz in Anderson Township. Four of the seven Linz kids had just finished taping the $1 million, around-the-world TV competition (premiering 9 p.m. Sept. 27, Channels 12, 7).

Terri Linz, 52, a part-time nurse at Clermont Mercy Hospital, is the official spokeswoman for her children.

Nick, 24, Alex, 23, Megan, 21, and Tommy (aka "Bone"), 19, are prohibited by CBS from talking to the media. Terri says Matt, 27, Travis ("TJ"), 25, and Tim, 16, wanted to go, but CBS would take only four-person teams for the first "Amazing Race" family version.

How they got involved: A casting director saw the whole family in a Cancun airport, while we were on a Christmas vacation, and asked if we ever thought of being on a reality show.

Four from seven: Matt and his wife, Liz, couldn't go because she was expecting a baby, our first grandchild (born Aug. 11). TJ is working in Chicago, and Nick's schedule was more flexible working for his father's company (Packstar) in Buffalo. Tim, a junior at St. Xavier, showed an interest, but he had to attend to some academics. He was dismayed.

Love those Bengals: They wore orange shirts with "Who Dey" on them (on the show). They are intense Bengals fans. They're the "Who Dey" team all the way. They're bringing "Who Dey" to the nation.

How "Bone" got his name: Everyone at CBS asked that. When he was little, he was a bald kid. Everyone always knew him as "Bone." It was on the back of his soccer and football jerseys.

Her lips were sealed: Oh my gosh, it was hard keeping this secret. But we did a good job covering it up. We made a list of all the people we told fibs to and had to tell them the truth.

Favorite reality show: I'm not an avid TV watcher. I don't have enough time, raising seven children. Of what I've heard and seen, this one sounds like a good wholesome show.

In the dark: I don't know where they went, or what they've done, since the beginning of July (when filming began). My kids aren't sharing any secrets with mom and dad, and I don't want to know. They've made statements that they think put Cincinnati on the map."

Proud mom: God has blessed me with really good kids. They're good, healthy, happy and not in trouble, as much as I know.

Big family: My husband is one of 11 children. His father has 47 grandchildren. My mother has 16 grandchildren. So my kids have over 50 first cousins. It's pretty crazy.

Being national TV stars: My boys want it made clear they don't have any significant others in their lives. They are single gentlemen.

E-mail jkiesewetter@enquirer .com
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050821/ENT/508210356/1025/LIFE
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: Slowhatch on August 21, 2005, 10:42:21 PM
Quote
How they got involved: A casting director saw the whole family in a Cancun airport, while we were on a Christmas vacation, and asked if we ever thought of being on a reality show.

Nice catch, Puddin. That's the first "cast" team I've seen; I wonder how many others are left. I forget when applications for TAR8 were first announced, but now we know they were thinking about casting it at least since December '04.
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 21, 2005, 10:54:04 PM
You have the good eyes Slowhatch ..I read it so fast that I didn't catch it  :t-up:
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 25, 2005, 03:42:34 PM
more on the teams



'The Amazing Race''s Family Edition
 
 RELATED VIDEO
•  VIDEO 1  •  VIDEO 2 
•  VIDEO 3   (http://et.tv.yahoo.com/micro/falltv/etsid189190012308/)
 
 
 
"The Amazing Race" will begin its next 30-day trek around the world on Sept. 27 on CBS, when the Racers queue up at the starting line for another exciting competition. This time out the 10 teams won't be taking off in pairs, but foursomes, with the new twist that they all must be family members.

PHIL KEOGHAN is back as host for the eighth installment of the hit CBS reality series, which premieres with a two-hour special (9-11 p.m.). As before, each team will still face a series of challenges, mental and physical, as they make their way to the final destination and the $1 million grand prize.

This season's Racers are:

GODLEWSKI SISTERS

These four sisters -- MICHELLE, 42; SHARON, 39; CHRISTINE, 37; TRICIA, 26 -- hail from Des Plains, IL, where they all live within 30 minutes of each other. They have traveled together before, but not with the challenges "The Amazing Race" presents each week.

WEAVER FAMILY

Mom LINDA, 46; daughters REBECCA, 19; and RACHEL, 16; and son ROLLY, 14, from Ormond Beach, FL, all suffered a tragic loss close to two years ago when Linda's husband and the kids' father was killed in an accident at the Daytona International Speedway. The Weavers are looking for the competition to bring them some happy new memories.

GAGHAN FAMILY

From Glastonbury, CT, the Gaghans -- father BILL, 40; mother TAMMY, 42; and kids BILLY,12; and CARISSA, 9 -- are looking to "The Amazing Race" to teach them how to work together. Mom and Dad may be at a bit of an advantage because they are both marathon runners.

BLACK FAMILY

The Blacks -- REGGIE, 42; KIM, 40; and kids KENNETH, 11; and AUSTIN, 8 -- from Woodbridge, VA, are used to competition. Reggie and Kim are teachers, while Kenneth and Austin compete in Tae Kwan Do tournaments. Austin is the youngest ever competitor in "The Amazing Race."

LINZ SIBLINGS

Cincinnati is the hometown of the Linz family -- NICK, 24; ALEX, 22; MEGAN, 21; TOMMY, 19. The three brothers and one sister hope their close relationship will take them to the finals and into the money.

ROGERS FAMILY

From Shreveport, LA, Team Rogers is comprised of dad DENNY, 46; mom RENEE,42; daughter BRITTNEY, 22; and son BROCK, 19. Denny says their motto for the "Race" is, "We never enter anything unless we intend to win."

SCHROEDER FAMILY

The Schroeders are MARK, 40; and CHAR, 39; and Mark's children from a previous marriage -- STASSI, 17; HUNTER, 15. From New Orleans, these Southerners are well-traveled and ready to go!

BRANSEN FAMILY

This dad -- WALTER, 51 -- with his three delightful daughters -- ELIZABETH, 25; LAUREN, 22; LINDSAY, 20 -- hail from Park Ridge, IL. If they look familiar, it is because they once appeared in a Pert shampoo commercial, but don't expect their journey to be smooth sailing. Several of the members admit to being impatient -- and Lindsay says her oldest sisters are bossy.

AIELLO FAMILY

TONY, 57, from Mansfield, MA, will be racing around the world with his three sons-in-law -- KEVIN, 31; MATT, 31; DAVID 26. This will be the first time these four have traveled together without their wives!

PAOLO FAMILY

The bickering Paolo family -- dad TONY, 52; mom MARION, 52; and sons DJ, 24; BRIAN, 16 -- hail from Carmel, NY. Will they be able to put aside their differences for a smooth "Race"? Tune in.
 
 
Title: Re: 'Amazing Race 8': A Family Affair
Post by: puddin on August 25, 2005, 06:44:16 PM
Carmel family to compete in The Amazing Race on CBS
By: Eric Gross

 Carmel family has been selected to compete in "The Amazing Race: Family Edition" that kicks off next month on CBS television.

The Emmy-winning reality program will feature four members from nine individual families who will travel around the world by competing against each other for a $1 million grand prize.

Anthony Paolo, his wife, Marion, and the couple's two sons, DJ, 24 and 16-year-old Brian, will be representing Putnam County on the program.

When contacted at her home last week, Marion Paolo said the television network had forbidden contestants from discussing the show with any representatives of the media.

An official at CBS told the Putnam Courier each family had a "family spokesperson. Once the contestants either win or are out of the running for the grand prize, they will be able to discuss their experiences with anyone they like."

Judy Racic, a neighbor of the Paolos, has been designated to speak on the family's behalf.

"They are the best. I've known them for the past 10 year, but I feel as though I've known them for all my life. They are caring, concerned and hard-working people. They always extend themselves and are all exceptional," said Racic.

Anthony Paolo, who emigrated from Italy, is a sanitation worker in New York City. Marion is a housewife, who cares for her elderly mother. DJ is employed by a title company and Brian is a student at Carmel High School.

"They are probably the most warm and caring family I've ever encountered. I'm really proud to call myself their friend and neighbor and, of course, I wish them good luck in the Amazing Race," said Racic.

Other families competing against the Carmel clan include a brother-sister combo from Buffalo, a father and his three daughters from Illinois, a father, step-mother and their children, and a team of four sisters.

CBS said the oldest family member competing on the show is 57 while the youngest is an 8-year-old from Virginia.

"The Amazing Race: Family Edition" premieres Sept. 27 on CBS from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=15094509&BRD=1708&PAG=461&dept_id=72445&rfi=6
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: gingerman28 on August 25, 2005, 09:27:21 PM
There it is again: "30-day trek around the world"

So they must be going to other places outside of North America (USofA; Belize, Costa Rica (?), Panama and Canada. And we have accounted for only 6,000 miles so far, so there still remain another 24,000 and two weeks of travel time to account for.
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on August 25, 2005, 09:43:56 PM
 |#' Still some hope for us that love to spoil the locations GMan  ;)
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on August 27, 2005, 12:40:06 PM
Family competes on Amazing Race


By EMILY BROWN
ebrown@potomacnews.com
Saturday, August 27, 2005


It's hard to pack for vacation when no one in the family knows where they're going, how long they'll be there and what they'll do.

The Black family of Woodbridge - Reggie and Kimberly, and their children Kenneth and Austin - faced that dilemma with the hopes of winning a $1 million prize at the end of a 30-day intercontinental race.

For the second season in a row, Prince William County locals competed in "The Amazing Race," CBS's traveling scavenger hunt reality show.

The Blacks' television debut airs Sept. 27 at 9 p.m. on the show's eighth edition, one rearranged to include teams of four related persons, instead of two people with any combination of relationship.

In season seven, which aired in March, Woodbridge High School teacher and Lake Ridge native Bianca Smith and her childhood friend, Debbie Cloyed, formerly of Lake Ridge, raced around the globe. Their travels were cut short when they were eliminated in the third episode.

Like other seasons, the Blacks raced around the world toward a finish line. At every destination teams compete in a series of challenges, some mental and some physical. When tasks are completed, they learn their next destination. Teams that are farthest behind are gradually eliminated as the contest continues. The first team to arrive at the final destination wins the prize money.

The Blacks competed against nine other families in the race, taped this summer. Contracts with CBS forbid any of the participants to speak with members of the press until they are eliminated from the show or have won the prize.

Austin, 8, is the youngest person to ever compete in the race. While other teams have children, most are grown.

Other teams include all siblings, step-parents and in-laws.

Reggie, 42, serves as the team leader and taught math at Hylton High School from 2000 to 2004.

Amanda Jewell, 19, of Woodbridge had him for Algebra and trigonometry during her junior year at Hylton. She described him as laid back and personable, but strong willed.

"When it was time to get the job done, he got the job done," she said.

Her teacher was a student favorite, she said, and always looked forward.

"He would never give up on a student, so I know he would put that toward his kids and his family," she said.

Kimberly, 40, is a fifth-grade teacher in the city of Alexandria who describes herself in her show biography as witty and determined. She and Reggie met as students at Norfolk State University. Kimberly also has a master's degree in education from Marymount University.

Whatever the task, this family works as a unit, said Gisele Estrada, a family friend.

"They're very supportive of one another, and they communicate that to each other," Estrada said. Reggie and Kimberly's background as teachers led to effective listening and communicating skills, she said.

The family is competitive, she said, but not "cutthroat." They work together to achieve goals, and talk about what went wrong if the goal wasn't reached, she said.

The entire family participates in Tae Kwon Do. Reggie and Kimberly take adult Tae Kwon Do classes as well as participate in classes with their children.

Kenneth, 11, is entering sixth grade and earned a black belt two years ago. Austin will enter fourth grade this year. He has an advanced brown belt. The boys also compete in soccer and swimming.

Both boys are smart and studious, said Estrada, who has a son of the same age as Kenneth.

"They are so competitive and they love to get their hands in [things]," she said.

Though the Blacks don't claim to be as well traveled as other teams, Estrada thinks it will motivate them.

"It will drive Kenneth and Austin to do the best they can," she said.

Brenda Bumbrey, an office assistant at Hylton, said she wasn't surprised her former co-worker went on the show.

"He's a go-getter when it comes to a dollar bill," she said. Reggie would often teach summer school and night school to make extra money.

"He's always trying to make his family as comfortable as possible," she said.

http://www.potomacnews.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WPN%2FMGArticle%2FWPN_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031784701313&path=
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on August 29, 2005, 01:31:39 PM
August 29, 2005
Amazing Race 8 Contestant Linda Weaver Sues The Daytona International Speedway
The Weaver family from Ormond Beach, Florida is one of the families competing on Amazing Race 8.  The Weaver family consists of Linda Weaver, a 46 year-old mom, and her three children; Rebecca (19), Rachel (16), and Rolly (14).  Linda’s husband and the children’s father, Roy Weaver was killed nearly two years ago in an accident at the Daytona International Speedway
According to the Cup Scene Daily, Roy Weaver was a track crew supervisor at the Daytona International Speedway.  Roy Weaver was trying to clear debris from the track when he was hit by a race car traveling at over 100 mph that was being driven by Ray Paprota.  Paprota is a paraplegic race car driver, but an investigation into the crash determined that “the fact that Paprota is paralyzed from the waist down wasn’t a factor in the crash.”

The News-Journal of Daytona Beach, Florida reports that Linda Weaver has recently filed a lawsuit against the Daytona International Speedway and others over her husband’s death.  The lawsuit claims that the “track lacked adequate safety procedures and the driver who struck him was traveling too fast.”  The lawsuit also alleges that officials did not immediately stop the race and drivers continued to “strike, drive over, desecrate and mutilate" her husband’s body.  According to the News-Journal the lawsuit “seeks an unspecified amount of damages in excess of $75,000.”

The official CBS Bio for the Weaver family notes that Linda Weaver “is hoping her experiences on The Amazing Race will alleviate some of the heartache from the last couple of years.”  The CBS Bio also states “All three children and their mother have dealt with their loss in their own distinct ways and are looking forward to the experience of traveling and competing together as a family.”

Reality TV Magazine is your source for Amazing Race news.  For other great Amazing Race news, please also check out SirLinksALot: Amazing Race.
http://www.realitytvmagazine.com/blog/2005/08/amazing_race_8_.html
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on August 30, 2005, 05:42:21 PM
Meet the Cast: The Amazing Race
Posted by teletart on August 29, 2005 08:44 PM (See all posts by teletart)

 
In which your hostess, teletart, indulgues in shallow conjecture, based entirely on pictures and those snappy little bios on network websites. Because snide shallow conjecture is what reality TV is all about!



http://blogcritics.org/archives/2005/08/29/204457.php
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on August 31, 2005, 02:45:12 PM
Scanned from my TvGuide wk Sept4 /10

(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/2333689f.jpg)
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: Slowhatch on August 31, 2005, 11:19:09 PM
I wonder what's become of the Schroeders. I don't like much of what I've read about them pre-race, but it's hard not to feel sympathy with a family whose home and livelihood are all underwater.
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on August 31, 2005, 11:48:28 PM
 :sad: No kidding Slowhatch ..God speed  and sending thoughts & prayers .
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 01, 2005, 01:55:30 PM
"Amazing" family
By HEATHER SALERNO
hsalerno@thejournalnews.com
THE JOURNAL NEWS

Carmel High School senior Brian Paolo has his classmates beat when they start trading summertime stories: He and his family are among the adventurers competing on CBS's "The Amazing Race" this fall.

 More on the article here ~ ;)

http://www.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050901/LIFESTYLE01/509010412/1031/LIFESTYLE01
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: teletart on September 06, 2005, 01:39:31 AM
I appreciate that you've cut and paste my writing from blogcritics Puddin,  :))  though I'm not sure how they'd feel about the entire article being reposted.  Isn't it just as easy to provide a teaser and a link?  Anyhoo, copyright fun n' games aside, feel free to check out my blog, where this post originally appeared - and where there's lots more speculation about TAR and other shows:  http://longplastichallway.blogspot.com

xx teletart
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: gingerman28 on September 06, 2005, 09:29:35 AM
I wonder if TV Guide will feature the other seven families in the three weeks to come or is there some special significance in the choice of the the Aiellos, Schroeders and Gaghans?

And there is certainly a lot being published PRE-RACE this time around. A lot of local newspapers seem to be getting to the various families and I wonder how tight-lipped they really are?  I can just see some 8 or 9 year old keeping quiet about "what I did last summer" when they return to school.
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 06, 2005, 10:48:49 AM
teletart  :)* , sorry . But ,  I'm glad that you find us and yes , I am checking out your Blog as I type this , Thank you and Welcome
 xx puddin .

I'm with you on this idea GMan ..some kid is probably  :':') because their family didn't win, soon they will be  B:) B:) to their friends & classmates ..its only a matter of time . But where to look ?

Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 07, 2005, 07:08:49 PM
Hey teletart , I get Google news alerts for TAR and your name popped up again  ;)

"The Amazing Race": Handicapping Season 8
I was so busy handicapping the race to see who would be selected to compete in the ninth season of the CBS reality show “The Amazing Race” that I didn’t notice that the network has announced the teams for the upcoming eighth season, which premieres September 27 at 9 p.m. The hit show, which usually features teams of two in a frantic race around the world, will feature four-person families this time around. I’m not going to handicap the competition for this season, but teletart at blogcritics.org (http://blogcritics.org/archives/2005/08/29/204457.php) did. 

Posted by Michael Yessis • 9.7.05

http://www.worldhum.com/weblog/item/the_amazing_race_handicapping_season_8_20050905/

Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: gingerman28 on September 08, 2005, 09:22:54 PM
No further writeups of teams in this week's TV GUIDE.  So does that give added significance to the fact that last week they included writeups of only the Aiellos, the Schroeders, and the Gaghans????? }}
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 08, 2005, 11:56:21 PM
 :<( GMan.,To me the Aiellos really have the  <}/  , we shall see about the brains  {l{
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: gingerman28 on September 09, 2005, 10:29:22 AM
If they have seen any of the previous TARs, I hope they realized that the ability to read a map is critical.  In watching the replays of TARs 1 - 5, I am still amazed to see how poorly teams can read maps or follow simple directions and instructions.  What a bunch of klutzes we have had on TAR!!
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 09, 2005, 10:14:10 PM
Springing a NASTY SURPRISE 
Sticking to a familiar formula can make even the hottest reality TV show turn stale. But many are so saturated with twists that the game gets lost in the process
By Jeanmarie Tan
 
September 10, 2005       
 
 
 
 
THE AMAZING RACE 8: FAMILY EDITION


 
ITS eighth season hasn't even aired yet, and already, some fans are upset with the Emmy-winning series.

For the first time, teams now comprise four related family members as opposed to the typical two-person team.

Here's the catch: Half of the teams have contestants younger than 18, and one family includes brothers aged 11 and 8.

Former racer Hera McLeod from the sixth season apparently thinks it will make the race un-Amazing.

She protested on a fan website: 'From what I hear, (the producers) are having a lot of problems with it... Personally, I think it would be a blessing in disguise (if it was canned) because The Amazing Race is not meant for children!'

Adjustments and concessions to the traditionally gruelling around-the-world course have already been made to accommodate the youths.

In the upcoming season which premieres at the end of the month, teams travel only 48,300km - a far cry from the standard 115,900km - and most of the 'globe-trotting' is limited to cities in North America.

More family-friendly, less-crowded locales were chosen, as well as educational and historically significant sites (from the starting line beneath New York's Brooklyn Bridge to the rumoured finish line at Niagara Falls).
 
 
http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/show/story/0,4136,94286,00.html
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: Slowhatch on September 09, 2005, 11:38:19 PM
48,300 km works out to about 30,000 miles, the figure quoted in the USA Today interview. I was wondering how 30,000 turned into 11,000. My guess is that 30,000 is just a figure Van Munster threw off the top of his head for the interview before the final tally was made, and that 11,000 is the more accurate mileage.
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: gingerman28 on September 10, 2005, 11:10:02 PM
11,000 miles seems to be the correct figure.  It is included on screen in one of the CBS promos which have been aired during the last week.

The 30,000 miles was thrown out in an interview published in USAToday when the producers were still teasing us about TAR8 "going around the world".  The world seems to include only North American sites. Hopefully TAR9 will take us back to the world of exotic places we have become accustomed to.

Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: teletart on September 12, 2005, 09:18:23 PM
Hey, thanks Puddin, for looking out for me!   :<(

cheers,
teletart
http://longplastichallway.blogspot.com
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 12, 2005, 09:35:06 PM
 |#' No problem , I try to read all on-line Amazing Race artilcles teletart . I love you're Blog and wish that I could write that well .
Title: Northwood contestant: 'Amazing Race' intense
Post by: puddin on September 14, 2005, 08:58:28 PM
Northwood contestant: 'Amazing Race' intense
Wednesday, September 14, 2005
ERIN ALBERTY
THE SAGINAW NEWS
When summer started, Brock Rogers was a typical college senior looking forward to leaving his Shreveport, La., home for Northwood University, where he planned to carry on a family tradition in automotive marketing.

Three months, 13,000 miles and a television series later, Rogers is bracing for national stardom as CBS launches "The Amazing Race, Family Edition," in which his family races nine others around the world for $1 million.

"It's going to be awesome. I can't wait to see it," Rogers said Tuesday.
The first episode airs Tuesday, Sept. 27.

Rogers' contract forbids him from divulging particulars -- where the show traveled, tasks the competitors had to complete, who won, the personal dramas that come with all reality shows.

But he insists the eighth Amazing Race carries more intensity than the previous seasons, when racers competed in pairs rather than family quartets.

"When there's four, it's that much harder," Rogers said. "There are always four opinions, four individuals that ... can conflict."

Rogers can't say what that means for the Rogers team. He names a "low level of patience" as his biggest weakness, one that gets tested next to his gab-happy dad, Dennis.

"It's just crazy," he said.

But when you're in close and constant contact with your parents and sister through the frustrations and victories of a traveling reality show, a new level of unity is inevitable, he said.

Rogers gives his older sister credit for starting the team. Brittney, 23, competed in the 2003 Miss USA pageant and won NBC's "Fear Factor" earlier this year.

"She brought it up, and I said, 'Heck, yeah! I'd do that,"' Rogers said. He had traveled to Mexico once, but never overseas.

Getting the parents on board was a little more difficult, especially when it meant pulling his dad away from his Dodge dealership. But once you're competing for $1 million, he said, the outside world melts away -- along with the fact that it's going to watch you on TV.

"If there's a prize involved, I don't think anybody's worried about how they look," Rogers said. "They're just focused on that prize."

Any conflict that may have taken place on the road stayed there, at least where one other family is concerned. The Schroeder family of New Orleans picked the Rogers' house as their refuge after Hurricane Katrina destroyed their home. Now they are building a new house in Shreveport, and the two families are hosting a fund-raiser party for the Red Cross on Sept. 27 -- the night of the premier, Rogers said. v
Erin Alberty is a staff writer for The Saginaw News. You may reach her at 776-9673.

http://www.mlive.com/news/sanews/index.ssf?/base/news-16/1126707600236050.xml&coll=9
Title: 'Race' puts co-creator in fast lane
Post by: puddin on September 14, 2005, 09:01:08 PM
Posted: Tue., Sep. 13, 2005, 10:00pm PT
 
Doganieri gets real as co-exec producer
 
By MICHAEL SCHNEIDER
 
 
"The Amazing Race" has handed Elise Doganieri a "fast-forward" pass, promoting her to co-exec producer of the CBS reality skein.
Doganieri created the skein, which has won the top reality series Emmy for two years in a row, with husband Bertram van Munster. Van Munster -- the show's exec producer -- and Doganieri also share co-creator credit.

Doganieri had previously been supervising producer and, before that, producer on the show. "The Amazing Race" is aiming for a third consecutive kudo at this Sunday's Primetime Emmys.

Skein will premiere its eighth season -- a special family edition, with teams consisting of four relatives -- on Sept. 27. Show will hit its 100th episode mark sometime this fall.

" 'Race' has created such a special niche for itself in the genre, and I look forward to creating another 100 shows," Doganieri said.

Besides "Race," Doganieri's credits include serving as a producer on ABC's "Profiles From the Front Line" as well as producer and story editor on the pilot for Paramount's firstrun skein "Wild Things." She worked in advertising before moving into TV.

The reality adventure follows teams traveling around the world, competing on various challenges and following instructions on clues labeled "detour," "road block" and "fast forward." Series, which premiered in 2001, comes from Bruckheimer TV, Earthview, Touchstone TV and Amazing Race Prods.

http://www.variety.com/article/VR1117929073?categoryid=14&cs=1#loop
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: Slowhatch on September 14, 2005, 09:47:15 PM
It probably wasn't too hard for Mike Schneider to get an interview. In addition to his Variety work and his his blog (here http://franklinavenue.blogspot.com/), Mike and WRP seem to go back a ways. Here's his birthday party--
http://www.hopstudios.com/nep/albums/birthdayrace/index_2.html
complete with real TAR flags, real TAR envelopes, and real Phil. Chip and Kim managed to show at his housewarming--
http://halloweenrace.blogspot.com/

Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: gingerman28 on September 15, 2005, 01:27:42 PM
TV Guide continues to ignore nine of the ten family teams. The only team with four color pix this week are the Blacks. Of course, they have the giddy shirts that make them stand out.  But does this mean they end up gone soon or later?
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 15, 2005, 03:10:22 PM
Raises hand and shouts " Sooner "  :<(
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: gingerman28 on September 16, 2005, 04:31:27 PM
Nah, that's an Oklahoma football team and they ain't going anyplace fast this year.  But the promos keep featuring the Blacks. I don't rememer when one team was featured so much over the others, not even Romber.
Title: 'Amazing' experience
Post by: puddin on September 17, 2005, 04:23:09 PM

 
Tony Lascari, Midland Daily News 09/17/2005
 

    Brock Rodgers expects this season of CBS's "The Amazing Race" to be better than the rest.

    He might have a biased view, though, as the Northwood University freshman competed with his parents and sister in the reality show pitting families against each other in a race around the world.


    "I love the show," he said. "I've watched like every season."


    Rodgers, 19, is returning home to Shreveport, La., to use the first showing Tuesday night as a chance to raise funds for the American Red Cross with his family.


    "We're renting out a big restaurant and we're going to charge $5 and give it to the Red Cross," he said.


    The show will be shown locally at 9 p.m. Tuesday on WNEM-5.


    In past seasons, two teammates traveled together competing for $1 million, but the eighth season of the show has 10 families of four racing for the top prize.


    Rodgers said having more participants adds to the drama.


    "Any time there's more people, there's going to be more conflict too," he said.


    The season was taped during the summer, and Rodgers can't give away much information about the series until it airs because of his contract with CBS.


    "No results, no experiences, nothing that went on, nothing about my competition," he said.


    He did share that fellow contestants, the Schroeder family, stayed at his parents' home for a couple of weeks because their home was under water after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast.


    Rodgers said his sister, Brittney, 23, pitched the idea to the family for going on the show. She had won an episode of another reality show, "Fear Factor," that featured Miss USA contestants.


    Their father, Denny, is president and general manager of a car dealership and their mother, Renee, owns a boutique and is a beauty pageant trainer.



 http://www.ourmidland.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=15229427&BRD=2289&PAG=461&dept_id=472542&rfi=6
Title: Moms survive their own 'Amazing Race'
Post by: puddin on September 23, 2005, 10:42:38 AM
Moms survive their own 'Amazing Race'
By Rick Holland/ Staff Writer
Friday, September 23, 2005

Call it the ultimate male bonding experience.
 
     That's what a Mansfield man and the husbands of his three daughters will bring to a national television audience on Tuesday night, when the first episode in a new season of the reality show "The Amazing Race" airs on CBS.
 
     Erin Drive resident Tony Aiello will appear as part of a family team that competes against nine others in a 30-day around the world scavenger hunt for a top prize of $1 million.
 
     Joining Aiello are his three sons-in-law, Kevin Kempskie, Matt Hanson, and David Alverson, and while all four men are contractually forbidden to make any comment about their experience, Aiello's wife Barbara described what it was like to have the men in the family gone for an extended period.
 

 
     "It was very different, not having them here," said Barbara. "Something might happen during the day and my thought was to call (Tony) and ask for an opinion...then I'd realize that I couldn't."
 
     Part of the agreement Barbara and her three daughters signed before their husbands started the game, was that they would have no contact with them whatsoever, nor would they be informed of any details regarding their whereabouts. Show producers called them once a week during the taping of the show "to let us know they were alive, that was it," said Lisa Hanson, one of Barbara's daughters.
 
     An exception was made on the morning of July 7, just five days after the family had exchanged tearful farewells at the airport, marking the start of the game. On that date, a series of terrorist bombs exploded in London, killing 52 people.
 
     A representative from CBS called immediate family members, but the details were excruciatingly sparse. For all they knew, Barbara along with Lisa and her sisters Heather Kempskie and Amy Alverson thought their husbands could have been in London on July 7.
 
     "They called and told us only 'they're fine,'" recalled Lisa, though she was still not told where her family's team was located

"That's when it hit me that this is my husband's life, and it was a little weird that I could not be told where he was," said Lisa. "That morning was so scary because we had no idea where they were."
 
     Nor could they reach out to anyone outside the family to help ease the burden of anxiety. That's because everyone was bound by contract with CBS to keep secret the fact that the family had even been selected as contestants for the show.
 
     As a result, invites from friends and neighbors to backyard barbecues became exercises in crafting evasive responses. Barbara and her daughters had to attend such events without their husbands, and then provide vague answers when asked where their spouses were.
 

 
     A sense of reassurance during the game, though, came from something Tony told his daughters before their husbands left.
 
     "Dad said to us, 'I promise I'll bring these guys home,'" said Heather, who added that in addition to a variety of wonderful traits, her father's "number one priority is safety."
 
     The Aiellos' team was picked from a pool of 25,000 entries to appear in the upcoming season of "The Amazing Race." Tony made an impression among show producers, early on in the selection process. When the family had to submit a two-minute video to go along with a written application, Tony played the part of a mafia godfather, quizzing his sons-in-law about their worthiness as husbands and show contestants,
 
     "I think the show producers saw my dad as this short, lovable, Italian guy and they were intrigued by him entering with his three sons-in-law," said Heather.
 
     On the day their husbands returned, there was joy in even the smallest things.
 
     "You have to remember, we hadn't seen or heard from them, we hadn't even heard their voices for a month," said Heather.
 
     "There is something to be said for the idea that absence makes the heart grow fonder," said Lisa.
 
     As much as the men learned about each other during the month-long adventure, their wives also had some time to engage in self discovery.

"I learned that I'm capable of much more than I thought I was," said Lisa, describing what she learned about herself during Matt's absence. As an example, she described finding a tick on her son's head and removing it.
 
     "Taking care of the tick, that would have been a 'dad thing,'" she said.
 
     She saved the insect storing it in a plastic bag as a trophy to her courage for Matt to see when he returned. Among other manly duties, the two sisters also said they took out the trash and contemplated lawn care.
 
     Once back home, however, after what was literally a voyage around the world, the husbands jumped back into their roles as regular dads.
 
     "Within two hours after coming home, Kevin was changing a dirty diaper," Heather said.
 
     As difficult and rewarding as the experience was the entire family, the game also had an effect on the Heather and Lisa's 2-year-old sons. Both Kevin and Matt left video messages for their kids and small surprise presents to be opened when moods turned especially sad.
 
     By way of explanation about Kevin's whereabouts, Heather said she told her son, Kyle, that he had flown away on a plane but would be coming back before too long. After that point, whenever Kyle spotted or heard a plane, he'd point to it and say, "There's daddy!"
 
     "It just broke your heart," said Heather.
 
     For Lisa, she said that Matt hadn't been away from their kids for a single night since they were born, so the prospect of being gone for at 30 nights in a row was daunting.
 
     "We broke out the calendar with the month of July and just filled it up," said Lisa.
 
     By the time the month had passed, a jubilant reunion occurred at the Providence airport. The men came down a long escalator into the waiting arms of wives, kids and extended family.
 
     "In a way, coming down to meet us was symbolic, like they were coming back to earth," said Heather.
 
     The entire family has plans to be on the ground and under the same roof at Tony and Barbara's house to watch the first episode of the show on Tuesday night

"I'm looking forward to it on the one hand, but a little apprehensive, too," said Barbara. "You read about how they edit things, so we've had a few laughs not knowing what to expect."
 
     "The Amazing Race" season premiere will air on Tues., Sept. 27 at 9 p.m. on CBS.

http://www2.townonline.com/norton/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=331679&format=&page=1
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 23, 2005, 10:52:40 PM
sort of a repeat of a previous article on the Weavers but here it is anyway..


Local widow, kids to compete on 'Amazing Race'

A Volusia man's death spurs his wife and kids to compete on tv.

Ludmilla Lelis | Sentinel Staff Writer
Posted September 23, 2005

DAYTONA BEACH -- The family of a Volusia County man who was killed at Daytona International Speedway last year is competing against nine other families in the upcoming season of the CBS television show The Amazing Race.

Linda Weaver, 46, and her three children, 19-year-old Rebecca, 16-year-old Rachel and 14-year-old Rolly, are vying in the international quest for $1 million and will appear in the reality series when the new season premieres Tuesday.

  The show was filmed in July, but the winner will not be revealed until the end of the 13-episode series.

The father of the family, Roy Weaver III, was struck and killed by a race car at the speedway Feb. 8, 2004, as he was removing debris from the track. The family has a wrongful-death lawsuit pending against the track and the race-car driver involved.

His death put the Ormond Beach family into a "tailspin," Linda Weaver said in a video interview released by CBS that was done at the start of the race.

Family members declined an interview request because their TV contract forbids interviews until the show is over or until the family is eliminated from the contest, said their attorney Bruce Anderson.

The Weavers had a traditional family, with Roy as the authority figure, the breadwinner, a "man's man," Linda Weaver said in the video clip. "Everything got messed up," she said.

For a while, the family struggled to cope. Meanwhile, Linda Weaver, who had been a stay-at-home mom, became a teacher at Calvary Christian Academy in Ormond Beach.

Then came the opportunity to join the TV show, which features teams that must race around the globe and complete tasks at different locations. For example, teams this past season had to rope a pair of llamas in Peru and roll a wooden elephant to a Hindu temple in India.

"One of the reasons why we want to do the race is just to really work together as a team, and accomplish a goal and find out we're still a family -- we're still a victorious family," Linda Weaver said.

"We were a strong, united family before," she said. "Now we're going to be a strong, united family again."

"There's not going to be any outside distractions. It's just going to be us, working together," added the oldest sibling, Rebecca, during the same video clip.

Executive producer and co-creator of the show Bertram van Munster said the Weavers were picked as one of the 10 families because producers thought they could be competitive.

"We thought they were a good, strong team," van Munster said. "It's an exhausting trip, and it's a trip that takes a month to complete."

Roy Weaver's death wasn't a factor when the show decided to cast them, he said.

"It might have been a motivation for them, but it wasn't a motivation for us," he said.

The first seven seasons of the show featured two-member teams, often married or dating couples or best friends, in a race that spans more than 60,000 miles. For the eighth season, the producers decided to make the race for four-member families.

"People always ask us, 'What changes are you making? Are you going to keep it fresh?' " van Munster said. "Luckily, we had some phenomenal families."

He didn't think that the show's loyal fans would be disappointed, though some fan Web sites had worried about the "family-friendly" race format, which covered about half the mileage of prior seasons.

Though TV officials are careful not to give away race details, some fan sites have posted potential sightings of the teams as they make their round-the-world adventure. Nathanael D. Robinson, a graduate student from Brandeis University in Massachusetts, thought he may have spotted Linda Weaver this summer.

Robinson said he encountered a middle-age blond woman in Paris and that the situation seemed to resemble a scene from The Amazing Race.

"Seeing the teams for the eighth season has not put my mind at ease," he said. "In particular, Linda Weaver looks like the woman who approached us." He admits, though, that he's not certain


At least one close friend of the family knows she'll be watching. Ellen Kaslewicz, a friend from Roy Weaver's Alabama high school, thinks that he would have gotten a kick out of seeing his family in the race.

"I know that Roy would have been so proud of his wife and kids to be able to accomplish just the process of being considered for the show," the Deltona woman said. "Roy was a strong Christian, as well as his wife and children, and I believe when the show airs, we will see a little of Roy in his wife and kids in The Amazing Race.

"Go, Weavers!" she cheered.

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/volusia/orl-vweaver2305sep23,0,938479.story?coll=orl-news-headlines-volusia
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 25, 2005, 12:03:19 AM
The Amazing Race 8
 From Virginia Soto,
Your Guide to Chicago.
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Biographies of Chicagoland contestants competing in The Amazing Race 8
Survivor Guatemala - Links
The Apprentice 4 - Links

This season of The Amazing Race, which premieres Tuesday, September 27, 2005, will be different from the previous ones. This time, we will have families competing instead of couples -- for the first time, the teams will consist of four people instead of two, and children can be part of the group (the minimum age for a contestant is eight). Whereas before the two people competing could just be friends, now each team needs to be related in some way, whether biologically or by marriage.

Looking at the families that are competing, one can see that some are composed of adults only, and some are composed of a mix of adults and children.

(It will be interesting to see what kinds of contests the producers come up with to even out the field, so that those families with children are not left behind.)
The two families that come from the Chicagoland area are:

The Bransen Family:
The Bransen family team from Park Ridge, Illinois, is made up of a father and his three daughters, who once appeared together in a Pert shampoo commercial several years ago.

Walter, 51, the self-proclaimed leader of the group, has been married for 31 years. He works as a CFO and is a native of Chicago. The proud dad of five children, Walter describes himself as being reserved and analytical. He is also a history buff in regards to anything about Abraham Lincoln and belongs to the Abraham Lincoln Association.

Elizabeth, 25, is the oldest daughter. She recently obtained a Masters in Social Work from the University of Illinois. Elizabeth describes herself as personable and trustworthy and has a fear of heights. She and Walter have similar personalities and sometimes their stubbornness can cause friction between the two.

Lauren, 22, recently earned a Bachelor's degree in Communications and Business Management from Hope College. Punctual and adaptable, Lauren admits she can be impatient.

Lindsay, 20, is the youngest of the sisters. Currently, she's enrolled at Hope College, also majoring in Social Work. Lindsay complains that her older sisters are always telling her what to do.

The Bransens are well-traveled and eager to compete as a family for a chance to win the $1 million prize.

The Godlewski Family:
The Godlewski Family is a team of four sisters from Des Plaines, Illinois. The four sisters, from oldest to youngest, are: Michelle, Sharon, Christine, and Tricia. Each sister has her own personality, which may cause some roadblocks of their own along the way.

Michelle, 42, is the most direct of the team. She describes herself as excitable and competitive.

Sharon, 39, works as an insurance claim consultant. She says she's alluring personable and admits she that she thrives on challenges.

Christine, 37, is a bit obsessive. A homemaker and the mother of four, Christine's biggest pet peeve about herself is not being able to defend herself when she gets into an argument with her siblings.

Tricia, 26, the youngest of the team, is always forced to play the role of peacemaker.

Tricia is hoping the Race will show her sisters she has what it takes to endure The Amazing Race.
All four sisters live within thirty minutes of one another. Although they have traveled extensively together, the Race will surely put their relationships to the test as they embark on a much different kind of family vacation


http://chicago.about.com/od/newspapersradiotv/a/091805_race.htm
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 25, 2005, 12:07:20 AM
Unioto grad's kids have 'Amazing' experience

Unioto grad's kids have 'Amazing' experience

By JESSICA BURCHARD
Gazette Staff Writer

 
Terri Linz had no idea what would happen to her four children when she saw them off at the Cincinnati airport July 1.
"We put them on a plane and, from that point on, I had no idea what they were doing," said Linz. "We just let them go for five weeks."

Linz's four adult children left for the east coast this summer to participate in the eighth season of CBS television's "The Amazing Race." The four oldest children of the family's seven offspring were invited to apply to the program after running into a reality show producer while on vacation.

"They were on vacation in Cancun and a producer spotted them and said they would be good candidates for the show," said family friend Beverly Corbett.

Corbett knows the Linz family through the childrens' mother, with whom she attended school at Unioto. Linz and her sister, Susan Halley, graduated around the same time as Corbett, but both later moved to accommodate their families.

"I've stayed in touch with both of them," said Corbett. "They still know a lot of people in the area."

The family members representing the Linzes on the "Amazing Race: Family Edition" are Tommy, 19, and Megan, 21, college students attending Miami University; Nick, 24, who works in sales and lives in Buffalo, N.Y.; and Alex, 22, a University of Cincinnati graduate who works as an emergency room technician.

Megan is the sole female member on the team, but her mother thinks she handled it well.

"Nick is the self-appointed leader of the group because he's the oldest," said Linz. "I feel sorry for Megan traveling with them, but she has adapted really well to being around the boys."

The premise of "The Amazing Race" is to leave each group clues to lead them to various locations to collect more clues. The team to reach the final destination first wins $1 million and several prizes.

Despite having finished the race several months ago, none of the adventure game's contestants can speak about their experience until the show has finished airing on CBS later this year.

"They took off the entire month of July," Corbett said. "They couldn't talk to other family members for 30 days. When they came back they couldn't comment."

Whether the Linz team is declared the winners or not, their mother sees it as just a fun experience for them.

"It's pretty fun," she said. "The kids are humble enough to take it with a grain of salt."


"The Amazing Race: Family Edition" will premiere 9 p.m. Tuesday on CBS.

http://www.chillicothegazette.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050924/NEWS01/509240310/1002
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 25, 2005, 12:13:46 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Amazing Race: Family Edition Two Hour Premiere Airs September 27th

 

The Amazing Race: Family Edition Two Hour Premiere Airs September 27th  9/22/05

 

TEN FAMILIES EMBARK ON THE ULTIMATE FAMILY VACATION WHEN THE EMMY AWARD-WINNING REALITY SERIES "THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION" DEBUTS WITH A SPECIAL 2-HOUR BROADCAST, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 ON THE CBS TELEVISION NETWORK

"Go Mommy Go! We Can Beat Them!" -- Ten families will embark on the ultimate family vacation with one family taking home the $1 million prize when THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION, the three-time Emmy Award-winning reality series, premieres with a special two-hour broadcast, Tuesday, September 27 (9:00-11:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network. Phil Keoghan is the host of the series.

The picturesque New York skyline emerges as water taxis speed the 10 families across the New York Harbor as they ready themselves for a high-energy race through Manhattan. Fireworks begin immediately as one family bickers about getting lost in the crowded streets while another team complains of a leg injury. After completing their first task, families travel to Pennsylvania where they must paddle a rowboat across the Delaware River, the same place where George Washington famously crossed the Delaware during the Revolutionary War. At the detour, families choose between building a miniature working water mill or pulling a traditional Amish buggy along a 1.5-mile course. One family has a big scare as their buggy nearly runs over a team member, while another team becomes exhausted pushing their buggy through the countryside.

THE AMAZING RACE: FAMILY EDITION is an adventure reality show hosted by Phil Keoghan that pits 10 teams of families against each other in a race around the world for approximately 30 days. At every destination, each family must compete in a series of challenges, some mental and some physical, and only when the tasks have been completed will they learn their next destination. Families who are the farthest behind will gradually be eliminated as the contest progresses, with the first team to arrive at the final destination winning $1 million.

Following are the 10 families, listed in no particular order:

TEAM: GODLEWSKI SISTERS Hometown: Des Plaines, Ill.

TEAM: WEAVER FAMILY (WIDOW AND KIDS) Hometown: Ormond Beach, Fla.

TEAM: GAGHAN FAMILY

Hometown: Glastonbury, Conn.

TEAM: BLACK FAMILY

Hometown: Woodbridge, Va.

TEAM: LINZ FAMILY (SIBLINGS)

Hometown: Cincinnati

TEAM: ROGERS FAMILY

Hometown: Shreveport, La.

TEAM: SCHROEDER FAMILY (DAD, STEPMOM AND KIDS)

Hometown: New Orleans

TEAM: BRANSEN FAMILY (DAD AND DAUGHTERS)

Hometown: Park Ridge, Ill.

TEAM: AIELLO FAMILY (FATHER AND SONS-IN-LAW)

Hometown: Mansfield, Mass.

TEAM: PAOLO FAMILY

Hometown: Carmel, N.Y.

RATING: To Be Announced

Source: CBS Press Release
http://www.celebrityspider.com/news/september05/article092205-11.html
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 25, 2005, 12:23:37 AM
An Amazing Race Fundraiser
RealityTVFan + September 21st, 2005 + no replies



One of the families that competed in the upcoming family addition is helping victims of Hurricand Katrina and having a opening night party all at the same time! The Rodgers family of Shreveport, La is using the first showing on Tuesday night as a chance to help raise fund for the Red Cross.

“We’re renting out a big restaurant and we’re going to charge $5 and give it to the Red Cross,” said Brock Rodgers, aged 19.

In past episodes of the show, two teammates worked together competing for the first place prize of $1 million. This season has a different twist as 10 families of four race for the big money. The season was taped during the summer, and Rodgers can’t give away much information about the series until it airs because of his contract with CBS. “No results, no experiences, nothing that went on, nothing about my competition,” he said.

I guess we will all have to tune in and watch on Tuesday! By the way, this also confirms that it is indeed this very same Rodgers family that claims, Brittney, 23…..one and the same who won an episode of Fear Factor that featured Miss USA contestants.

http://www.americanrealitytv.com/reality-tv/19/#more-19
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 25, 2005, 03:45:39 PM
Their own 'Amazing Race'
By Rick Holland/ Staff Writer
Thursday, September 22, 2005

BELLINGHAM - Call it the ultimate male bonding experience.
 
     That's what two Bellingham residents will bring to a national television audience on Tuesday night, when the first episode in a new season of the reality show "The Amazing Race" airs on CBS.
 
     Wrentham Road residents Kevin Kempskie and Matt Hanson will appear as part of team that competes against nine others in a 30-day around the world scavenger hunt for a top prize of $1 million.
 
     Joining Kempskie and Hanson, is their father-in-law, Tony Aiello, of Mansfield, and another of Tony's son-in-laws, David Alverson, who lives in North Providence, R. I.
 

 
     While all four men are contractually forbidden to make any comment about their experience, Kevin and Matt's twin-sister wives, Heather Kempskie and Lisa Hanson, spoke at length about surviving their own "amazing race," which included month-long stints as single moms to a combined total of four kids, all of whom are under 2 1/2 years old.
 
     "I learned that I'm capable of much more than I thought I was," said Lisa, describing what she learned about herself during Matt's absence. As an example, she described finding a tick on her son's head and removing it. "Taking care of the tick, that would have been a 'dad thing,'" she said.
 
     She saved the insect storing it in a plastic bag as a trophy to her courage for Matt to see when he returned. Among other manly duties, the two sisters also said they took out the trash and contemplated lawn care.
 
     Once back in Bellingham, however, after what was literally a voyage around the world, the husbands jumped back into their roles as regular dads.
 
     "Within two hours after coming home, Kevin was changing a dirty diaper," Heather said.
 
     On a serious note, the separation from their husbands provided a particularly difficult psychological and emotional challenge for Heather and Lisa. While the family's selection as a team was an honor - they were one of 10 family teams from a pool of 25,000 entries - Heather, Lisa, their mother, Barbara Aiello and their sister Amy Alverson, were all told upfront that they could have no contact whatsoever with the men until they returned.

Show producers called them once a week during the taping of the show "to let us know they were alive, that was it," said Lisa.
 
     An exception was made on the morning of July 7, just five days after the family had exchanged tearful farewells at the airport, marking the start of the game. On that date, a series of terrorist bombs exploded in London, killing 52 people.
 
     A representative from CBS called immediate family members, but the details were excruciatingly sparse. For all they knew, Heather, Lisa, Amy and Barbara thought their husbands could have been in London on July 7.
 

 
     "They called and told us only 'they're fine,'" recalled Lisa, though she was still not told where her family's team was located.
 
     "That's when it hit me that this is my husband's life, and it was a little weird that I could not be told where he was," said Lisa. "That morning was so scary because we had no idea where they were."
 
     Nor could they reach out to anyone outside the family to help ease the burden of anxiety. That's because everyone was bound by contract with CBS to keep secret the fact that the family had even been selected as contestants for the show.
 
     As a result, invites from friends and neighbors to backyard barbecues became exercises in crafting evasive responses. Heather and Lisa had to attend such events without their husbands, and then provide vague answers when asked where Kevin or Matt were.
 
     Providing a sense of reassurance during the game, though, was something Tony told his daughters before their husbands left.
 
     "Dad said to us, 'I promise I'll bring these guys home,'" said Heather, who added that in addition to a variety of wonderful traits, her father's "number one priority is safety."
 
     To maintain some kind of connection, the couples each kept journals, though those written by Kevin and Matt can only be shown to their wives as each episode airs. The men remain under contract not to let anyone know how they did in the race until the are either eliminated during an episode, or are unveiled as the show's winners.

On the day their husbands returned, there was joy in even the smallest things.
 
     "You have to remember, we hadn't seen or heard from them, we hadn't even heard their voices for a month," said Heather.
 
     The separation allowed the two sisters to really think about their relationships with their husbands. "They were desperately missed, but we would recommend (some time apart) for all couples," said Heather.
 
     "There is something to be said for the idea that absence makes the heart grow fonder," said Lisa.
 

 
     As difficult and rewarding as the experience was for Heather and Lisa, the game also had an effect on their 2-year-old sons. Both Kevin and Matt left video messages for their kids and small surprise presents to be opened when moods turned especially sad.
 
     By way of explanation about Kevin's whereabouts, Heather said she told her son, Kyle, that he had flown away on a plane but would be coming back before too long. After that point, whenever Kyle spotted or heard a plane, he'd point to it and say, "There's daddy!"
 
     "It just broke your heart," said Heather.
 
     For Lisa, she said that Matt hadn't been away from their kids for a single night since they were born, so the prospect of being gone for at 30 nights in a row was daunting.
 
     "We broke out the calendar with the month of July and just filled it up," said Lisa.
 
     By the time the month had passed, a jubilant reunion occurred at the Providence airport. The men came down a long escalator into the waiting arms of wives, kids and extended family. "In a way, coming down to meet us was symbolic, like they were coming back to earth," said Heather.
 
     Within hours, Lisa and Matt's son, Noah, was wrestling with his dad, throwing pillows "and playing all the games they had missed with each other over the past month," said Lisa

Kyle also had a wonderful reunion with Kevin, but said, "I don't want daddy to ever go on a plane again."
 
     "The Amazing Race" season premiere will air on Tues., Sept. 27 at 9 p.m. on CBS.

http://www2.townonline.com/bellingham/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=331261&format=&page=1
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: gingerman28 on September 25, 2005, 10:14:41 PM
To my mind, just too much pre-race publicity about the family teams is being generated by local papers around the country. Can't remember any previous TAR with so much info being given out about all the team members so far in advance of the start of the actual race.

Me thinks that CBS is getting worried about the appeal of the four-person teams, the trip only covering 11,000 miles and travel only around North America. So they are encouraging local papers from each team's home town to hype them to the sky blue heavens.
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 25, 2005, 11:05:14 PM
The Amazing Race Schroeder Family Lost Everything In Hurricane Katrina
On the Amazing Race Family Edition, ten families compete in a grueling race around the world for a million dollar prize.  However, nothing encountered on The Amazing Race can compare to what one of the families competing on the show has been through recently.  The Schroeder family is from New Orleans, Louisiana and lost everything during Hurricane Katrina

more here
http://www.realitytvmagazine.com/blog/2005/09/the_amazing_rac_1.html
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 26, 2005, 10:37:46 AM


By John Kiesewetter
Enquirer staff writer

 
 
 
Tom (left), Nick, Alex and Megan Linz of Anderson Township will be competiting in "The Amazing Race" starting Tuesday.
 
 
ON THE AIR
What: "The Amazing Race: Family Edition"

When: 9-11 p.m. Tuesday
 
"AMAZING RACE" HOST HERE
Host Phil Keoghan will sign DVDs of "The Amazing Race" first season 3-5 p.m. Thursday at the new West Chester Township Wal-Mart, 8288 Cincinnati-Dayton Road, just north of I-75.
 
It's amazing. Everywhere Terri Linz goes, somebody tells her how much they love "The Amazing Race."

And how much they're looking forward to seeing her children - Nick, 24, Alex, 23, Megan, 21 and Tommy (aka "Bone"), 19 - on "The Amazing Race: Family Edition" premiering Tuesday (9-11 p.m., Channels 12, 7).

"I hadn't seen the show," says Linz, 52, of Anderson Township. She didn't know that Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky was the No. 1 market for CBS' "The Amazing Race" and "Survivor."

"It has been a real enlightenment to me," she says. "I've never had time to sit and watch TV in the evening."

The mother of seven - and part-time Clermont Mercy Hospital nurse - has set aside Tuesday night to watch the show at an undisclosed location.

A very large location.

"We thought we'd have 100 or so, but we're doubling that," she says.

CBS won't allow her to mention the site. The network wants to maintain the illusion that the Linzes - and nine other family teams - are still traveling around the globe in hopes of winning $1 million. The show was taped in July.

For the first time, teams have been expanded from two people to four family members. Participants range in age from 8 to 57. The show won a third consecutive Emmy for best reality show last week.

Team Linz is Nick, 24, a salesman for the family business in Buffalo, N.Y.; Alex, 23, an emergency room technician; Megan, 21, and Tommy ("Bone"), 19, both Miami University students. Nick and Alex played on the 1998 St. Xavier High School state runner-up football team.

They proudly wear Bengals'shirts, and call themselves the "Who Dey" team.

"The kids are having fun seeing the excitement about it and the excitement this year for the Bengals," says mom, official CBS spokeswoman for her children.

She says she doesn't know any details about the show - and couldn't talk about it anyway. But she has been assured by the kids that the family - and Cincinnati - will be proud of them.

"I don't know anything. The kids just look at me and say, 'Mom, watch the show!' They tell me that there are no embarrassing situations. It's just going to be fun."

http://news.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050926/ENT/509260307/-1/CINCI
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: gingerman28 on September 26, 2005, 03:24:12 PM
One of the sports betting sites in LV has stopped taking bets on the Linz Family.  Rumor has it that there was extraordinary bets being placed from Ohio during the last week.  At the same time Mrs. Linz is saying that her kids have told her that Cincinnati will be proud of them.  Giveaway that the Linz kids actually do win?
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 26, 2005, 04:15:13 PM
another article with the Blacks in the spotlight

(http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b105/rawalsh/TAR_8/22.jpg)

Amazing Race’ has lost its way
Show keeps tweaking format as ratings climbed

CBS
Will the addition of families improve or ruin 'The Amazing Race'? 

 
COMMENTARY
By Andy Dehnart
MSNBC contributor
Updated: 4:57 p.m. ET Sept. 26, 2005
The past year and a half has been rough for long-time fans of “The Amazing Race.” The first season debuted in 2001, but only in the series’ fourth year did it finally earn the audience and massive fan base it always deserved.

Unfortunately, success came with a price.

During the first four seasons, two-member teams of people with preexisting relationships raced around the world. From Johannesburg to Manila, Hong Kong to Paris, Mexico City to Venice, they were challenged to navigate unfamiliar places, complete physically and mentally challenging tasks, and overcome the stresses placed on their relationship.
Parents grew closer to their children, grandparents finished tasks they didn’t think they’d be able to complete, couples learned that their communication skills weren’t quite as strong as they’d imagined, and friends laughed and bonded on their way to the finish line. Viewers grew frustrated with “equalizers,” pre-arranged transportation or hours of operation at certain tasks that caused the teams to bunch up, but also kept the tension ratcheted up. Along the way, these teams formed friendships with their fellow racers and sometimes butted heads when their paths crossed. All but one pair would be “Philiminated” — told that they “been eliminated from the race” by host Phil Keoghan — while the rest would keep running, ensuring our pulses would be racing until the very last minute.

And then came season five.

In the summer of 2004, “The Amazing Race 5” became a hit, ending its 12-episode run with a finale that was watched by 50 percent more viewers than watched the previous season’s conclusion. That was also the season that the race officially changed. With the introduction of two new elements, the series took a different route than it had its previous four seasons.

Ch-ch-ch-changes
The most significant change was the Yield, an option that permitted one team to force another team to stop racing for a period of time. While in the past teams sometimes worked together, and occasionally worked against one another, the Yield fundamentally changed the series’ focus from the race to the dynamics between the teams. Instead of just racing against other teams, they were now playing against other teams.

Also during “The Amazing Race 5,” producers changed the rules for non-elimination legs. Teams that arrived to pit stops in last place occasionally were not eliminated. But during the fifth season, teams who came in last on those special, predetermined non-elimination legs were forced to surrender all their money (and, a few seasons later, all of their possessions). This left the team to wander around a country begging for money from locals and tourists, all while a camera crew awkwardly, ridiculously, and offensively taped their quest for $1 million.

The casting also changed the series. For the fifth season, CBS decided to pimp out a star from its summer reality series to its Emmy winning series, and former “Big Brother” houseguest, Alison, and her boyfriend joined the race. Alison was pretty universally loathed on “Big Brother,” and viewers remained baffled why the producers would let such a twit tarnish “The Amazing Race.” Of course, the answer was ratings.

“The Amazing Race 5” also included pompous and verbally abusive Colin and his suffering girlfriend Christie, giving the series its first detestable villain. And Charla Faddoul’s presence on the cast also caused some concerns, at least initially. As a little person, the first reality show contestant not to be of average height, her inclusion on the show seemed like stunt casting at best and exploitation at worst.

As it turned out, Alison and Donny were eliminated at the end of the second leg, after annoying the world with their immature bickering. And Charla’s heart quickly captured viewers, as she showed she was more capable and strong than her teammate and cousin, Mirna, and frequently stronger than other racers.

As Charla hauled a 55-pound side of beef through the streets of Uruguay, she gave the series one of its few iconic moments and the rest of us a lesson in perseverance and will, shaming anyone who thought a person’s lack of height could limit their abilities. When Charla and Mirna were eliminated from the race, even usually stoic Phil Keoghan broke down.

But Charla left early and Colin and Christie made it all the way to the end, arriving at the finish line in second place. Between the abrasive personalities and the new rules, producers had injected their show with elements of other reality series. Then the ratings increased, because apparently many viewers weren’t smart enough to appreciate a show that was more than just a popularity contest.

That led the way for future contestants Jonathan and Victoria, Rob and Amber, and others, all of whom gave us more fighting and backstabbing than we usually see on a season of “Survivor.” Specifically, Rob and Amber’s aggressive play changed the face of “The Amazing Race”; instead of focusing getting themselves further in the race, they also focused on slowing other teams down. Their use of strategy was within the confines of the game, but as a result, the competition became more than a race.

It’s not as if the first seasons didn’t have their share of dramatic confrontations or even villains. “The Amazing Race” has seen plenty of abrasive personalities; season three’s winner, Flo, was known for her shrieking fits, during which she often insisted she was quitting the race. And from the first season on, contestants have always shared information—or declined to be helpful—based upon how much they like other teams.

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/9493274/
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 26, 2005, 07:13:26 PM
this one thanks to Chateau



» More From The Star Ledger   


 
8-legged race is 4 too many
Monday, September 26, 2005
BY ALAN SEPINWALL
Star-Ledger Staff
"THE AMAZING Race" has always been the reality show for people who don't like reality shows, with a premise so ingenious and simple that it didn't need the constant gimmicks other reality shows have to invoke to stay fresh. So why did the "Race" producers feel compelled to twist things up for the eighth season?

Instead of teams of two traveling the globe, now we have families of four. Some are nuclear families with a mom, a dad and small kids (the youngest is 8), while others include four siblings in their late teens and 20s and a middle-aged father and his three sons-in-law.

This causes several problems right away. First, one of the show's few flaws is that there are too many people to keep track of in the early episodes, and now the number's doubled.

 Advertisement
 


   
 

Second, past casts have featured all kinds of interesting combinations -- mothers and sons, siblings, husbands and wives, people who just started dating (and who usually break up during the show) -- while this group is more homogenous. There's a middle-aged man competing with his three sons-in-law, and a team of four teen and twentysomething sibs, but virtually every other group is a traditional nuclear family, with the only thing distinguishing them their ages and accents.

Also, a good chunk of the show's appeal has been as a travelogue, with contestants running through gorgeous landmarks around the globe. The two-hour family edition premiere (tomorrow at 9 p.m., Ch. 2) starts in Manhattan and then stays in Manhattan, then stays in Manhattan again, then features a jaunt down the Jersey Turnpike (where the smarter teams stop for directions at the Vince Lombardi service area), then stops in Philly before a jaunt through Pennsylvania Dutch country.

This may be the longest single stretch within U.S. borders in the show's history, and resembles a family car trip more than an exciting international race. Rumors have abounded that the teams will only get as far as Central America this year, probably to spare the younger kids (including an 8-year-old boy and 9-year-old girl) from the rigors of constant travel.

The good news is that certain parts of the show are tinker-proof. The challenges are still inventive and geographically appropriate (they have to buy hot dogs on 91st & Lex and race carriages in Lancaster, Pa.). And while the show has generally favored teams with greater strength or athleticism, it doesn't look in the early going like the teams with small children are at a significant disadvantage. (If anything, the kids prove useful during the carriage race, since they're lighter and easier to pull.)

Maybe in a few weeks, when the numbers have dwindled from 44 to, say, 28, and the contestants have gone somewhere that requires a passport, it'll be easier to tell whether the family idea should be repeated in the future.

But right now, it's disconcerting that the highlight of the premiere was the sight of two former contestants handing out clues at the hot dog stand and looking increasingly dismayed -- either because they think the new format is odd or, more likely, because only one person recognized them.

-- Alan Sepinwall

http://www.nj.com/search/index.ssf?/base/columns-0/1127710201243320.xml?starledger?colatv&coll=1
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 26, 2005, 10:01:20 PM
What to watch Tuesday
• TV's best reality show, The Amazing Race (CBS, Tuesday, 9 ET/PT), launches its Family Edition with a decent but less-than-amazing start that travels all the way from Brooklyn to Pennsylvania. The show has replaced its usual teams of two with teams of four, all family members. Only two of them, however, have small children.
Let's start with the good news. Tonight's premiere is free of the Rob-and-Amber-inspired, overly competitive ugliness that marred the last Race. Indeed, the 10 teams are cooperative, though you know that's bound to change.

As always, there is some internal bickering among the teams. But tonight at least, there are no scenes of parents screaming at kids — the kind of race-inspired bad behavior that had been a pre-Race concern. In fact, instead of child abuse, what you get tonight is parent abuse, particularly from two teenage boys who scream insults and orders at their mom and dad pretty much non-stop.

The real problem tonight isn't the racers, it's the race track. What's missing is the joy of travel and discovery, of interacting with other cultures and seeing new sights. By this time in the last Race, we were already zip-lining through the mountains of Peru. Somehow, crossing the Delaware in rowboats and pulling Amish buggies over a Pennsylvania farm just doesn't measure up. If you want to amaze us, folks, you'd better get moving.

http://www.usatoday.com/life/columnist/criticscorner/2005-09-26-critics-corner_x.htm
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 27, 2005, 01:12:46 PM
Anderson family competing in 'Amazing Race'

By Rick Bird
Post staff reporter

 
 
 Photo courtesy CBS
 
The Linz family of Cincinnati is fielding a team of siblings in “The Amazing Race: Family Edition.” It includes, from left, youngest brother Tommy, Megan, Alex and Nick.
 
 
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• Area native showing her grit on 'Survivor'

 
Terri Linz, 52, of Anderson Township, says she briefly considered joining her children as part of their team for "The Amazing Race."

"It was a passing thought. But it passed very quickly," she said with a laugh.

"As I have said, I myself have been on an 'amazing race' for the past 28 years."

Terri and her husband, Tom, have raised seven kids - six sons and a daughter - with the middle four selected to compete in CBS' "The Amazing Race: Family Edition," which has a two-hour debut at 9 tonight on WKRC-TV (Channel 12).

The Linz family team consists of:

Nick, 24, a salesman from Buffalo, N.Y.;

Alex, 23, an emergency room technician now living at home waiting on medical school applications;

Megan, 21, a junior at Miami University;

Tommy (aka "Bone"), 19, a sophomore at Miami.

In tonight's debut, part of which was made available for review, viewers will see a couple of Cincinnati-related T-shirt logos worn by the Linz team.

Bone sports a bright blue "St. X" T-shirt and there is a shot of Alex with an orange "Who Dey" shirt.

Terri says her children borrowed the Bengals' fan chant.

"They call themselves the 'Who Dey' team. They were yelling that when they were racing."

Terri said her sons all went to

St. Xavier High School. Megan is

a St. Ursula grad.

Viewers will see an easygoing hometown team they can root for. The Linz siblings come off as a fun group, often wise-cracking and good-naturedly cutting up with each other.

They even manage to get a classic fart joke in the debut. They seem competitive, but not to the point where they are going to let the heated, grueling race stop them from enjoying the experience.

"I think they gave it their best shot. They are all happy kids and competitive kids, if that's the edge," Terri said.

The series, a three-time Emmy winner for best reality show, seems to have hit on a winning concept with the family edition, which features 10 four-member teams with everyone somehow related, instead of the usual two-member teams.

For example, there are several families that include mom, dad and their two kids; also, a widow with her three daughters; a father with his three sons-in-law and a father with his three daughters.

The Linz team is one of just two made up entirely of siblings.

Terri says the family was actually recruited when a casting scout noticed the Linz clan on a family vacation last Christmas.

"Life's luck," she said.

"We were all on vacation in Cancun over the holidays and we really had not done that for years. We were at the airport waiting to come back to Cincinnati and a casting director mentioned the show to them and let them be aware of it, so they pursued it."

After sending off a DVD entry, the four were invited to Chicago for interviews.

Later, they were informed they had made the show and given a date earlier this summer to be ready, but were not told the destination until they arrived at the airport.

"They didn't know until the last minute when we put them on the plane where they were going," Terri said.

"The security man looked at me and said, 'Where are your kids going?' I said, 'You know what? I really have no idea.' He looked at me like, 'What kind of mother are you?' "

In fact, they went to New York City where this edition of "Amazing Race" starts out.

With the family theme, the initial destinations in Tuesday's debut include some down-home, Americana locations.

Having the Linz siblings on the reality show gives tri-state TV audiences two local favorites to root for on both of CBS' long-running, highly rated reality shows this season. Maysville native Cindy Hall, who has lived in Naples, Fla., the past 10 years, is a contestant on "Survivor Guatemala," which debuted Sept 15. (Please see story on Page 1.)

Cincinnati has often been CBS' No. 1 market for "Survivor" and "The Amazing Race."

A Channel 12 spokeswoman says Cincinnati was the highest-rated market for "Race" during its last edition. It has been a perennial leader for "Survivor," although the Cincinnati market dropped to ninth in the second episode last week after leading the nation in the Sept. 15 debut.

Terri Linz acknowledges she was only vaguely aware of "The Amazing Race" and never has watched it. She has been amazed at how many fans of the show she has run into who are excited about the local team.

"I'm finding neighbors, an old past friend, or a teacher who are saying, 'I saw your children are going to be on.'

"I've been blown away by so many people telling me it's one of their favorite shows."

Now Terri is gearing up for the emotional roller coaster ride any parent might expect to experience when their kids are on national TV: Will they live up to expectations?

"These are four very different personalities, so I think it's going to be pretty crazy," she said.

"I hope I'm not hiding wearing sunglasses when I walk around Cincinnati."

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050927/LIFE/509270343/1005
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 27, 2005, 01:14:27 PM
'Amazing Race' trekker has St. Petersburg ties
By CHASE SQUIRES, Times TV columnist
Published September 27, 2005

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CBS's The Amazing Race: Family Edition will feature a local rooting interest, but Tampa Bay area viewers might not even know it.

Among the family teams charging off across the globe in a race for a million dollars will be Linda Weaver of Ormond Beach and her three children, Rebecca, 19, Rachel, 16, and Rolly, 14.

But Weaver wasn't always a Weaver, and she wasn't always from Ormond Beach. Her mom, Lois Draper, said Weaver was raised in St. Petersburg and graduated from Northeast High School. Back then, she was Linda Scarbrough, one of Draper's four daughters, along with older sister Marcia and younger sisters Debbie and Marti.

Draper said her daughter is forbidden by CBS from doing interviews, but the network confirmed her identity.

In tonight's season premiere, airing at 9 on WTSP-Ch. 10, the Weaver family provides one of the most exciting moments, an encounter with an Amish buggy.

Weaver, 47, was widowed in February 2004 when her husband, Roy, was run over while picking up debris from the racetrack during an IPOWER Dash Series race at Daytona International Speedway, where he worked. She and her children discuss his death onscreen and share their religious faith; Weaver prays aloud twice during the first episode, asking for divine aid.

Draper said she isn't surprised to see her daughter on the show.

"She's such a vivacious type person, a daring type person, she'll try anything," Draper said. "I'm thrilled to death about it, but she can't tell me anything about how it comes out. Not a thing."

CBS cut short the preview episode mailed to critics in advance of tonight's airing, to keep the ending secret, but the Weavers were doing well leading up to the close.

Draper, who now lives in North Carolina, said her daughter moved from the area shortly after she was married 20 years ago.

* * *

One coincidence on Amazing Race highlights the continued underrepresentation of minorities on network reality shows. The only black family selected to compete is the Black family: Reggie and Kimberly Black, of Woodbridge, Va., and their sons, Kenneth and Austin. When any family is onscreen, producers identify them by posting the family name prominently in the lower right corner of the screen. So every time Reggie and Kimberly get screen time, viewers are reminded they're the "Black Family."

Ironic. Perhaps they could be identified as "the only black family."

http://www.sptimes.com/2005/09/27/Columns/_Amazing_Race__trekke.shtml
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 27, 2005, 01:15:26 PM
Ormond family begins 'Race'


Staff report

Last update: September 27, 2005


The "Race" is on for an Ormond Beach family.

Linda Weaver, 46, daughters Rebecca, 19, Rachel, 16, and son, 14-year-old Rolly, are contestants on the latest season of "The Amazing Race," which premieres tonight at 9 on CBS.

They are the family of Roy Weaver, a race track worker who was killed in an accident last year at Daytona International Speedway.

On the CBS Web site (www.CBS.com), Linda Weaver said she hoped the experience would "alleviate some of the heartache" the family has experienced.

The Weavers will compete against nine other families on "The Amazing Race." This "family edition" is a new twist for the popular show, which sends teams on a mad dash across the globe. The first across the finish line nets $1 million.

The Weavers have declined requests for interviews, citing confidentiality agreements that most reality show contestants are required to abide by. Simply put, they can't tell anyone how they fared.

Patrons of the Rockin' Ranch, where eldest daughter Rebecca tends bar, will gather to party, watch the show and cheer the family on, starting at 7 p.m. The Rockin' Ranch is at 801 S. Nova Road, Ormond Beach. For details, call (386) 673-0904.   

http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/Entertainment/Headlines/03SceneTV01092705.htm
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 27, 2005, 01:24:36 PM
Amazing Race is a family affairInstalment No. 8 of reality show debuts tonight
By BILL BRIOUX, SUN MEDIA

     
 

Children should be seen and not heard - but seen on The Amazing Race?

The top-rated reality series returns tonight with The Amazing Race 8: Family Edition (at 8 on CTV, Cable 2, and at 10 on CBS, Cable 6). The big twist: Four- instead of two-member teams, and all of the teammates have to be part of the same family. Some are traditional families (parents and kids), some blended families (newly married with stepkids). There are also four sisters, four brothers, engaged couples and in-laws.

At first, this idea makes total sense. Anybody who has ever tried to drive their entire family to, say, Disneyland from Edmonton and back again knows all about real drama. It's basically Survivor: The Home Edition.

Having screened most of tonight's premiere (CBS sent critics a tape missing the first-leg finish line), however, the idea isn't as much fun as I thought it would be.

The problem may be with the casting. Like all reality series, casting great villains, heroes and boneheads is key. More than half the fun of Amazing Race 7 was booing "Romber" (newlyweds "Boston" Rob and Amber) as they weaselled their way around the globe. They got screwed out of certain victory at the last minute when their flight was mysteriously held back - a happy ending for many Race fans.
 

That jerk Jonathan from Race 6 was another boo-able bad guy. Cousins Charla and Mirna made Race 5 a trip. Those knuckleheads Kevin and Drew were the original racing fools.

With one or two exceptions, the 10 teams that take part in tonight's Race all seem to hail from Blandville, U.S.A.

The biggest exception seems to be the Paolo family from Carmel, New York. Poppa Tony, who has a hard time tonight finding the Brooklyn Bridge, not to mention the state of Pennsylvania, hears nothing but abuse from his two jerky boys in the back seat, D.J., 24, and Brian, 16. Momma Marion referees.

The Black family, from Woodbridge, Virginia, stands out because it literally is the black family. Just in case you still can't tell them apart, they keep chanting, "Go Black Family!"

Another family, the Bransens of Illinois, consist of a dad and his three babe daughters. "I wanna be on that team," cracks a New York bystander.

A couple of families pack adorable tykes. The Gaghans of Connecticut featured Billy, 12, and Carissa, 9. They figure they've got a lock on this Race because they've already been all over Europe. Like they need another million bucks.

All 10 teams come off as one big happy family and that's not good - somebody has to play the bad guy.

The assumption is that the families toting tots are going to get trounced, but that may not be the case. Host Phil Keoghan states early on that pulling together as a family is more important this time than brute physical strength and stamina. Maybe that's true; little Billy and Carissa paddle like pros in tonight's bizarre Crossing the Delaware event, keeping their family near the top of the pack.

The ones who may need more stamina are the viewers. Speed is everything on The Amazing Race, which is cut like a rock video. Teams are flying off in all directions, scurrying in and out of planes, trains and automobiles. CBS keeps flashing their names, but I found it harder keeping track of these larger teams than with the usual couples concept.

Keeping the players straight should get easier as teams get eliminated and strong personalities emerge - if there are any. If the Paolos get turfed tonight, this Race will already have lost its comedy relief.

http://www.edmontonsun.com/Entertainment/Showbiz/2005/09/27/1237270-sun.html
Title: Early Show
Post by: puddin on September 27, 2005, 01:28:30 PM
'Race' Preps One Family For Storm

Sept. 27, 2005



'Amazing Race' Preview

 
The Schroeder family: Char and Mark with children, Hunter and Stassi. (Photo: CBS/The Early Show)

 
Char Schroeder (Photo: CBS/The Early Show)

 
Phil Keoghan, host of CBS Emmy winning series, 'The Amazing Race.' (Photo: Robert Voets/CBS )

 
 
(CBS) "The Amazing Race" returns to CBS Tuesday night with its first-ever family edition. Ten teams of four will race around the globe as fast as they can for $1 million.

For most of the contestants, it was the adventure of a lifetime, but for the Schroeder family of New Orleans, it turned out to be a dress rehearsal for Hurricane Katrina.

"I think it's a crazy phenomenon that a reality show would prepare you for real life," Char Schroeder says. "But the race absolutely prepared us."

As Hurricane Katrina headed toward New Orleans, the Schroeder family headed out of harm's way.

"When we left, we actually packed our race bags, and ran out with our race bags," she says.

The Schroeders took refuge with friends they met while taping "The Amazing Race," the Rogers family of Shreveport, La.

"The Rogers are the most sensitive and amazing family we ever met," Char Schroeder says.

"Race" host Phil Keoghan says it is a testament of what the show is all about and what makes the show different.

He says, "Having this family version, having teams of four, and families are just very different from, say, couples. We found that out going into this, there was a different kind of spirit on the race. And obviously that extended after the race. That's kind of nice."

Now living in a rental home near Baton Rouge, Mark Schroeder, his children Stassi and Hunter, and their stepmother Char wait to rebuild the home and life they left in New Orleans. The Early Show co-anchor Harry Smith accompanied Mark and Char as they returned for the first time to assess the damage.

Mark Schroeder notes, "We grew up on the lakefront and you think, "Is it ever going to be the same.'" Char Schroeder adds, "When we were driving in and seeing the houses, the devastation is so vast."

It was not the homecoming the Schroeders had hoped for. The house they built and moved into as newlyweds six years ago is just beginning to dry out.

"What's all the mud?" asks Char. "That's what came through the dog door and the mail slot," her husband answers.

Muddied floors and mold-stained walls are evident in every room - reminders that the floodwaters of Lake Pontchartrain once filled their home.

"We've been gone two weeks and if I didn't know any better I'd swear we've been gone two years," Mark Shchroeder says. "You know, the mold is going to grow. You just don't expect it to grow up the walls in a week or two."

As they continue to inspect their home, Char asks, "That was our leather sofa?"

"That was our leather sofa," answers her husband with a sad tone in his voice.

Most of what's left will be discarded. Spared were the items above water level: family photos on a shelf, artwork on the walls, many painted by Mark himself.

"Looks like the paintings are all OK," he says.

"Yeah, Venetian-Orleans," Char says.

The painting entitled Venetian-Orleans is Mark's interpretation of how his city would look after a great flood.

He says, "Prints were made of it and I was sending them to everyone in the race, and they were saying I was a prophet somehow. But if you look at the painting, the painting's upbeat. The parade is going on; Mardi Gras is going on; and people are having a good time."

Like his painting, and despite the damage done to the home he designed, Mark Schroeder is optimistic about both the future of New Orleans and his family.

He says, "We had the most wonderfully bonding experience in the world, and now we've had the most horrific bonding experience in the world. So, we couldn't get much closer."

The Schroeders can's say how they fared in the game but host Keoghan says the Schroeder young people, like the other children in the show, were able to hold their own in the competition. If anything, he says, the kids are more fit than some of the older people who have been in the show.

The Gaghan family, for example, is composed of "fitness freaks," Keoghan says. "I mean the youngest, who is 9, can run a seven-minute mile. I mean most 40-year-old men have bum knees and beer bellies and can't run seven-minute miles. On one hand, they're at a disadvantage because they are kids and they haven't got same sort of maturity. But if you want to just look at fitness and enthusiasm and energy, the Gaghan family is extremely fit and feisty."

Other families that viewers should watch out for are the Garluski sisters. "They are just loud, competitive. They range in age from 26 to 42," Keoghan says. "They talk over each other all the time. They love pink. Every time I would see them, they would be in these pink T-shirts. By the end of the first leg, they were rather smelly - I have to say. But, they're extremely loud and they're going to be a lot of fun to watch."

Also interesting to watch will be the Aiellos, he says. They are the father-in-law with the three sons-in-laws. "The sons have obviously married Tony's young daughters. They're out to prove they're worthy of taking their hands in marriage," Keoghan says.

The show has won its third consecutive Emmy for Best Reality Show. "We need to thank the fans for that. They're the ones that keep watching the show. We thank them for that," Keoghan says.

The host is also on tour promoting his book and the DVD of season one. Visit CBS.com to find out the places he will be visiting. "Ten cities. I just don't have my dad driving like I did last time. I'm actually flying."

"The Amazing Race: Family Edition" premieres with a special two-hour broadcast at 9 p.m. ET, 8 p.m. Central.
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 28, 2005, 07:17:28 PM
"Who Dey" In Amazing Race
Sep 26, 2005, 04:02 PM EDT  Email to a Friend  Printer Friendly Version   
 


CINCINNATI (AP) - A Cincinnati mom has four reasons to watch tomorrow night's season premiere of "The Amazing Race".

Four of Terry Linz' children, ranging in age from 19 up to 24, are contestants on the first "Family Edition" of the Emmy-winning reality program. They call themselves the "Who Dey" team, and viewers will see them making their way around the world proudly wearing Bengals' shirts.

Their mother says she'll watch the first episode in an undisclosed location with some company: about 200 other people.

C-B-S has asked her to keep the site a secret to help maintain the illusion that the race for a (m) million dollars is still under way. It was actually taped over the summer.

Linz says nobody's telling her whether her kids were the winners.

 

--- Information from: The Cincinnati Enquirer
http://www.fox19.com/Global/story.asp?S=3899557&nav=0zHF
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 28, 2005, 07:18:26 PM
 
Published September 28, 2005

Godlewski family race to amazing finish
The ultimate family adventure kicked off with a lot of feuding during last night's premiere episode of the Amazing Race: Family Edition.

As soon as a monetary prize is waved over people's heads, it's as if their competitive, better-than-thou genes take over and they get rude and obnoxious towards each other and everyone else around them.

This proved to be true at the start of the race in New York, where families like the Paolos kept budding heads and insulting each other. Not only were they bringing themselves down, but they were holding each other from moving forward.

Success in this game is all based on the competitors' ability to work together as a team, that's the only way for them to ensure they get to the finish line and pocket the $1 million US prize.

The 10 teams, each consisting of four players, had to drive to a sports store in Soho where they would purchase some camping gear as well as collect their first clue.

After a challenge that saw the teams take part in a traditional folding of the American flag, it was off to a park in Philadelphia where they would camp out overnight.

The next clue took the contestants to Mount Joy, Pennsylvania. There they came to a detour, which saw the teams have to complete one of two tasks — one was build it, where the competitors had to put together a house and the other was buggy it, that would see the teams pull a buggy across a field.

The Weaver family, a widow and three kids, partook in the buggy it task, but crashed going downhill after running over Linda, the kids' mother. Luckily for Linda, she fit right under the carriage and didn't get hurt. 

The difficulties of working together kept hovering over the Paolo family who were in a constant battle with each other.

"Do something else instead of looking at me like idiots," said Tony, Marion's husband and the father of DJ and Brian.

"This is getting really embarrassing now … I've had enough of this," said Marion after one of her sons called her annoying.

The teams then had to drive to the Rohrer Family Farm, a Mennonite Farm in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, which was the pit stop of this leg of the race. The last team to arrive, in this case it was the Black Family, would be eliminated.

The Godlewski Family took first place and were rewarded with a $20,000 prize.

Catch The Amazing Race: Family Edition Tuesday on CTV at 9 p.m.
 
http://www.metronews.ca/column_on_tv.asp?id=11144&cid=842
Title: Re: Team info & on-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 28, 2005, 07:19:25 PM
September 28, 2005
The Amazing Race Family Edition – The Cruel Irony Of It All
Early rumors about the Amazing Race Family Edition suggested that it would be a toned down version of the Amazing Race.  However, the premiere episode revealed that even through there might be an absence of exotic locales on this Amazing Race, the racers are still facing grueling and sometimes dangerous challenges.  Perhaps, the most interesting aspect of the Amazing Race Family Edition is that it seems to have a sense of cruel irony.

The most obvious irony is that the sole black family in the competition is actually named The Black Family.  The Black Family turns out to be one of the nicest families in the race.  Kimberley Black, the mother of The Black Family, states their philosophy as “You don’t have to hurt anybody to get ahead in life, and you don’t have to hurt anybody to win.”

One might also expect the teams with the youngest children to be at a huge disadvantage in the race.  However, the toughest competitor in the entire race just might be Carissa, the nine year old girl in the Gaghan Family.  Carissa Gaghan tells the camera, “I might be small but I’m not stupid.  I can trick any adult that’s trying to trick me.” 

The families start the race in New York, and the first family to get really lost is the Palao family.  Ironically, the Palao Family is also the only family actually from New York in the competition.  One of the first stops for the families is to pick up a clue at a frankfurter stand.  The operators of the frankfurter stand turn out to be Kevin & Drew from the Amazing Race 1.  Ironically, only one racer appears to actually recognize Kevin & Drew. 

The first major challenge the families face is to cross the Delaware river and retrieve an American flag.  The river guides warns The Black Family to paddle up river because the currents are strong.  Ironically, they appear to be the only family to get the warning and the only family to get caught in the currents.

After camping overnight in Fairmount Park in Philadelphia, the families have a detour choice between “buggy it” and “build it.”  In “buggy it,” the families have to push and pull an Amish buggy.  In “build it,” the families have to build a working water mill.  The Weaver Family loses control of their buggy and in the cruelest irony of all the buggy actually runs over Linda Weaver.  Of course this series of events was terrifying for the Weaver children, who lost their father when he was run over by a race car while retrieving debris from the Daytona International Speedway. 

The Gaghan Family makes up time in the buggy challenge, and in one of the funniest moments of the premiere, the two young children sing “She’ll Be Coming Around The Mountain” as they pass the all male and more athletic Aiello Family. 

The Gaghan Family has a lot of competitive drive as they try to reach the pit stop first, but they are passed by the Godlewski Family, who are first to check-in and win $20,000.  The Linz Family and The Black Family wind up in a footrace to avoid being last to the check-in point.  The Black Family is the last team to arrive and is eliminated from the Amazing Race.  We guess the moral of this episode is maybe a strategy of not hurting anybody doesn’t translate into winning in the Amazing Race.

http://www.realitytvmagazine.com/blog/2005/09/the_amazing_rac_2.html
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on September 30, 2005, 02:49:14 PM
Aiellos still in 'The Race'
By Donna Whitehead

Friday, September 30, 2005
(http://www2.townonline.com/images/Mansfield/amazing09302005.jpg)Tony Aiello watched the premiere of 'The Amazing Race' Tuesday at Jimmy’s Pub with his family.
Mansfield resident Tony Aiello, his wife, Barbara and their children gathered at Jimmy's Pub Tuesday night to watch Tony and his sons-in-law compete in CBS' "The Amazing Race."
 
     The Aiello team includes his sons-in-law, Kevin Kempskie and Matt Hanson of Bellingham, and David Alverson of Providence, R.I.
 
     The Mansfield men made it through the two-hour premiere episode. They traveled through New York City, crossed the Delaware River, camped out and dragged an Amish buggy through the Pennsylvania countryside. They finished the episode in eighth place after getting lost on the way to Lancaster, Pa., but will still be in the race when the show's next episode airs.
 
     Those interested in following Team Aiello can check out the show at www.cbs.com.

http://www2.townonline.com/mansfield/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=337225
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: Chateau d If on September 30, 2005, 04:08:13 PM
So, did they turn left or right out of the Brubaker Farm?

From the team sort link (http://homepage.mac.com/yakc/tv/tar8.html) that's where they lose a lot.
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on October 01, 2005, 12:42:55 AM
On the insider clip all they said was they were lost and had a hard time finding the Pitstop ..no details .
For Windows Media Player ~

http://cgi.cbs.com/vplayer/timeplay.pl?type=wmv&id=15466
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on October 02, 2005, 01:45:35 AM
Amazing Race -- Family Edition
During this edition of The Amazing Race, we are keeping track of two families: the Bransen family of Park Ridge and the Godlewski family of Des Plaines.
Virginia Soto,
COMPARING THE BRANSENS AND THE GODLEWSKIS:

The Chicago contestants are seven blonde women and one white-haired guy. Four sisters in one family and three sisters in the other. Which means it's going to take a while for us to tell them apart (the fact that the Godlewski sisters all wore pink shirts throughout most of the show made things even worse).
Let's hope the two families last long enough to give us time to differentiate those seven ladies...

The Bransen girls are Lindsay (20), Lauren (22), and Beth (25). The Godlewski sisters are older: Tricia (26), Christine (37), Sharon (39), and Michelle (41). They also seem to come from different financial backgrounds: while the Bransens are seen playing croquet, the Godlewskis are shown playing pool. To make the difference between the two families more striking: Walter Bransen says his daughters will always be his "little girls." But when some of the conversation turns to the Godlewski sisters, you hear comments such as "silicone implants," "smokers," (both of these comments came from Mark Schroeder) "strong flirts," and the like.

During this first episode, the Bransens went unnoticed by almost everyone, except the hot dog vendors (Drew and Kevin from the first edition of The Amazing Race, who said after looking at two of the sisters that was one team they'd like to be on), and the Schroeders who did say the Bransens could be a tough team to defeat. The Godlewskis, on the other hand, were noticed by almost everybody and interacted with a bunch of people (some of the other families even came up with nicknames for them: the Weavers nicknamed them "the Desperate Housewives" and the Schroeders "the Pink Ladies"). The Godlewskis seemed to be not only respected but liked by most of the other contestants, who followed them when they could and even helped the Godlewski sisters build their tent when they arrived late at the Belmont Plateau.
THE BRANSEN FAMILY:

Lauren is identified by Lindsey as the weakest link, or as Lindsey puts it, the "girliest" of the three. But, says Lindsey, Lauren is also the most organized and positive of the sisters.

The three Bransen girls like to joke around and tease each other. They say they call their father "Waldur" and make him the object of their jokes. According to the father, they plan to have fun while participating on The Amazing Race (unfortunately, this may turn out to be their downfall; if you look at the scenery instead of the road signs, you are bound to get lost.)

How did the Bransens do? They were among the last to leave Fulton Ferry State Park in Brooklyn and they were the seventh team to arrive at the Eastern Mountain Sports in SoHo. Then, they were sixth to arrive at the "frank" (hot dog stand) on 91st between Park and Lexington (the father let one of the daughters drive on the way there and she proved quite adept, not letting the Weavers pass her as she drove). Despite this, they still arrived second at Washington Crossing in Pennsylvania (after the Aiellos). How did they manage such a feat? During this leg of the race, the Bransens stopped to ask for directions and to buy a map. BUT, since they asked for directions and bought a map at the beginning of the race and they ended up in sixth/seventh place, that couldn't have been it, or at least, not entirely. For some reason, the producers of The Amazing Race are not focusing their cameras on this family, so a lot of what we say about them has to be learned through deduction (if not downright guesswork). They might have been scared by their poor showing and decided to pay attention. Or they might have gotten good really good directions from whomever they asked. Whatever they reason, once they arrived at the river, the girls, obviously in better shape than their dad, told their father to "Hustle, Wally." (What happened to the "Waldur" nickname?) At the crossing, the teams needed to row a boat across the river to the New Jersey shore and retrieve a Revolutionary flag before returning to the Pennsylvania side of the river. The moment the Bransens got in their boat, however, they became stuck. The father jumped out to see what the problem was, which allowed the Aiellos to move far ahead of them. Still, the moment the boat became unstuck, the Bransens seemed to catch up, which means they must be quite strong physically. Unfortunately, after Lauren retrieved the flag and the Bransens began rowing again, they started losing ground to the Aiellos once more.
Maybe the girls had become tired from the physical exertion it took to row the boat that first time -- or at least Lindsay did, since she seemed to be the one taking the brunt of Walter's criticism. The girls told the father to calm down, and after the family finally made it back to the Pennsylvania side of the river (still in second place), they were instructed to drive 34 miles to Philadelphia and find Belmont Plateau, where they would be camping for the night.On their way there, the Bransens got stuck in traffic and they might have gotten lost again, making them come in fourth place, meaning they would leave the next day at 10:30 am instead of 10:00 am. The next morning, a heavy rain falling, they were told to drive 92 miles to Mount Joy, PA to the Brubaker Farms, where they would have to choose their first Detour, "Build It," or "Buggy It." The Bransens apparently got lost AGAIN. We were shown shots of them asking for directions and then we saw them arriving at the Brubaker Farms after the Linzes and the Godlewskis, both of whom left Belmont Plateau half an hour after the Bransens did. Once they got there, however, the Bransens chose to build the watermill (the most popular of the two Detour choices), and did well, finishing the Detour in fourth position. They then had to travel to the Pit Stop at Blue Rock Road and look for the twin, blue silos in the Rohrer Farm, a Mennonite farm in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The last team to arrive would be eliminated. As the Bransens left Brubaker Farms on their way to Lancaster, Walter mentioned that he thought they're going the wrong way. Lost again. Oh, well. The Bransens finally reached the Pit Stop in seventh place. The family hugged when Phil told them they were still in the race.

How do I think the Bransens are going to do? As is obvious from the recap above, the Bransens' problem is that they have a tendency to get lost when driving around looking for their next clue, a MAJOR roadblock on the way to getting a million dollars on a show like The Amazing Race. WHY they get lost is hard to tell since it wasn't shown on this episode. The producers must have thought it wasn't interesting enough. (I guess that means that when the Bransens get lost, they don't bicker amongst themselves the way the Paolos do; something to be thankful for.) Except for their second-place finish during the Washington Crossing part of the episode, the Bransens were in the middle of the pack most of the time, and most of those times they were either in sixth or seventh place, a very poor showing when there are only ten teams competing. In other words, their future at this point doesn't look too promising. The one ray of hope is that the family analyzed what they did wrong and came up with some ideas to change things for the next leg of the race. As one of the Bransen girls explained, they tend to get distracted watching what the other teams are doing (instead of forgetting about the other families and concentrating on the job at hand), and thus tend to stress out too much.

The Godlewski sisters think their main attribute is that they are going to be underestimated by the other teams. Everybody is going to think of them as dumb blondes and not pay attention to them. (Of course, this "We're going to be underestimated" mantra is something every reality show contestant seems to say at the beginning of every reality show.)

How did they do? From the very beginning, the Godlewski sisters showed that they were a team that had to be taken seriously.

Even though the Gaghans were the first to pack up their car at Fulton Ferry State Park in Brooklyn on the way to Eastern Mountain Sports in SoHo, and the Godlewskis were among the last, next time we saw them, the Godlewskis had already caught up to the Gaghans and were driving behind them (the Godlewskis got stuck at a light the Gaghans managed to make). How did they do it? Well, in one instance, we see second (from the top) sister Sharon, 39, driving the wrong way in a New York City street. (To be fair to Sharon, she might have been following the Weavers and not have realized the mess she was getting into.) They also got a map (smart move), and ended up leaving the store in fourth place. Then they arrived at the frank in fourth place, showing that once they move up, they can keep their momentum. At the hot dog stand, Christine was the one who got the clue. The sisters all said they had been very lucky, and at this point, we hadn't seen enough of the show to know if this was true or if they were just being polite. We could tell, however, that they Godlewski sisters were very excited about their chances by the way they talked about New York and about how much they loved the place and how much fun they were having (if they had been dispirited, they probably wouldn't have liked the place that much). After leaving the hot dog stand, the Godlewskis managed to find the George Washington Bridge quite fast. They were now in second place. It's after crossing the bridge that the very capable Godlewski sisters lost track of where they were and got lost (the Chicago plague, we're going to call it, even though the Godlewskis, unlike the Bransens only got lost once). Fortunately for the Godlewskis, the Schroeder family had been following them, so the Godlewskis didn't panic, feeling that if this was an elimination leg, there was still a chance they could make it. (Unbeknownst to them, the Paolo and Linz families were lost, too.) When the Godlewskis reluctantly told each other that they were going to have to turn around and leave "the scenic route" (as the sisters called the road they were on), the Schroeders asked them if they were lost. The Godlewskis admitted to them that they were. The Schroeders, furious, decided to take off and go their own way. It was late by the time the Godlewskis arrived at Washington Crossing. Sharon got all wet retrieving the flag and had to rinse her shirt. By the time the Godlewskis arrived at Belmont Plateau, it was dark. Just about everybody helped the Godlewski sisters set up their tent, and they ended up in eighth place and got a starting time of 11:00 am. The sisters thanked the other contestants for their help by offering them chocolate chip cookies. The next morning, when they left for the Brubaker Farm, the Godlewskis were followed by the Linzes. In the end, it proved beneficial for the Godlewskis, since it was the Linzes who found the farm (it was the Godlewskis who found Mount Joy, though). The Godlewskis once again had moved up in the standings, from eighth to five. By the time they finished the Detour they were in second place. The Godlewskis bickered amongst themselves over the quickest route to take to get to the Pit Stop. Ultimately, their quarreling worked, as the Godlewski sisters stepped onto the mat in first place, screaming and cheering wildly (Phil asked them if they always talked over each other). Phil informed the sisters they had won $20,000 for their victory, which meant even more shrieking and cheering.

How do I think they are going to do? I think this first episode shows that the Godlewski sisters not only have great tenacity, but also have an incredible capacity to move ahead in the game. At the Fulton Ferry State Park, they were among the last to leave and yet immediately they moved to the front of the pack. After they got lost finding Washington Crossing and were again at the bottom of the pack, again they immediately moved up and managed to finish first, an INCREDIBLE feat. I think that the Godlewskis are THE team to beat in this competition.

A little aside: I heard someone say that the way the Godlewski sisters praised each other and kept telling the one doing the driving, "You're doing great!" could be as annoying as the Paolos fighting. I don't think so. The Godlewskis went from last to first, so obviously they weren't lying when they praised their sister's driving skills. And they were caught on camera bickering as well, so it's obvious these girls mean what they say.
ABOUT THE AMAZING RACE IN GENERAL:

Phil Keoghan has guaranteed us (the viewers) some "good entertainment" in this edition of The
Amazing
 
I would love for him to explain what he meant by that. As people have noted before, The Amazing Race is a show that did not become a hit with the fans until the fifth season, when some changes took place. As Phil himself said, "If there was a weakness to The Amazing Race in the beginning, it was that there was nothing nasty about it, because trainwreck TV works. But people are now turning towards shows like The Amazing Race. It is doing better now than when it was launched -- it's huge." To make a show work you need "colorful" characters. People like, well, "Boston" Rob Mariano. Except The Amazing Race didn't want to bring "famous" or "well-known" people. "People like to see fresh faces. They like to watch ordinary people do extraordinary things," said Phil in an interview to MSNBC. So what did the The Amazing Race producers do? They brought on people like "hardcore and aggressive" Mark Schroeder (their "ordinary" answer to Rob Mariano, I guess), and the Paolo family (their "ordinary" answer to a train wreck). I really think the producers have missed big with their casting choices for this edition of the The Amazing Race. "Boston" Rob might have been cocky. He might have been rude. But he also had a lot of things going for him. He could make things happen. He was a winner. The Paolos are losers. Kids insulting their parents? That's what you call "good entertainment"? Sorry, Phil, but you need to get yourself a new dictionary

http://chicago.about.com/od/newspapersradiotv/a/092705_race.htm
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on October 04, 2005, 10:49:04 AM
'Amazing' family reflects


By EMILY BROWN
ebrown@potomacnews.com
Tuesday, October 4, 2005


Even though they still squirm and grimace watching their one and only episode of “The Amazing Race: Family Edition” or one of the many interviews they’ve done since, the Blacks of Woodbridge are thankful they had a chance to show their family the world, and the world their family.

In a competitive show, which sends 10 teams of four related persons on an international scavenger hunt for $1 million, the Blacks left a muddy footprint on viewers with their understated but clearly visible unity.

“I just think it’s refreshing to see a family that loves each other,” said Kimberly Black.

They may have been the first to leave, but the Blacks - Reggie, 42, Kimberly, 40, Kenneth, 11, and Austin, 8 - were also the first to walk away with life lessons.

An overwhelming outpouring in the last week has won the Blacks plenty of national and regional media attention, a free meal in an airport and letters from well-wishers across the country.

“The best thing about all of this is it teaches the boys you get rewarded for doing the right thing,” said Kimberly, a fifth-grade teacher at Douglas MacArthur Elementary School in Alexandria.

Before the show’s 30-day taping this summer, the family talked about teamwork, supporting one another, following directions and doing the right thing, she said. They also prepared to say goodbye to their 2-year-old Jordan, as he stayed with his godmother through the taping.

During taping, they never knew if they were in first place or last, said Reggie, a math teacher at West Potomac High School in Alexandria. They underestimated the speed of the race and tried to stay cool - maybe too cool, he says now - and focus on the task at hand.

The race took them through New York’s Soho Village and onto Pennsylvania. They rowed against a strong current in the Delaware River, they found a campsite in Philadelphia. Because of their positioning, seventh at the time, the family had a later starting time in the morning.

The next day they raced to Mount Joy, Pa., where they opted to build a working water wheel over pushing each other a mile and a half in an Amish buggy.

The choice was suited for the family, they all agreed. Austin, a fourth-grader at Douglas MacArthur, liked the idea because it was life-size, not a table model. Kenneth, a Beville Middle School sixth-grader, said he likes to dig.

“They had the eyes for it, believe it or not,” Reggie said. “They engineered it, we just put it together.”

There was never a point in the race where they thought they were finished, but their effort came up short when they were the last team to arrive at a farm in Lancaster, Pa.

“I was really disappointed and sad,” Kenneth said. “We sent Jordan away for a long time and I was sad because we were the first ones out.”

Viewers never had the chance to see the family’s drive and competitiveness, added his father. The family takes Tae Kwon Do classes together at Jhoon Rhee Institute in Woodbridge.

But since the show last week, fans have had an opportunity to hear from the Blacks through countless television, radio and print interviews, including a dozen radio interviews in three hours Monday morning.

Last week they watched the show’s premier episode crowded around a hotel TV in New York City so they could be in the city for a CBS “The Early Show” interview the next morning.

The Blacks felt pretty special: a limo to the airport, a flight to New York on short notice, a downtown hotel room. In the show’s seven previous seasons, none of the first five eliminated teams were interviewed on the news the next morning, Kimberly said.


Then again, everything about their experience with reality television makes them feel pretty special.

“It was a rewarding feeling to know you represented your family and your hometown and you did a good job,” Reggie said.

http://www.potomacnews.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WPN%2FMGArticle%2FWPN_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031785432926&path=
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on October 04, 2005, 11:30:04 AM
Hope student joins 'Amazing Race'
Tuesday, October 04, 2005
By Colleen Pierson
The Grand Rapids Press
HOLLAND -- Lindsay Bransen, a junior at Hope College, finds herself racing from class to class, working on her major in social work.

But that's not the only race she has been involved in lately.

Bransen competed on the Emmy-award-winning CBS reality show, "The Amazing Race." The show, which began a new season last week, puts contestants on a fast-paced adventure to $1 million.
Two-person teams of couples or friends typically are featured on the reality show, but this season the teams are families. It is the first time in eight seasons the usual 11 teams of two have become 10 families of four.

Standing near New York Harbor, host Phil Keoghan greeted the families on the opening episode. After his traditional eyebrow raise and arm signal, the teams frantically dashed to their first clue waiting alongside their bags.

Last Tuesday's premiere showed the families starting in New York City, crossing the Delaware River and ending up in Lancaster, Pa.

West Michigan connection

The Bransen family team, from Park Ridge, Ill., features proud pop Walter, 51, and his three beautiful blonde daughters who were in a Pert shampoo commercial a couple of years ago. His 22-year-old daughter Lauren recently graduated from Hope College while Lindsay, 20, is a student there. The eldest daughter Elizabeth, 25, completes the team.

When contacted by The Press, Lindsay said she wasn't allowed to say anything about her experiences on the show. Mom Judy could, though.

"I don't watch much TV and don't care much for most reality TV programs, but no way will I miss a minute of this show," she said.

The proud mom watched the opening episode with family and friends (including 11 Hope College friends of Lindsay's) at a Chicago restaurant.

She said the audition process of competing against 20,000 other applicants was grueling, but the family made it through cut after cut.

"They had to complete numerous aptitude, personality and I.Q. tests before the final meeting with the head of CBS-TV, where they were told they had finally made the show," she said
Family traits

According to the show's Web site, Walter admits to being the self-proclaimed leader of the group.

Married for 31 years, he works as a CFO and is a native of Chicago. He describes himself as reserved and analytical. He is also a history buff who is especially knowledgeable about Abraham Lincoln.

Elizabeth recently received a master's in social work from the University of Illinois. She and Walter have similar personalities, and sometimes their stubbornness causes friction..

Lauren earned a bachelor's degree in communications and business management from Hope College. Punctual and adaptable, Lauren admits she can be impatient.

Lindsay, the youngest of the sisters, teases that her older sisters are always telling her what to do.

Mom Judy says she thinks the team will do well together because they are very close, and there is great chemistry between the girls and Dad.

"This is a really good show, the premise is nice, and it isn't off color. Contestants need to rely on instinct -- one wrong turn and they can move from second place to last.

"I was nervous that they might get eliminated, but they came in seventh place on the first episode," Judy Bransen said.

http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/grpress/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/112843724514900.xml&coll=6&thispage=1
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on October 10, 2005, 10:01:44 PM
Last update: October 10, 2005 at 5:31 PM
Kids are leading the way -- 'Amazing'
Neal Justin,  Star Tribune
October 11, 2005 AMAZING1011
 
 
 
Reality TV makes for a poor children's playground, unless you believe the future of America will depend on diving into vats of spiders, living off cold rice on a desert island or making out with complete strangers.

But "The Amazing Race," which last month won its third Emmy in a row for best reality program, is one of the few G-rated shows left on broadcast television, which makes this season's family edition an appropriate, and delightful, twist.

It features 10 teams of four related members, racing across the world for a $1 million prize. Among the competitors: 9-year-old blond Carissa Gaghan and 8-year-old Austin Black. In the early days of the contest, families crossed the Delaware River by boat, built a water wheel in Amish country and participated in a Civil War reenactment.

season premiere of "The Amazing Race: Family Edition."Robert VoetsCbsTo date, no one has eaten sushi off a naked woman or had to deal with Corey Feldman. And it's unlikely anyone will.

"We've never relied on exploiting people," said host Phil Keoghan, who was in Minneapolis last week promoting the show and his book "No Opportunity Wasted," a self-help manual. "It's a feel-good show."

That description contributed to the show's slow start out of the gate. Since its premiere in 2001, the show has struggled to attract the kind of ratings and media attention that goes to more sinister fare.

The series didn't attain gold-medal ratings until last season (the show's seventh) when conniving "Survivor" veterans Rob Mariano and Amber Brkich were added to the mix.

Rob and Amber aren't exactly role models for kids. In the current edition, one family features two sons who constantly belittle their mother.

But Keoghan said he's not worried about exposing young competitors -- and young viewers -- to all kinds of personalities.

"We choose people who are representative of people in everyday life and not everyone is politically correct," he said. "It's a cruel fact of life. You can't protect them from everything. There are lessons that have to be learned."

Some of those lessons are being taught by the junior participants. In a future episode, a feud develops between two teams and it's the kids who attempt to bridge the gap.

"There's a different kind of energy in this race," Koeghan said. "At the first pit stop, families were going out of their way to help other families. Kids were opening their parents' eyes to the idea of sharing."

Koeghan says one sixth-grade class in Cincinnati has been using the program in its lessons about behavior and morals.

Some core fans have expressed concern that the show may be tamed down this season. Koeghan admits that some past challenges probably wouldn't be allowed this time around (the parachute jumping comes to mind), but he said "Race" is safer than it looks.

"We know the rope they're swinging on is safe because we've tested it 3,000 times," he said. "The most dangerous thing we do is when we allow teams behind the wheel or in a taxi. That's when we lose control."

Koeghan is a little off. The most dangerous stunt in the show's history is inviting kids to participate. If it succeeds, expect a lot more family fun in the future. If it flops, stay tuned for increased bickering.


.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/459/5653358.html
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on October 13, 2005, 11:30:56 PM
From some pretty reliable spoiler information posted on various boards since July 7 it now looks like all TEN teams make it to Huntsville, Alambama (NASA space camp?) at the end of which will be the FIRSTelimination. So that is going to be a douzzy of an opening show on September 27: New York, New Jersey, Washington, DC, South Carolina to Huntsville, Alabama!

From the descriptions and other pretty reliable sightings in Toronto and Montreal it looks like the four Godlewski Sisters make it that far (a team of four girls was spotted in downtown Toronoto) and either the Weavers or Bransens also make it to Montreal (team with adult and three children spotted but not further identified.) Also it looks like the Black Family does not make it to the final five (all white familes supposedly spotted.)

Gman ..do you know where the "Montreal (team with adult and three children spotted but not further identified." came from ?
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: Slowhatch on October 25, 2005, 12:52:48 AM
Score another success for gringo reality (http://www.critica.com.pa/archivo/10232005/vivarevista.html). You can translate the article with google, but there's not much useful info, except for the local company they used--Verite Productions (http://www.veriteproducciones.com/index_eng.htm).
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on October 25, 2005, 01:00:13 AM
Slowhatch  ..thanks you  |#' , if I'm reading this right filming was over 3 days ??

Panama reality


Writing | Live, Critic in line


 

International production.


Panama becomes scene of an international___ production again, as soon as they were filmed, some chapters of reality show__ Amazing Race, three winning series of Emmys.

Amazing Race __Panama___ was recorded ____in attractive leases around the capital and will show to the tourist___ enchantments and the ___economic dynamism in the creeks of the Panama Canal.

The program was co-produced by the equipment of Verite Productions, Panamanian__ tens___ of producers and professionals who collaborated, during three days with recognized the producing North Americans Bertram van Munster and Elise Doganieri de World Race Productions.
This program is one of most popular of the television in the United States, with a hearing considered in 70 million people.

Amazing Race consists of teams of participants who discover tracks that take them sites to different from interest. Throughout their passage by the world disqualifications take place while the winners approach the longed for prize of a million dollars.

This Tuesday 25, chain CBS releases the chapter filmed in our country and it will be possible to be seen in Panama by Channel 78 of the Cable.
 
translated with altavista ..




Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on October 27, 2005, 01:18:33 AM
Boroughwide News October 13, 2005 
 
 
Bronx sanitation worker takes family on CBS’ Amazing Race
by Jon Minners


 
Bronx Sanitation worker Tony Paolo, his wife and two sons are one of 10 families competing for $1 million on the hit CBS reality series Amazing Race. 
 
Talk about your ultimate vacations. One of the Dept. of Sanitation’s Bronx employees has taken his family on a trip throughout North America as part of a special version of the three-time Emmy award winning reality series Amazing Race.

Tony Paolo, who grew up in Italy, moved to the Bronx and is now a Sanitation worker with a trash pickup route in Country Club, has joined his wife Marion and two sons, DJ and Brian, as one of 10 families that will battle it out on television every Tuesday night in a race through various countries for a $1 million prize.

“This was a dream come true for our family,” said Tony’s sister Donna Murano, of Country Club, the spokesperson for the family, who cannot speak until they have either been eliminated from the contest or are announced the winners. “His wife is such a devoted fan of the show and has been watching since it first aired,” Murano continued. “She saw that they were looking for families and they decided to take a chance.”

The Paolo family filled out an application from the show’s website and then shot a video to be sent to CBS for possible selection. DJ was not involved in the original video. The oldest son had just recovered from breaking his ankle and was worried he would hold the team back, so Murano’s eldest daughter filled in, but upon viewing the video and reading the profile about the family, representatives from Amazing Race: Family Edition asked that the Paolos to reconsider using DJ in the contest. The video was re-shot and the Paolos were selected as one of the families in the show.

“They couldn’t believe it,” said Murano. “They were so excited, but they couldn’t talk about it. It was sort of an underground happiness. They could not discuss it at all and they told everyone they were just going on vacation. They were gone the entire month of July to shoot the show and when we found out about it and saw them on television, it was just a wonderful sight---very surreal.”

According to the show’s website, producers see the Paolos as a family that frequently bickers, but loves each other very much. Tony, 52, describes himself as a hardworking and charismatic and says the most exciting moment of his life was coming to the United States from Italy. Marion, 52, is a proud homemaker who considers herself to be persevering and hardheaded. Her biggest pet peeve about Tony is that he lets his sons get away with too much.

DJ, 24, works in title report production and is spontaneous and stubborn. He admits to having a fear of heights as well as a big mouth. His brother, Brian, 16, is entering his senior year of high school and is painfully embarrassed by his family. He’s convinced he’s the only sane one in the bunch. Both sons think their mother will not be able to last long in the race.

These traits were on display throughout the first two episodes, but was the Paolo family fairly depicted? “There was a lot of editing done,” said Murano. “They admitted to bickering a lot, but they could have shown the viewing audience how they were when they were not arguing. I guess it is to be expected. This is television and you have to make it exciting, but we are very passionate people and when we make up, we are just as passionate as when we argue. Hopefully, viewers will get to see that as the shows go on.”

Murano has no idea how her family did in the race. She watched, just like everyone else, as the 10 families readied themselves for the start of the race in Manhattan, finding their way through crowded streets, searching for clues and overcoming obstacles and challenges as they go from one location to the next. In Pennsylvania, families had to paddle a rowboat across the Delaware River, the same spot General George Washington famously crossed during the Revolutionary War. Families then had to choose between building a miniature working water mill or pulling a traditional Amish buggy along a 1.5-mile course.

Watching it all unfold was an unnerving experience for Murano. “It is so strange,” she said. “I get together with my sister, and our two families have watched the show for the past few weeks. We were on pins and needles the whole time. They were in last place the whole time, fighting not to be eliminated and we were like, ‘Oh Lord, they are not going to make it,’ but they always pulled it off. They are still on the show, but it is so nerve wracking. You don’t want to watch, but then you can’t help, but to watch.”

As for their chances: “I don’t have a clue,” said Murano. “Tony’s a garbage man. He’s strong and he walks a lot. I am rooting them on and I hope they win it all, but either way, I am just so proud of them.”

Amazing Race can be seen locally on Tuesdays at 8 p.m. on Channel 2. For more information, go to www.cbs.com.

 
http://www.bxtimes.com/news/2005/1013/Boroughwide_News/016.html
 
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: Slowhatch on October 31, 2005, 02:30:22 AM
 (:;) Linking is messed up again. Google "keoghan site:geokids.com" and click on the TAR link for an article that includes a story I hadn't heard before: how BVM was robbed in India of ...nearly everything.
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on October 31, 2005, 10:22:31 AM
Your right Slowhatch ..the link won't work so heres your article  :kuss: , good read .


Adventure Travel 2006: Amazing Travel Tips
Text by Brad Wieners    Additional reporting by Claire Stanford 

Premise: If anyone can tell you how to travel outside your comfort zone, embrace risk, and come back alive, it's the creators, host, and winners of TV's The Amazing Race

"Above all, know that the world is really a very safe place."
—The Amazing Race cocreator  Bertram van Munster

Read the 12 Travel Tips >>

Out of the gate it looked as if The Amazing Race, the adventure-travel reality-TV show that made its debut September 5, 2001, on CBS, might end up a one-season wonder. "When I saw the billboards [advertising the series] in lower Manhattan coated in ash from the World Trade Center, I really thought we were in trouble," recalls the program's cocreator Bertram van Munster. "I mean, who would want to watch a show with all these airplanes?"
 
Instead of packing it in, The Amazing Race has taken flight and managed over seven subsequent seasons to sustain a word-of-mouth rep as "the thinking person's reality-TV show," even though that sounds oxymoronic to some thinking persons. During each 13-episode run, 11 duos vied for a cool million in cash. (The show's fall format has ten teams of four extended family members.) By the time it's over, the racers have completed up to 30 scavenger hunts, physical or phobia-related challenges, and culturally specific rituals—all while circumnavigating the globe in 29 to 30 days.
 
It's easy to see why the show has enjoyed a warm critical response: It keeps its reality quotient high, putting everyone, from the contestants to producers to the show's host, Phil Keoghan, out in the chaos of the world. Because it's a race, there's often no chance for a second or third take; the camera crews either get the shot, or they don't. And the clock is ticking for all involved.
 
"People ask me, 'What do you do when you're not talking?'" says Keoghan, 37, an avid snowboarder and career adventurer. "And they ask as if I've got time on my hands! But the only difference between me and the teams is I know where I'm going next and they don't."
 
The finish times for the racers can be as far apart as 12 hours, in which case Keoghan has to cool his jets, wait for the last stragglers to check in, and then hustle to keep pace with the front-runners. Often, he'll fall behind the leaders but leapfrog them while they are distracted by a preset "detour." At least half a dozen times, and most notably in Botswana, Keoghan has been running flat out to reach the finish line (a logo'd reception mat) just ahead of the contestants. "For the teams, it's a series of 13 sprints, while for those of us working on the show it's a month-long marathon," Keoghan says.
 
"It boils down to a show about relationships," says van Munster, who immigrated to the United States from the Netherlands. "Everyone can relate to the bickering that happens because that's what happens when you travel with somebody." Once a cameraman for National Geographic television, van Munster is best known for his work on Cops; Wild Things, a short-lived, but influential nature series; and Profiles From the Front Line. The idea for The Amazing Race, he says, came from his wife and coexecutive producer Elise Doganieri. "After college, Elise went on a trip, backpacking for a year with her best friend. They got in a huge fight," he laughs. "But of course she remembers it as the time of her life."
 
Perhaps the most exceptional thing about The Amazing Race is its inviting worldview. "It seems like all we ever see of the rest of the world is the aftermath of a natural disaster, war, or someone who hates us, burning an American flag," says the expat New Zealander Keoghan, who resides with his wife and daughter in Santa Monica, California. He adds, "Our President is constantly warning people about all the 'evildoers' out there. It's no wonder some Americans think they'll be safer staying home."
 
Say what you like about The Amazing Race: that its appealing images of exotic locales act as an antidote to war-on-terror hysteria, or that what the show really delivers is a spot-on satire of the breakneck speed at which Americans travel. Either way, the folks responsible for staging the race indisputably know their way around. Doganieri and van Munster typically travel the 35,000-mile (56,327-kilometer) itinerary of the race twice, and sometimes three times, before each contest gets under way. In all, they've visited more than 70 countries, ironing out all the logistics of the show. Their travel savvy, along with advice from Keoghan and season-seven winners Joyce and Uchenna Robinson-Agu, follows. You needn't be racing to put it to good use.
 
12 Travel Tips From The Amazing Race
By Phil Keoghan

1. Face your fear. At 19, Keoghan nearly died when he was trapped inside a shipwreck off the coast of New Zealand during a deepwater dive. Once rescued, he wrote out a "life list" of adventures he wanted to have before he really did cross over and then got paid to do many of them as the go-anywhere, try-anything host of TV magazines Phil Keoghan's Adventure Crazy and Keoghan's Heroes (Keoghan rhymes with Hogan). "A recurring theme when people make their lists," he says, "is that they almost always put down things they've been afraid to try." Keoghan encourages everyone to make these a priority. "I can't tell you the number of times someone has done something they feared and then found themselves able to make other major life decisions," he says. It's corny, he admits, but it works. (For the record, Keoghan is claustrophobic, but he adds, "I've managed to push the fear back. It doesn't inhibit me." His therapy? Diving to one of the world's longest known underwater tunnels, Nohoch Nah Chich, under the Yucatán jungle.)
 
2. Don't panic. "When you're trying something you've never done before, most people find themselves really hyper about being in a situation that's out of control," says Joyce, who watched the show prior to appearing on it. "We learned not to get so excited about everything because there are going to be a lot of new things coming at you all the time."

3. Pack for one week. "Whether I'm going out for a week or several months, I only ever pack for a week," says Keoghan. "Because you don't want to be weighed down, and you can always wash up."
 
4. Have a plan before you clear customs. If you aren't sure where you're going, ask for information in the airport before you pass through security into the public waiting areas. And get the map.
 
5. Stick to backpacks, not messenger bags. "If you're going for anything longer than a weekend, make sure your bag has two shoulder straps," says Keoghan.
"I find the [single-strap] shoulder bags just bugger your back."
 
6. Avoid checking bags. Or, if you can't get yourself down to one carry-on, keep your total number of bags to an absolute minimum. The more items you have, the more you have to keep track of, and the more you stand to lose. "It's in the belly of the plane that things can start to go bad," van Munster warns.
 
7. Never share a taxi with a stranger (especially at the airport). In all his travels, van Munster has only been abducted once, in Calcutta, India, when, against his own better judgment, he got in a cab with a driver and "the owner" of the cab, who refused to surrender the backseat when asked. Turns out, "the owner" had told the driver that he was with van Munster's crew and moments later hijacked the ride. Fortunately, a journalist friend had been looking out the back of his taxi, which was ahead of van Munster's, and he noticed when the trailing cab disappeared. Van Munster was found by his team in a Calcutta slum two hours later, stripped to his briefs, but otherwise fine. (Corollary to #7: Don't have someone meet you at the airport with a sign bearing your name, van Munster says. You'll be a target for hustlers.)
 
8. There is no simple, over-the-counter solution for jet lag.
 
9. Never wear shorts. At least, not if you're male and not if you leave the grounds of a resort, the trail, or the beach. "I recommend lightweight long pants," says van Munster. "They're protection against mosquitoes, fleas, dog bites, snakebites.... Many people take malaria drugs, but I don't. I just keep covered, and I blend in, because in most places adult men wear long pants." Also, avoid matching outfits. This verily screams "tourist."
 
10. Schedules are subject to interpretation. Go with the flow. In Zermatt, Switzerland, your train will depart at exactly 8:42 a.m. as noted, but in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, an 8 a.m. bus might, or might not, leave anytime before dinner. Adjust your outlook accordingly.
 
11. If you must, panhandle from fellow travelers. "Being far from home, [other travelers] can commiserate," says Joyce, who, along with Uchenna, was stranded without a dollar in Montego Bay, Jamaica, as a consequence of losing a leg of the race. The departures terminal or lounge may be your best bet: "If they're coming in to the country," Uchenna says, "they'll have a little more money, but they're more apt to hold on because it's got to last their whole trip. If they're on their way home, chances are they'll be a bit looser with it because they know they're not going to need it as much."
 
12. Always act the guest. If you're respectful of your foreign hosts and try to see things through their eyes, you'll most likely find that you'll be treated hospitably. "People may not like our foreign policy, but people everywhere like Americans," says van Munster. "There really is something of an American spirit, and people are drawn to it. You've got to have confidence in that, and, above all, know that the world is really a very safe place."

Photograph by Phil Keoghan/CBS

Read more in the pages of Adventure magazine.
Title: Teachers on 'Amazing Race'
Post by: puddin on November 03, 2005, 09:21:33 PM
Teachers on 'Amazing Race'
Reggie and Kimberly Black recount their adventures on reality show.
By Gale Curcio/Gazette
November 3, 2005



 
When math teacher Reggie Black returned to West Potomac High School after his summer vacation, he had a lot to talk about. Unlike when he left in the spring and could only say that he had to take time off, he could now share a little more information about his family’s trip.
As one of the 10 families for this season’s Amazing Race series, they had a summer they will never forget. Although they were eliminated after the first round, they still spent an incredible summer sequestered while the remaining nine families continued their races.
This all came about when they decided to try out for this season’s Amazing Race earlier this year. Black said that they weren’t die-hard reality show buffs but wondered what it would be like to travel to different parts of the world.
"Kim and I don’t watch much TV, but the one show we watched was ‘Amazing Race.’ Once it won an Emmy, it caught our attention," said Reggie Black. "Our everyday schedule is like a race. We used to joke about it and then we decided to try out for the show."

AND SO THE JOURNEY began. They began the interviewing process along with 50,000 other families in late February/early March. Reggie Black said that the interview process was just as stressful as the race, with interviews being held in New York City, Las Vegas and other locations. They had to pull Kenneth and Austin out of school and Kimberly, a fifth-grade teacher at Douglas MacArthur Elementary School in Alexandria, had to take time off as well.
"I’ve been there for 12 years and never take time off," said Kimberly Black. "I couldn’t tell the principal, Debbie Thompson, where I was going, but I told her it was ‘something big.’ She was very supportive."
Kimberly Black said that the producers were great and treated them very well. All flights, meals and hotels were paid for throughout the process.
When asked if they got discouraged through the selection process, Reggie Black said, "As we kept getting closer, our drive for the races was stronger and stronger. And lo and behold we made it. Once we got the final word, we were very excited and said, ‘Let’s go for it.’"
They then started doing some serious preparation for the race. This coincided with the end of the school year, so during the day they still had to stay focused on school and work, but in the evenings., they focused on the race.

THE 10 TEAMS started out in New York City, crossed the Delaware River and ended up in Lancaster, Penn. They had the choice of building a house or pushing a buggy; the Blacks decided to build the house instead. When all was said and done they came in last.
"We had a good run; nothing to be ashamed of," said Reggie Black. "We didn’t get to the finish line but we worked together and are proud of how we handled ourselves. Don’t feel too bad for us; we were very well taken care of."
After they were eliminated they spent the rest of the summer sequestered and they knew what was going on as people connected with the race kept them up to date.
"It was pretty cultivating; there were no down moments — it was wonderful," said Reggie Black.
If there was a downside, it was the fact that they had to leave two-year-old Jordan behind. However, he was well taken care of by Tae Kwon Do families. Tae Kwon Do is something that the entire family participates in with all of the members having achieved a certain level.
Kimberly Black said, "If anybody has an opportunity to do it, do it. You just can’t let it control you. We learned how to be strong."
And so how does it feel that their more than 15 minutes of fame is over? Well, even though the Blacks were eliminated early they are still much in the public eye. Reggie said that the American public has embraced them with emails and letters. In September, they went to New York City for an interview with the CBS Morning Show.
After that they walked the streets of New York City, and Black said, "I was surprised that people knew who we were. They said nice things about our performance."

THIS IS REGGIE BLACK’S second year teaching math at WPHS. Prior to that, he taught math at C.D. Hylton High School in Prince William County for four years. He graduated from Norfolk State University with a degree in mathematics.
"He [Mr. Black] is an excellent teacher who can work well with all Algebra students, but especially those who normally have trouble with math," said Rima Vesilind, WPHS principal. "He makes it a personal mission to have each of his students pass the SOLs."
Kimberly Black is a fifth-grade teacher in Alexandria. She earned her master's in education from Marymount University.
Kenneth is in sixth grade and his favorite hobbies are soccer and Tae Kwon Do; he earned his black belt in Tae Kwon Do over two years ago.
Austin is in the fourth grade and at 8 years old, he is the youngest contestant ever to compete in the Amazing Race. He has an advanced brown belt in Tae Kwon Do and plans on earning his black belt within the next few months.
The Black family lives in Woodbridge. Reggie and Kimberly Black, who met in undergraduate school, have been married for over 17 years.

http://www.connectionnewspapers.com/article.asp?article=58416&paper=69&cat=104
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on November 07, 2005, 10:15:24 AM
An article on Rob & Amber (http://jam.canoe.ca/Television/2005/11/06/1295592.html) , not related to TARFamily but I didn'y know where else to stick it . :yaya:
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on November 08, 2005, 03:47:49 PM
A long article on the Schroeders here  The Amazing Race: Wanting Much More: The Schroeder Family Interview]  (http://www.realityreel.com/news-realitytv-article-1530.htm)

I haven't had time to read it all yet but from what little I read its pretty interesting  :yaya:
Good luck with the pop-ups at this site as well as the slow loading pages .


And, as for the enigmatic Weavers, who initially appeared heroically brave and deserving of our praise for persevering through a grisly loss, soon seem almost universally scorned. All the Schroeders, including Hunter, had harsh words for them. What gives? Who are these Weaver people?! "Every single family agreed..." says Stassi. "They were so rude to families especially during Pit Stops. You would ask them questions, they wouldn't answer; stare at us blank in the face; walk away. That was how they were. And then they would come up and try to be our friends, like, Hey! What's going on? and I was like, Are you kidding me? And then they would go up to other teams and say, 'You know what? I have a proposition for you, you know, I want to be allies with you.' This after they were so rude to them!

"I mean, when we came into the trailer park, they were screaming to the Godlewskis, 'Don't you dare help them! Don't help them! We hate them!' And then they came up to us right after, 'How was your day? Were you OK? How are you?' It's just extremely fake and hypocritical, and I'm all for playing the game — I think you should. So I'm for being aggressive in the Race. It's just that there's ways to go about things and they didn't play with integrity. And I can tell you that every chance they got they would break the rules. I'm not kidding. They would cut us off, we almost got into car accidents with them; when we were being yelled at for going, like, five miles over the speed limit... I mean, no one appreciated the way they were acting or playing the game."

"Initially I got along great with the girls, I was always talking with them, you know. And they were very nice to me. It was just like in the second leg something snapped and it's like the mom put a chain on each and every one of them and pulled them aside and said, 'Listen. This is what you have to do.' And it was like something just changed all of a sudden.

"And another thing, I mean, they complained 24/7 and cried about how they wanted to go home, they hated the Race, WHY were they doing this... when all of my family and I wanted to do was just continue... And for us to get out knowing that we wanted it so bad and have them [the Weavers] sit there and watch us be eliminated — and not even care — it was heartbreaking." Mark Schroeder concurs earnestly: "That's our problem with the Weavers. We had our whole heart and soul invested in this and we had to listen to them whining and crying and complaining about not wanting to be there... it made us insane."

"I have a ton of respect for the Weavers for getting through what they did," continues Stassi, almost subdued. "If I were in their situation, I don't know if I would have been able to go through that. And that's another reason I was so upset because I'm glad for them for being able to succeed and to get through what they did. And now they probably think we're just the devil! Honestly, it did look like we were really big assholes and if I were them I'd be extremely upset. And I wish I could just get a hold of them and get in touch with them, it's just... I wouldn't know what to say."
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on November 22, 2005, 10:37:22 AM
Linz kids running the good 'Race'

By John Kiesewetter
Enquirer staff writer

 
It's not that her kids have made it to the final four of "The Amazing Race," but how they've done it that makes Terri Linz proud.

"The kindness they've showed to each other - and others - has been nice," says the Anderson Township resident about Nick, 24, Alex, 23, Megan, 21 and Tommy (aka "Bone"), 19.

So far, six of the 10 families have been eliminated in CBS' Emmy-winning competition for a $1 million prize that will be awarded sometime next month.

And it hasn't been pretty. The "family edition" - with teams expanded from couples to four people - will be remembered as the most mean-spirited of the eight editions.

Even the Linz kids have been surprised at the snarky comments made about teams by the Weavers - widow Linda, 46, and her three teenage children from Ormond Beach, Fla.

"My children said they never thought ill of the Weavers until they watched the shows on TV," says Linz, the official family spokesperson. The four participants can't talk to the media until they are eliminated from (or win) the race.

"Alex told me they had no problem with them at all, but they never really got to know them.," she says.

The negative tone may be hurting CBS ratings. The "Race" has run fourth at 9 p.m. Tuesdays this fall in TV's most competitive time period, where four shows rank among the top 30. ABC's new "Commander in Chief" is 10th with 15.8 million viewers, followed by "My Name Is Earl" (No. 19; 12.6 million); "House" (No. 20; 12.8 million) and the "Race" (No. 30; 12.5 million). The "Race" has lost 500,000 viewers since last spring.

Linz says she's pleased at how CBS has portrayed her children: As fun-loving kids, proudly wearing Cincinnati Bengals "Who Dey" shirts.

The mother of seven says her kids laugh at reports that betting on the show was suspended by www.Sportsbook.com because of all the bets from Ohio on the Linzes to win.

"All of Cincinnati is going to root for the hometown team, and common sense will tell you they'd be betting on the hometown team," she says.

E-mail jkiesewetter@enquirer.com.

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051122/ENT/511220312
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: supsandalee on November 28, 2005, 07:52:10 PM
The mother of seven says her kids laugh at reports that betting on the show was suspended by www.Sportsbook.com because of all the bets from Ohio on the Linzes to win.

"All of Cincinnati is going to root for the hometown team, and common sense will tell you they'd be betting on the hometown team," she says.

What is this??? A feable attempt at a coverup? Why even bring it up? I'm curious about this statement.
Then again the mother also says this which cannot possibly be true:

Quote
"My children said they never thought ill of the Weavers until they watched the shows on TV"
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on November 28, 2005, 08:00:20 PM
 :lolCX: I guess Mom doesn't watch the same show we are watching ??

Follow the money ..honest Sups as you know how many times have we seen a bad betting spoiler ?
Last season I bet against Ucheena & Joyce cause after studying the vid-caps I concluded that there was no way U&J could possably catch up to Rombers lead ..well we all know what happened there .. ]][
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: supsandalee on November 28, 2005, 08:08:05 PM
When U&J were at the Puerto Rico airport and those doors were closed I suppose there was alot of "CODE RED, CODE RED" being heard on the crews walkie talkies.  :lolCX:
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on November 28, 2005, 08:31:23 PM
 :lolCX: although I love U&J and would not begrudge them the win and TAR 7 was my Fav season ,the last episode still leaves a bad taste in my mouth  ]*]
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: supsandalee on November 28, 2005, 08:44:02 PM
I know what you mean but I have a feeling that they would have worked to get those doors open regardless of the team. As creative as they are at editing, they wouldn't have been able to swing only one team being in the final city for the big finale!
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: Chateau d If on November 28, 2005, 09:10:21 PM
And I haven't had the team I wanted to win since season 3.

Sorry Sups!

You know, this team: 
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: supsandalee on November 28, 2005, 09:30:47 PM
What did I ever do to you? Are you just trying to torture me?????  )!)
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: Chateau d If on November 28, 2005, 09:45:04 PM
To be honest, it was really Zach that made me root for them.

And then I took this picture and concluded she's okay.

The other half of it has Kim in it.  Do you want to see it?
Title: Ormond family races for 'Amazing' finale
Post by: puddin on December 06, 2005, 06:13:51 PM
Ormond family races for 'Amazing' finale

From Staff Reports
Posted December 6, 2005, 4:21 PM EST

 
 
America will find out tonight if the Ormond Beach family on the CBS reality show "The Amazing Race" will be among the final three families who will compete for the $1 million prize.

Linda Weaver, 46, and her three children, 19-year-old Rebecca, 16-year-old Rachel and 14-year-old Rolly, are vying in the travel adventure quest for $1 million.

The father of the family, Roy Weaver III, was struck and killed by a race car at Daytona International Speedway Feb. 8, 2004, as he was removing debris from the track. The family has a wrongful-death lawsuit pending against the track and the race-car driver involved.

Then came the opportunity to join the TV show, which features teams that must race around the globe and complete tasks at different locations. This season's version of the show has spent most of its time in the United States, but has ventured to both Panama and Costa Rica as well.

The race began with 11 families of four (  |( ), but has been whittled down to the last four. The final three teams will compete for the final prize. Those final three will be decided in tonight's one-hour episode which airs on WKMG at 9 p.m.

The Weavers have come in first in just one of the previous nine pit stops. They are currently in second place after the last leg brought them to watch Old Faithful at Yellowstone National Park.

"One of the reasons why we want to do the race is just to really work together as a team, and accomplish a goal and find out we're still a family -- we're still a victorious family," Linda Weaver said.

"We were a strong, united family before," she said. "Now we're going to be a strong, united family again."

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/entertainment/tv/orl-bk-amazingfamily120605,0,1158040.story?coll=orl-home-headlines
Title: Amazing, or just a maze?
Post by: puddin on December 12, 2005, 12:43:17 AM
Amazing, or just a maze?

01:00 AM EST on Monday, December 12, 2005
BY ANDY SMITH
Journal Television Writer
 


It seemed like an intriguing idea for The Amazing Race, CBS's Emmy-winning reality show, which has its two-hour season finale tomorrow night at 9 p.m. (Ch. 4 and 12).

Instead of couples racing around the world for a $1 million first prize, the current edition of the show features four-person families -- some with children as young as 8. (Among the families racing this season was the Aiello clan of Mansfield, Mass., which includes Johnston police officer David Alverson.)

But critics, and many fans, have widely panned Amazing Race: Family Edition. Somehow, the dynamics between couples were far more interesting than the relationships among four family members.

"Personally, I can't wait until The Amazing Race gets back to the business of showcasing pairs," wrote Marc Berman, of the broadcasting trade journal Mediaweek.

The racers rarely ventured outside the United States this season. For viewers who liked seeing Americans tiptoeing through rat-infested temples in India, this Amazing Race seemed less amazing than tame.

Bertrand van Munster, co-creator and executive producer for the show, is well aware of the criticism.

"Part of the problem we had as producers was that we had to introduce four people to the audience instead of two -- times 10," he said in a phone interview last week. "That's 40 people, and that's a difficult thing for the audience to absorb."

But Munster said the show didn't suffer in the ratings. (Last week about 11 million people watched the show.)

"I'm grateful that CBS was willing to try something different. . . . this was a very family-friendly show. And the show was a great calling card for the U.S. We had always wanted to do an 'Americana' version of the race, for us to show the beauty and diversity of the U.S. We become jaded in a way," said van Munster, who was born in Holland.

Van Munster didn't want to give much away about the next season of The Amazing Race, which is already in production. But he did say that it would go back to the original couples format -- and he promised audiences would not be bored.

"You'll all be sitting on the edge of your seat -- I guarantee it," he said.

When it first appeared, it took some time for The Amazing Race to find its audience. Its premiere aired right after the terrorist attacks of 9/11.

"Suddenly, no one was interested in seeing Americans on airplanes traveling around the world," van Munster said. "I thought it was all over. But CBS was very patient."

Slowly, Race's combination of far-flung adventure and personal conflicts caught on, and its production values won the admiration of the industry. (The Amazing Race has won the Emmy for best reality show three times).

Van Munster said there are some obvious security concerns when you're producing an international race, but by and large the world is not as dangerous as some might think.

"Everybody in this country is brainwashed about how bad the world is," he said. "We've been to 80 countries. Yeah, we're not flying to Afghanistan or Iraq, but almost everywhere we go we're treated with kindness and respect and hospitality."

Van Munster said the show continues to surprise him -- nobody can predict who will win.

In a bit of stunt casting last year, The Amazing Race recruited Survivor winners Rob Mariano and Amber Brkich.

With a mix of charm and amoral cunning, the pair almost won -- but got caught when competitors Uchenna and Joyce Agu persuaded a nearly departed plane to open its doors and let them on the flight.

That raised some eyebrows. But van Munster said The Amazing Race crew had nothing to do with it. "The whole idea is that they are inventive people, and they're able to persuade people to do things for them."

The previous season saw probably the show's most notorious contestant, Jonathan Baker, who appeared nasty to the point of abuse with his wife, Victoria Fuller.

Baker, who has grandparents in Rhode Island, said in interviews that the show's editing made him look worse than he really was.

"Jonathan's not a bad guy, don't get me wrong," van Munster said. "But I could have gone into the editing room and replaced everything we used with something else he did that we didn't use. It is what it is."

The television pendulum appears to have swung away from reality shows at the moment, with the hot shows scripted programs such as Desperate Housewives and Lost.

"Everything is cyclical," van Munster said. "There was a bit of a gold rush there for a while. Everybody thought they were a reality producer, and they could make a quick buck. The best [reality] shows will still survive."


http://www.projo.com/tv/content/projo_20051212_12amaze.839681c.html
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on December 12, 2005, 03:47:37 PM
Recently, Buzz had the pleasure of meeting Bill Gaghan who, with his wife and two children, completed six legs before being eliminated


What made you decide to enter the Race?

My wife has wanted to enter this kind of reality show for the longest time, and had been applying with her friends, her father, probably about four different times. She has always wanted to do it with me but thought that if we got picked, who’d watch the kids while we’re gone on the race? So, when this family format came up, we thought it was a great way to spend time as a family.

For us, joining the race was more for the adventure, the challenge and the competition of the race. I mean, to be able to travel and see interesting things that we normally wouldn’t able to see or experience in a very short time. It was no vacation – it was a race – but we went into it making sure we enjoyed and appreciated things as much as we could along the way.

How was it different being the only family with little children in the team, besides the Black family?

Every team has strengths and weaknesses. Looking at our team, it’s pretty obvious that having little kids made some tasks a lot tougher. But, Tammy and I travel a lot, and so one of our strengths was our travel experience. Another was the energy level – the kids were probably more pumped up than their parents! Plus, the fact that we had a defined leader, we could make decisions very quickly. Some of the other teams, like the Linz family (three brothers and a sister) didn’t have a defined leader and they spent a lot of their time fighting. At the very beginning, they almost got eliminated because of that but to their credit, they recovered and ever since that, they’ve really run a very strong race. It was very tough for us to compete against them, but we thought we had a good chance anyway.

What was the toughest thing you and your family had to do in the race?

The physically toughest thing that we had to do was when we pushed the Amish buggy for a mile-and-a-half. For me, I’ve run 11 marathons. Having run for thousands and thousands of miles, pushing that buggy was the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life. And there was only Tammy and I who pushed that darn thing. Although we had only little kids in there, and it’s a lighter weight for us, but the other teams had four adults who could switch turns and take a rest inside. That was a nightmare, but it felt good to be the first team to finish that challenge in the end.

Emotionally, the toughest part was at the end, looking at Phil in the eye and knowing it was coming. Plus, watching the show later, I saw Clarissa’s reaction when Phil told her we were eliminated. She kind of shrugged her shoulders and tried so hard to be a good soldier – that was really heart-breaking for me. Billy was consoling her, which was a nice big brother act, and I was proud of my family at that point, to see how we bonded together in a stressful condition. That was emotionally hard for me.

You were seen giving high fives to the Paolos when they chose to Yield team Florida (Weavers). We know that Ron and Amber were the ruthless duo in the previous Amazing Race. This time, it seems the Weavers are taking over as the most disliked team. But what made most of the teams in the Family Edition, and you especially, dislike the Weavers?

In the very beginning, you can’t talk to the other teams but when you started racing, you started talking to the people, developing relationships. From that first night when we were kind of getting together and bonded with each other, the Weavers clearly separated themselves from the rest of the pack. When I was on the race I kept a little journal and typed it all up in the computer. Just recently I was reading through things just to refresh my memory and one of the things I wrote was the second night when we were staying in Virginia; it was an extended pit stop so we were there for a day-and-a-half. All the other families were down at a common area where we were staying and we were all talking to each other, laughing and getting to know each other, but the Weavers had spent that first night the whole time locked up in their room all by themselves. So they wanted to be alone, so that’s okay, but later don’t come back and say “all the other teams hate us, they don’t like us.” I mean, you can’t have it both ways; it’s either you want to be alone or be part of the group. Even to this day, we send emails and telephone each other and form a very tight bond. Unfortunately, the Weavers aren’t part of that bond because that’s the way they chose to be.

If you could blame somebody for your elimination, who would it be? Do you think your wife’s bad luck in finding the red bean task caused your elimination?

Not the kids, definitely. There was nothing that our kids did that we can blame them. The decisions that got us eliminated were entirely Tammy and mine. It wasn’t really the red bean either. Tammy found the bean three to four minutes after the Weavers. For us it was the navigation from the red bead to the surf shop that killed us. For one, we didn’t have a map, so we were trying to figure out where we were going and we didn’t do it fast enough.

How did your family, especially your children take the loss?

We were sad, but not because we didn’t win. We kept on coming in second to last for awhile, and I didn’t want them to get depressed or demotivated so I said that all we had to do to stay alive in this was to pass one team. For us at that point, the team ahead of us was maybe two, five or eight minutes ahead of us, it was within reason to believe that we could pass them. So that’s how I kept it realistic for the children and kept them motivated. Like for Clarissa, she plays soccer for our town and she’s a really super competitive little girl. She goes out giving a hundred and ten per cent all the time and really likes to win. And Billy’s also a tough competitor who plays football. Despite that, we know that apart from winning, losing was also an option. We were sad, but merely because the adventure had come to the end for us.

Why was little Carissa crying at the end?

It was really because the adventure is over, she really wanted to keep on going and compete. Once it was over, when the camera was off, Phil came over and gave her a nice big hug. Phil has a nine year-old daughter as well, so I think he had like a special bond with Clarissa. All of the production people said very nice things to her and the family and wished us good luck. In the very beginning, it probably took two to three days for us to start switching gears from the race mode to trying to get ourselves back to normal life a little bit.

Now that the race has ended for you, who are you rooting for?

We are friends with the other teams in the race. The Bransen family is really nice and they are running a strong race. The Linz family is really nice as well, so it’s either the two of them.

http://www.mmail.com.my/Current_News/MM/Monday/Entertainment/20051212102726/Article/index_html
Title: Isn't it Amazing?
Post by: puddin on December 12, 2005, 06:48:57 PM
Isn't it Amazing?
The Linzes and a lot of other people think they can win the million- dollar race. Tuesday night, we'll find out.

By John Kiesewetter
Enquirer staff writer

 
 
 
The Linz kids of Anderson Township -Nick (left), Tommy, Alex and Megan- compete against two other families in the finale of "The Amazing Race."
 
 
ON THE AIR
What: "The Amazing Race: Family Edition" finale


Online: Families finishing second and third competed for a SUV. The event will be posted at www.CBS.com at 2 a.m. Wednesday after the broadcast.
 

AMAZING RACERS
Nick Linz, 24. A 1999 St. Xavier graduate and Miami University graduate. Works in Buffalo for Packstar, his father's packing company.

Alex Linz, 23. A 2000 St. X graduate and University of Cincinnati graduate. Employed as an emergency room technician at Anderson Mercy Hospital.

Megan Linz, 21. A Miami University junior and 2003 St. Ursula Academy graduate.

Tommy (aka "Bone") Linz, 19. A Miami University sophomore and 2004 St. X graduate. Nicknamed "Bone" as young child because of his bald head.

The Bransen family: Walter, 51, and daughters Elizabeth, 25, Lauren, 22, and Lindsay, 20, from Park Ridge, Ill.

The Weaver family: Widow Linda, 46, and children Rebecca, 19, Rachel, 16, and Rolly, 14, from Ormond Beach, Fla.
 
 
Tuesday night, we'll find out if Megan, 21, and her brothers - St. Xavier High School graduates Nick, 24; Alex, 23; and Tommy (aka "Bone"), 19 - are Anderson Township's newest millionaires.

Their "Team Who-Dey" is one of three families competing in the two-hour season finale.

"We're on a mission to win $1 million," Tommy told viewers last week.

Who dey think gonna beat them Linzes?

Nobody, according to www.Sportsbook.com. It suspended wagering on "The Amazing Race" before the September premiere due to the large number of bets placed on the Linzes.

Terri Linz, their mother, says her kids haven't told her a thing about the finale - or any episode - since coming home from the July taping.

Ten families began the race in New York City, and traveled across the United States to Central America, and back to the far West.

When the Linzes were knocked from first to last place by a dead car battery in an episode in Utah two weeks ago, Mom frantically called Nick at his home in Buffalo. He gave her the answer she has heard for weeks from her kids: "Just watch the show."

"I know people look at me strange when I say it, but I don't know what's going to happen," says Terri, 52, a part-time nurse at Mercy Hospital Clermont.

Terri and her husband, Tom, have watched the weekly exploits here with more than 150 family members or friends. The kids have flown an airplane, piloted a hot-air balloon, ridden an astronaut's centrifugal force machine, and assembled railroad tracks and a covered wagon.

"My kids have done more things and seen more places than I ever thought," their mom says. "Nick says he's made notes, and wants to visit every place he's seen."

During a September visit here, host Phil Keoghan praised the Linzes' strength, positive attitude and willingness to try new things. While the Linzes laughed their way through adversity, other teams argued and imploded.

"I love the Linzes. They're naïve in a good way, meaning they're receptive to change," Keoghan said.

"One of the best things going for them is they have a sense of humor. It will get you through anything. A sense of humor is absolutely imperative if you're going to travel these days."

All the Linzes - Mom, Dad, their seven children and only daughter-in-law - are flying to New York for CBS' finale party Tuesday. Everyone is going because they were all on a Christmas vacation last year in the Cancun airport when a casting director asked if they would consider auditioning for a reality show.

Now they are reality TV stars. Internet chat boards have been buzzing about the Linzes, which likely will translate into national celebrity even if they don't win the cash.

"I love All-American, Midwest prime beef and these boys totally fit the bill," wrote one fan on Televisionwithoutpity.com.

Since August, CBS has banned the Linzes from making any public appearances. They've turned down requests to be honored by the Bengals at a halftime ceremony (though they signed autographs when recognized at the Bengals-Ravens game). Nick and Alex, former St. Xavier football players, couldn't participate in the Bombers pep rally before the state championship two weeks ago.

It all changes Tuesday night.

"We'll just see what happens," their mom says. "I'm not prepared at all, and neither do I think they are. Given opportunities, they're not stupid."

Including doing more TV?

"I could see any of them doing it," she says. "They're not shy!"

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051212/LIFE/512120310/1086
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on December 13, 2005, 10:41:38 AM
Amazing race sputters to finish line 

Published: Tuesday, December 13, 2005
This season's underwhelming Family Edition of The Amazing Race concludes tonight, when three teams are expected to race through Canada on their way to a finish line in Niagara Falls, New York: there's the annoying Weaver family, the spunky Linz siblings and the blond Bransen sisters and their dad Wally.

The producers tried to freshen up the format by having families of four instead of teams of two. But because young children were involved, travel was contained to North and Central America, thereby eliminating two appealing components of the round-the-world version: (a) spectacular footage of foreign cultures, and (b) Americans struggling spectacularly to adapt to foreign cultures. Remember model Kendra, the eventual winner of Amazing Race 6, complaining that families in Africa "just keep breeding"?

An unintentionally ludicrous corollary of the new format was that the only black family on the show was actually named "the Black family." Mainstream reality television shows are always suspiciously low on visible minorities; this image was only compounded when host Phil Keoghan stared dramatically into the eyes of the losing candidates on the first episode and said, "Black family, I'm sorry to tell you you've all been eliminated from the race." It was like a skit from Dave Chappelle's show.

Tonight (9 p.m., CTV and CBS) the teams arrive in Toronto, where one of the Linz brothers (I can't tell them apart, nor the Bransen sisters, for that matter) collides with Rolly Weaver in a race for the Terminal One ticket counter. This will be yet another in a series of injustices committed against the Weavers, who have the biggest persecution complex since Conrad Black. They play the game as fiercely as anyone else, but when another team, usually the Linzes, tries to gain an advantage on them, it's because they hate them for loving God.

Someone must be listening to the prayers the Weavers have offered throughout the race, though, because no one else is on their side -- certainly not the producers, who have demonstrated a cruel sense of humour about the Weaver kids having lost their father in a racetrack accident. Hey, wouldn't it make great television to have the family drive to a speedway, where they are assigned a vaguely worded task involving "speeding" around? After many tears were shed over the prospect of using a racecar, the Weavers were finally shown the four-person bicycle they were to use for the task.

And yet, in spite of all that, it's impossible to root for them. I think they lost me in the very first episode, after a truck driver offered directions and Ma Weaver ran off shouting over her shoulder, "We'll be spending eternity together!"

The Bransens, meanwhile, are an appealing combination of three athletic sisters and a dad that would be your next-door neighbour in Anytown, U.S.A., equal parts goofy hair, dopey grin, short temper and beer belly. Each leg has included at least one "Hurry up, dad!" scene. Tonight the Bransens apparently find themselves looking for something at Olympic Stadium in Montreal. There are so many empty yellow seats around them, they must have been at an Expos game.

Finally, there are the Weavers' arch-rivals the Linzes, consisting of three brothers who spend their weekends at Home Depot, plus their beleaguered sister. The Linzes barely beat that Black family to survive the first episode, but since then, have finished third or higher every week but one. It's tough to bet against them in any task involving strength, but if God answers the Weavers' prayers and smites them, it could be an amazing finish.

http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/story.html?id=3678e0c8-b458-49be-9762-2be112ee541e&k=21156
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on December 13, 2005, 10:43:03 AM
Amazing Race can't finish fast enough
By STEVE TILLEY, TORONTO SUN

     
 

Next time, leave the kids at home.

On paper, a version of The Amazing Race featuring families of four tearing around the globe sounded perfect. Imagine the agony of driving cross-country with squealing offspring crammed in the back of the station wagon, and multiply the time, distance and drama by a factor of 100.

But The Amazing Race: Family Edition, which reaches the finish line in tonight's two-hour season finale (9 p.m. on CTV and CBS), couldn't deliver on its promise.

WHINING

With the exception of Florida's God-lovin' Weaver clan, made up of widowed mom Linda and kids aged 14 to 19, all the families with younger children were culled from the herd relatively early. To be fair, though, the adults have held up their end of the bickering, whining and fit-throwing nicely.
 

And the show's tradition of taking contestants to far-flung lands was severely clipped by the presence of kids. So instead, we were treated to what amounted to a travelogue of the United States, with only the briefest sojourns to Panama, Costa Rica and Canada.

Still in the running for the $1-million US prize are the Weavers, the Linz family (three brothers and one long-suffering sister) and the Bransen family (dad and three twentysomething daughters.)

Frankly, tonight's ending won't be a moment too soon. Why? Well, there was the aforementioned lack of country-hopping and the large number of players didn't help either.

CBS has confirmed the next season of The Amazing Race, already filmed and due to air early next year, will revert back to traditional teams of two. So at least there's that.

http://www.ottawasun.com/Showbiz/Television/2005/12/13/1350385-sun.html
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on December 13, 2005, 10:46:22 AM
Tonight will tell if Linz siblings win 'Race'

By Rick Bird
Post staff reporter

 
 

 
The Linz siblings -- Megan, Alex, Nick and Tommy. Channel 12's viewership for "The Amazing Race" has been more than double the national average.
 
 

 
Well, at least they haven't embarrassed mom.

Terri Linz, a part-time nurse from Anderson Township, whose four kids are in the running to be the first tri-state contestants to hit a reality show jackpot, said there have been only a few moments in CBS's "The Amazing Race: Family Edition" that required her to cringe.

"Outside of some choice words and passing flatulence - as the nurse mom would say - no, they've been good," Terri said. "All in all I've gotten nothing but great comments. And that's what's been so cool from friends. Even random people have just called and said it's so much fun watching your family and how heart warming they are. That's music to my ears."

Going into tonight's two-hour finale, at 9 p.m. on WKRC-TV (Channel 12), the three bothers and sister team are easily the most athletic and robust of the three remaining teams. The other finalist families are Linda Weaver, a Florida widow and her three children, and Walter Bransen from Illinois with his three daughters.

The four Linzes are the middle four of seven kids raised by Terri and her husband, Tom, a partner in a packaging company. The Linz team:

Nick, 24, a sales rep for his dad's company based in Buffalo, N.Y.

Alex, 23, an emergency room technician now living at home awaiting medical school applications.

Megan, 21, a junior at Miami University.

Tommy (aka "Bone"), 19, a sophomore at Miami.

The four have come across as a fun-loving bunch - yes, flashing some college-age, bathroom humor and a prankster attitude toward other players. They have done the challenges - including rappelling, building wagon wheels, bailing out boats, assembling railroad tracks, piloted a stunt plane and a hot air balloon - with an infectious good humor.

"My children, by nature, take life in a very good-humored way. They went into this knowing they would have fun, regardless. And it has been a ride of a lifetime," Terri said.

While careful to praise all his teams, the show's executive producer and co-creator, Bertram van Munster, who is personally involved with the casting, also seemed high on the Linzes in an interview last Friday.

"They had a fantastic dynamic, a really terrific group of people," said van Munster. "Most of them had a good sports background, so they had a good sense of fairness. They have a real solid all-American background."

"Amazing Race" producers took a chance this season by messing with the formula of the series, which has won three Emmys in a row for best reality show. The game has always featured up to 16 teams with two people each. This season, all 10 teams comprised four members who were related somehow to each other. Further, the race was mostly in the United States, unlike the usual around-the-world sprint.

Van Munster acknowledged ratings were down at first this season. "It is not easy to tell the story of 40 people, but as we went on, our ratings kept going up. I have gotten a lot of compliments."

However, van Munster said he has no plans for another family edition. The next "Race" will be back to the duo teams, but CBS has not made a decision yet when it will air.

"The Amazing Race" has almost quietly become one of America's most famous pop culture exports. Even the current edition is seen in dozens of countries and van Munster says it has become an international phenomenon that defines the country as much as Condoleezza Rice's globetrotting.

"The show is a fantastic business card for the United States of America," he said. "This is a beautiful country, and we get nothing but criticism from all the other stuff."

Van Munster says when "Amazing Race" crews show up to film in other countries, the show is almost instantly recognized and warmly greeted no matter how remote the locale.

The show is a logistical nightmare to produce with a crew of 2,000 almost constantly on the move. When suggested to van Munster that fans would probably watch a behind-the-scenes documentary on the making of "Race," he said, "Call CBS."

"In this business, and particularly CBS, they would never do it," he said. "I don't think they want to show how we do this stuff. They are opposed to 'making-ofs.' "

As for tonight's outcome, Terri Linz insists her kids have kept it a secret, which at times prompted her to call her kids midway through episodes asking, "C'mon I can't stand it."

"Repeatedly, their classic line is, 'Mom watch the show.' I can't believe these kids are doing this to me. Over and over. We are a pretty close-knit family and sometimes a mom can read between the lines. This time they are keeping it really secret."

There was a suggestion somebody may have leaked something last September when an Internet betting site halted wagering on the series because of an unusual number of bets coming from Ohio. Both Terri and the show's producer shrug off the controversy.

"We just had to laugh," Terri said. "My husband said he wouldn't bet on his kids so why would anyone else."

"We have investigated it and it's come to an end," van Munster said without offering any details.

He said he often dispatches decoy camera crews and uses other tricks to help diffuse and even spread rumors during a filming of the series to muddy the waters for "Race" pundits.

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051213/LIFE/512130303/1005
Title: Family promises that they’ll win ‘Amazing Race’ in tonight’s finale
Post by: puddin on December 13, 2005, 04:46:26 PM
Family promises that they’ll win ‘Amazing Race’ in tonight’s finale
By The Cincinnati Enquirer         

Like Cincinnati Bengals receiver Chad Johnson, Megan Linz is promising victory — the $1 million prize on “The Amazing Race: Family Edition.”

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Click comment to go to story“It’s ours, unless someone takes it from us — and that’s not going to happen,” the Cincinnati resident told the national TV audience as last week’s show ended.


Tonight, we’ll find out if Megan, and her brothers — Nick, Alex, and Tommy (aka “Bone”) — are America’s newest millionaires.

Their “Team Who-Dey” in Bengals’ orange shirts is one of three families competing in the two-hour season finale (8-10 p.m., CBS). In a new twist, the families finishing second and third will compete for a new GMC Yukon XL in a challenge available only at www.CBS.com after 1 a.m. Wednesday.

“We’re on a mission to win $1 million,” Tommy told viewers on last week’s show.

And they might. The online betting service, www.Sportsbook.com, suspended wagering on “The Amazing Race” before the September premiere, because of a large number of bets being placed on the Linzes from Ohio. The same thing happened in March, with heavy betting on a Houston couple that won “The Amazing Race” two months later.

Terri Linz, their mother, says her kids haven’t told her a thing about the finale — or any episode — since coming home from the July taping. Ten families began the race in New York City and traveled across the U.S. to Central America and back to the far West.

When the Linzes were knocked from first to last place by a dead car battery in an Utah episode two weeks ago, mom frantically called Nick at his home in Buffalo. He gave her the answer she has heard for weeks from her kids: “Just watch the show.”

“I know people look at me strange when I say it, but I don’t know what’s going to happen,” says Terri, 52, a part-time nurse. “But that’s the way it should be. It makes it more fun for everyone that way.”

Terri and her husband, Tom, have watched the weekly exploits at a downtown Cincinnati restaurant with more than 150 family members or friends. The kids have flown an airplane, piloted a hot-air balloon, ridden an astronaut’s centrifugal force machine, and assembled railroad tracks and a covered wagon.

“My kids have done more things and seen more places than I ever thought,” their mom says. “Nick says he’s made notes and wants to visit every place he’s seen.”

During a September visit to Cincinnati, host Phil Keoghan praised the Linzes’ strength, positive attitude and willingness to try new things. While the Linzes laughed their way through adversity, other teams argued and imploded.

“I love the Linzes. They’re naive in a good way, meaning they’re receptive to change,” he said.

“One of the best things going for them is they have a sense of humor. It will get you through anything. A sense of humor is absolutely imperative if you’re going to travel these days,” Keoghan said.

All the Linzes — mom, dad, their seven children and only daughter-in-law — are flying to New York for CBS’ finale party. Everyone is going because they were all on a Christmas vacation last year in the Cancun airport when a casting director asked if they would consider auditioning for a reality show.

Now they’re reality TV stars. Internet chat boards have been buzzing about the Linzes, which likely will translate into national celebrity. Even if they don’t win the cash.

“I love All-American, Midwest prime beef and these boys totally fit the bill,” wrote one fan on the Television Without Pity (www.Televisionwithoutpity.com) Web site. Wrote another: “I really like the Linzes, especially Megan who seems really cool and is pretty to boot.”

Since August, CBS has banned the Linzes from making any public appearances. They’ve turned down requests to be honored by the Bengals at a half-time ceremony (though they signed autographs when recognized at the Bengals-Ravens game).

It all changes Tuesday night.

“We’ll just see what happens,” their mom says. “I’m not prepared at all, and neither do I think they are. Given opportunities, they’re not stupid.”

Including doing more TV?

“I could see any of them doing it,” she says. “They’re not shy.”

http://www.qctimes.net/articles/2005/12/13/features/arts_leisure/doc439e6b1539bbd443827478.txt
Title: Re: Family promises that they’ll win ‘Amazing Race’ in tonight’s finale
Post by: puddin on December 13, 2005, 05:35:11 PM
Buffalo salesman's mother is the only one talking about 'Amazing Race' finish

12/13/2005 
 
  By ALAN PERGAMENT

I just love the media rules of reality TV. I can't talk to the Buffalo salesman, Nick Linz, whose Cincinnati family is among the three finalists in the two-hour finale of CBS' "Amazing Race" (9 tonight, Channel 4).
He's being silenced until Wednesday morning after the $1 million check is presented on the American side of Niagara Falls in tonight's finale.

But CBS did allow me to talk with Nick's mom, Terri.

It's a good thing, too. I expected a ton of e-mails from Nick's co-workers as "Amazing" went on, but they never materialized. All I knew about him came from a Cincinnati newspaper story that said he "was the bruising fullback on the 1998 runner-up high school team in Ohio, St. Xavier."

After talking to Nick's mom, I understand why my e-mail box wasn't overloaded. Mrs. Linz said Nick works for two companies in Amherst that specialize in packaging and shrink labeling, Tri Pack Sleevers and Packstar. They are co-owned by Nick's father, Tom, who lives in Cincinnati, and has two partners, Andy Sharp and Helen Ma, in Buffalo.

Mrs. Linz added that the multimillion dollar companies are expanding, and Nick will soon be moving to the West Coast. That suggests the family doesn't need the prize money.

Wrong.

"Of course, he does, everybody could," said Mrs. Linz, noting Nick is one of seven children. "They all have college loans."

The Linz family was approached by a representative of "Amazing Race" while they were on a family vacation in Cancun.

"We were all sitting around and someone said, "You look like a nice family' and asked if they wanted to do it," said Mrs. Linz. Nick, 24, Alex, 22, Megan, 21 and Tommy, 19, eventually went online along with thousands of others and applied.

"They did it right at the deadline," said Mrs. Linz. "That's typical of my family - procrastination."

Oh, mom.

They were chosen to appear and immediately took the colors (orange and black) and cheer of the Cincinnati Bengals and dubbed themselves the Who Dey Team.

"It's "Who dey think is going to beat those Bengals,' " said Mrs. Linz, explaining the cheer.

So far, the Linz family is having as good a year as the Bengals.

To be honest, I haven't watched much of the eighth edition of the Emmy-winning series. The buzz on this edition was worse than the buzz on the marriage between another Cincinnati native, Nick Lachey, and Jessica Simpson. It's been called, uh, dull.

"Not by everyone," said Mrs. Linz. She is proud of the weekly cheers she gets from friends and viewers who tell her how much they have enjoyed watching such a nice family.

"I find myself a little humbled," she said. "They all say how wonderful it is that they are kind to each other and are having fun together. They consider it a lifetime experience."

After watching last Tuesday's semifinal, I understand some of the criticism. The final four may have been the least diverse group on any TV show since the early years of "Friends."

It consisted of four white families. The Linz Family is composed of Nick, his two brothers and their only sister. The Bransens (dad and three daughters), the Weavers (a widowed mother and her children) and the Godlewskis (four sisters) rounded out the final four.

They built teepees or put four wheels on a covered wagon they took for a short ride, had their pictures taken at a saloon named after Buffalo Bill's daughter (Irma) and looked for colored golf balls on a course.

The Linz family led for most of the hour, but blew first place when they forgot to look for a fourth golf ball in the most likely place - the hole. That was so Buffalo.

Not that the Linz family talked much about Buffalo. The Queen City they mentioned was in Ohio. That's natural since they are from Cincinnati, which also calls itself the Queen City.

The Godlewskis were way behind for most of the hour, though there was some brief suspense when the Weavers were stopped for speeding. They ended up with a warning and earned third place.

The most interesting aspect of the semifinal for Western New Yorkers probably came during the promos for tonight's episode, which revealed they take a jet boat ride in the Niagara River, and there is a curling competition.

The episode was filmed locally on July 31, with the show sending some "Amazing" fanatics off on a wild goose chase to Toronto and Boston so the secret of who won was retained.

Since Nick lives here, you might think he had some sort of home advantage in the final leg that might help his family win.

But let's face it. If his family loses after coming so close to winning, it would make him seem more like a real Buffalonian.


http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20051213/1006021.asp
Title: Re: Family promises that they’ll win ‘Amazing Race’ in tonight’s finale
Post by: puddin on December 13, 2005, 05:35:53 PM
Families lack buzz

Tue, December 13, 2005

The Amazing Race lost its edge with too many participants, a lack of exotic travel locations and the early loss of some of those love-to-hate-'em contestants.

By STEVE TILLEY, SPECIAL TO THE FREE PRESS
   

 
Next time, leave the kids at home.

On paper, a version of The Amazing Race featuring families of four tearing around the globe sounded perfect: Imagine the agony of driving cross-country with squealing offspring crammed in the back of the station wagon and multiply the time and distance by the drama of competition. With every last temper tantrum caught on tape.

Except The Amazing Race: Family Edition, which reaches the finish line in tonight's two-hour season finale, didn't deliver on its promise. Or at least its premise.

With the exception of Florida's God-lovin' Weaver clan, made up of widowed mom Linda and kids aged 14 to 19, all the families with younger children were culled from the herd relatively early. To be fair, though, the adults have held up their end of the bickering, whining and fit-throwing nicely.

The show's tradition of taking contestants to far-flung lands and foreign cultures was severely clipped by the presence of kids, who the producers likely feared would have trouble crossing international borders, not to mention the risk of little Rolly Weaver wandering off into the slums of Cairo.

So instead, we were treated to what amounted to a travelogue of the United States, with only the briefest sojourns to Panama, Costa Rica and Canada.

To all appearances, the race will end tonight on Canuck soil, unless the final three families quickly blast back to the U.S. after manoeuvring around Toronto and Montreal.

Still in the running for the $1 million US prize are the Weavers, the Linz family (three brothers and one long-suffering sister) and the Bransen family (dad and three twenty-something daughters.)

We know the families ride jet boats up the Niagara Gorge, race through Pearson International Airport to catch a flight, try their hands at curling and search the bleachers at Montreal's Olympic Stadium, for starters.

We were hoping for a finish line at the base of the CN Tower or some such, but given the logical order of the events shown in the preview for tonight's episode, the checkered flag looks more likely to be waved at a Quebec locale.

Frankly, it won't be a moment too soon. Although things have picked up a little in the last few episodes, thanks in no small part to the fact the wonderfully grating Weavers are still in the running, the buzz surrounding this eighth instalment of the race has been the lowest since the series began.

Why? Well, there was the aforementioned lack of country-hopping. Part of the reason we tune into this show is to see places that we'll likely never be able to afford to visit, or haven't even heard of. Old Faithful is nifty and all, but come on.

The plethora of players didn't help either. Instead of the standard 11 teams of two, we had 10 families of four. While some clans were able to make an early mark (we still miss you, Mama Paolo), others were lost in the shuffle. Can you name the members of the Rogers or Black families or even remember what they looked like? Probably not.

CBS has confirmed the next season of The Amazing Race, already filmed and due to air early next year, will revert to traditional teams of two.

Tonight's finale is likely to come down to the Linzes and Bransens, the two strongest teams. A mix of luck and hard work has seen the Weavers survive longer than anyone imagined possible, though, so they shouldn't be counted out.

They can't win, of course, because they've been painted as the kooky villains of this piece all along.

But hopefully, they'll make tonight's two-hour season capper a little more interesting.

Goodness knows we deserve it.

IF YOU WATCH

http://lfpress.ca/newsstand/Today/Entertainment/2005/12/13/1350443-sun.html
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on December 14, 2005, 12:59:02 PM
Cincinnati Siblings To Split ‘Amazing Race’ Prize With Family

http://www.whiotv.com/entertainment/5533417/detail.html
Title: Locals fall short in not-so-amazing 'Race'
Post by: puddin on December 14, 2005, 01:00:31 PM
Locals fall short in not-so-amazing 'Race'


December 14, 2005

BY DOUG ELFMAN TELEVISION CRITIC


A Park Ridge, Ill., family lost in the finale of the game show "The Amazing Race 8," Tuesday night, blowing a shot at $1 million.

The Bransens -- a 51-year-old father and three daughters -- got beat in the 25-day physical challenge by the Linz family, four sports-playing siblings from Cincinnati whose ages were 19 to 24.

The Bransens began the final episode in first place, with a few minutes' lead over two families. But the Bransens soon fell behind by picking a slow plane ride from Montana to Montreal during one bland challenge or another. They regained the lead later but couldn't hold on.

Previous "Race" seasons have been acclaimed by fans and critics. But not this one.

A contest involving shoes?



The show's tasks were stupid. Tuesday, a family had to go to a shoe store, select a shoe, and find a woman whose foot fit the shoe. They had to ride on a speed boat. It was all very pedestrian.

The grumpy nature of the show brought out the worst in families. When the Bransen daughters gave their dad, Walter, grief about lagging in one chore, show producers ran sound bites of him saying, "Oh shut up," and "I'm gonna kick somebody's ass."

Among disgruntled "Race" fans are Steve Meitz and Dave Cottingham, who were Chicago air traffic controllers when they entered "Amazing Race 4" and lost. On Sunday, they co-wrote on a "Race" fan Web site called Tarflies.com that the "crappy" "Family Edition" "sucks," because it was less demanding than earlier "Races."

Trash-talking



They wrote that family "teams had to dress in costumes and have their pictures taken," whereas on an earlier season of "Race," "teams had to dress in costume and carry 500 (kilograms) of cheese."

My own viewing frustration is "Family Edition" was insipid and annoying. Contestants complained about each other, to each other, and about other families. A few families bumped flesh in an airport on Tuesday's show, and started trash-talking, saying they sucked, and they hated each other.

What's worse, the show claimed to reward smarts and physical prowess, but teams were unjustly forced to be in virtual ties during the finale. How so?

Another area family lost



For the first hour-plus, the teams raced like mad through obstacles to get to a stadium. But after the stadium, they were essentially forced to wait for airline flights to Toronto that departed at about the exact same time. That negated almost all their hard work.

If that doesn't sound unfair enough, on one week's show another Illinois family, the Godlewski sisters from Des Plaines, went from first place to last place after a CBS-provided car ran out of battery power. They were eliminated.

The whole experience of the show should be questioned. If you never watched, this is what you missed: cameras followed bellyachers who ran, drove and rode to 50 cities where they did little things, like rolling logs. Fast-paced music went pow with fortes and cymbal crashes. It was insufferable.

The only good minute of the finale came at the end, when families said nice things, finally. A Bransen sister said of her father, "We wouldn't have made it through this without him." Cue music. Cue tears. Cue cancellation. Please.


http://www.suntimes.com/output/entertainment/cst-nws-elf14.html




Title: Sinker finale for CBS's 'Amazing Race'
Post by: puddin on December 14, 2005, 01:02:48 PM
Sinker finale for


Family funk? Drops 31 percent from last season.

By Diego Vasquez
Dec 14, 2005


Adding celebrity couples to CBS’s “The Amazing Race” worked splendidly last season, spurring big ratings. Adding families this year had quite the opposite effect.
 
Last night’s two-hour season finale of “The Amazing Race: Family Edition” averaged a 4.6 overnight rating among viewers 18-49, down 31 percent versus the 6.7 overnight rating season seven’s finale earned last spring.
 
Last season “Race,” which had been on the rise since summer 2004, featured “Survivor’s” Rob and Amber, and viewership grew as the season progressed, with viewers tuning in to see if the dynamic duo could be defeated. They were bumped out in the season finale.

This year “Race” played with the formula again, sending family teams of four people trotting around the globe instead of the usual two. But this time the result was a bust.
 
“Family Edition” averaged a 4.2 overnight rating among 18-49s through 11 episodes this season, off 21 percent versus the Rob and Amber season.
 
“Family Edition” was also off compared to the last non-Rob and Amber season of “Race.” Last night’s 4.6 overnight for the finale was down 12 percent versus a 5.2 for season six’s finale last fall.
 
Viewers never warmed to the family format, with one common complaint being the challenges weren’t as exciting as past editions of “Race.” People also did not like having kids on the show, a frequent gripe about reality TV.
 
Last night’s episode was the highest-rated of the season, and up 24 percent from the 3.7 overnight rating the show had averaged over its previous three episodes.
 
It also helped CBS finish first for the night among 18-49s, coming in with a 4.5 average rating and a 12 share. Fox finished second at 4.0/11, NBC third at 3.4/9, ABC fourth at 3.0/8, and UPN and the WB tied for fifth at 1.2/3.
 
CBS started the night in the lead with a 4.2 average rating during the 8 p.m. hour for “NCIS.” NBC was second that hour with a 3.1 for the first hour of a 90-minute “Fear Factor” and ABC third with a 3.0 average for the comedies “According to Jim” (3.0) and “Hope & Faith” (2.9).
 
At 9 p.m. Fox took the lead with a 5.2 rating for “House,” the highest-rated hour of the night in the demo. CBS was second with a 4.2 for the first hour of the “Race” finale and NBC third with a 3.6 for the last half hour of “Fear Factor” (4.1) and a repeat of “My Name is Earl” (3.0).
 
CBS regained the lead during the 10 p.m. hour with a 5.1 average for the second half of “Race.” NBC took second with a 3.6 for a “Law & Order: SVU” rerun and ABC third with a 3.1 for an original “Boston Legal.”
 
Among households, CBS led the night with an 8.3 average rating and a 13 share. Fox was second at 6.9/11, NBC third at 6.0/9, ABC fourth at 5.9/9, UPN fifth at 2.1/3 and the WB sixth at 2.0/3.

http://medialifemagazine.com/artman/publish/article_1852.asp
Title: CBS Wins With Race; House Is Top Show
Post by: puddin on December 14, 2005, 01:03:24 PM
CBS Wins With Race; House Is Top Show

 
By John Eggerton -- Broadcasting & Cable, 12/14/2005 11:35:00 AM

CBS won the 18-49 demo Tuesday in the Nielsen overnight ratings with a 4.5 rating/12 share for drama NCIS and the two-hour finale of reality show Amazing Race, winning every half-hour except the two Amazing Race half-hours that went up against Fox's drama, House, the night's top-rated show at a 5.2/13 at 9-10.

 
http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/CA6291292.html?display=Breaking+News
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: Pedaler on December 20, 2005, 06:57:48 PM
http://www.tvguide.com/News/Insider/default.htm?cmsGuid={9BA48222-9C94-48A0-9BCB-A33293F5403B} (http://www.tvguide.com/News/Insider/default.htm?cmsGuid={9BA48222-9C94-48A0-9BCB-A33293F5403B})

Well, Megan.  Not all TAR detectives fell for all the decoys.   =]/

Quote
The Linz Kids are Race's First Family
by Rochell D. Thomas
The Linzes by Jeff Neira/CBS
The Amazing Race's Linz family
 

"I loved every minute of it!" Tommy Linz, 19, says of The Amazing Race: Family Edition, which sent him, his brothers Alex, 22, and Nick, 24, and sister Megan, 21, zipping through 50 cities in three countries in 25 days. TVGuide.com talked to the foursome the day after their long ride officially ended.

TVGuide.com: Congratulations! For a while there I thought God might help the Weavers win. If that had happened, what would you have done?
Nick Linz: We would have congratulated them! They were a strong team and very competitive.

TVGuide.com: Now that you've won $1 million, what will you do with it?
Nick: We will give half to our parents and split the other half between all seven kids. I think that we will be spending our money on paying back student loans and also, maybe, splurge a little.

TVGuide.com: In the first leg of the race, they edited out a task wherein you had to take the flag to the flag store. Were there other parts that were edited out?
Alex Linz: They did a good job putting the show together. Obviously, there are some things that are better off not being shown, like our car breaking down.

TVGuide.com: Speaking of that, did you have a hissy fit when it happened?
Nick: Not at all. The situation was completely out of our hands. Knowing we were being bumped back kind of stunk, but there was nothing we could do about it.

TVGuide.com: A friend of mine saw a clue box this summer in Niagara Falls, but it was set up in a different location. Was part of that challenge cut out?
Tommy Linz: From what I understand, CBS and the producers set up decoys.
Megan Linz: You've seen the spoilers on the Internet. It's all a way to throw people off.

TVGuide.com: You got home in August. How did you manage to not say anything to your family for three months?
Nick: We signed a big fat contract that said if we did, we could be sued for a lot of money. You don't get any of your winnings.

TVGuide.com: So you put on a serious game face?
Alex: Seeing my parents almost every day was hard, especially at times when people were saying, "I know you guys want to say something." But I would just play it off. Every day it got easier not to say anything.
Meg: At school, our friends would hassle me and Tommy. I would just say "I don't know" and drop it.

TVGuide.com: What was that crash with Rolly about?
Alex: We were both racing to the counter and I lost my balance. They edited that part to make it seem bigger than it was. It was not a big deal.

TVGuide.com: So Meg, when they showed you saying, "It's getting personal," what were you talking about?
Meg: It was just a comment that came out of my mouth after Mrs. Weaver said, "Don't touch my kid. Don't touch him!" I mean, is that really necessary? Do you really honestly think that my brother's trying to hurt your son? It wasn't necessary. But then again, in the heat of the moment, I made a comment that wasn't necessary either.

TVGuide.com: How long did it really take to find the clue in Toronto's underground city?
Nick: Two hours. It took a lot of running around, backtracking and retracing our steps.

TVGuide.com: It must have taken longer to find the box in the stadium. The Weavers' mother went to sleep!
Meg: It took every team close to five hours to find that box.
Nick: Even longer.
Alex: If we could pick the hardest task on the whole race, it's got to be that one. The clue boxes were so small, they blended in with the chairs. That's why, as soon as we found one, we took it.
Meg: It was a long day.

TVGuide.com: One of you called the Weavers "The Wicked Witch of the East and her three little monkeys." Who said it and what have you got against the Weavers?
Alex: I'll own up to that one. At times the Weavers seemed to rub us the wrong way. We made jokes about it, but in no way was it meant maliciously.

TVGuide.com: What did you guys think of the nickname the Weavers gave you — "G.I. Joes and G.I. Jane"?
Alex: We look like we're in shape, so I thought it was kind of cool. Clever.

TVGuide.com: You all made some whopper mistakes along the way, like forgetting to take a number for the helicopter ride and generally not reading clues carefully. If you were to give one of your team members an "Oops-That-Was-a-Doozy" trophy for the stupidest mistake, who would get it?
Nick: Bone's "I am 100 percent positive I see the flag" stunt he pulled at the CN Tower probably deserves it.

TVGuide.com: There seemed to be a lot of flirting going on between you and the Bransen daughters. They mooned you. You flashed them. Spill it: Who made a move on whom when Daddy Bransen wasn't around?
Nick: Daddy was always around, so what can you do?
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on December 20, 2005, 07:10:29 PM
:holidayC: Good interview , thanks Pedaler .
I think we (I?)  learned alot this season with the decoys and the crazy editing of the  repetitive voice dubbing as well as how to play with those URL codes ( thanks banzai   :winkC: ) .
We do NOT fall into the Bert's so called "Pundit " catagory  =]/ .
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on December 22, 2005, 01:45:46 AM
Multimedia
The following are various television show clips and other media clips relating to the Bondurant Kart Racing School. Enjoy them all and feel free to link your friends here to see them also!


 The Amazing Race Video Clips
Clips from Season 8 of the Amazing Race featuring the Bondurant SuperKart School
 
Official CBS airing
Local CBS Nightly News 
Local CBS Morning News 

( links at his site )
http://www.bondurantsuperkarts.com/multimedia.php?page=vid
Title: “We Were in the Race to Enjoy It”
Post by: puddin on December 22, 2005, 10:54:42 AM
“We Were in the Race to Enjoy It” – An Interview with the Amazing Race 8’s Linz Family
by Jenn Brasler -- 12/21/2005

 
RealityNewsOnline got the chance to interview the Linz family (right), the winners of this season of The Amazing Race. Read on to find out what they enjoyed most about the race (besides winning a million dollars), what they think of the Weavers, and the most important thing they think future racers should know.

RealityNewsOnline: Hi, Megan, Alex, Nick, and Tommy! Congratulations on your win! First of all, sorry if I ever called any of you guys by the wrong name.

I’ve heard that there are more Linzes back home. How did you all decide who would come on the race?

 The Linzes: The team was assembled virtually by default. The oldest brother, Matt, 27, was expecting his first child in August, so he was out. TJ, 26, lives in Chicago, so logistically it was difficult for him to audition with us. Tim, 16, had summer obligations that he couldn’t leave.

RNO: What did you think were your strengths and weaknesses?

The Linzes: Our strengths were that we all had the mindset that we were in the race to enjoy it. The big prize was always in our mind, but more importantly, we wanted to have fun and not get bent out of shape over any mistakes that we had made. We quickly learned from our mistakes and improved our performance as a “team” with every new day. We all knew that we were giving our best, and if our best wasn’t good enough, then the million belonged to someone else. Another side of it is that luck plays a major role, so we kept that in mind as well, which kept our morale and level of enjoyment elevated.

Our weakness may have been our lack of a sole leader. We are all young adults who all want to have a say and make the “right” decisions. Although there were times when that didn’t happen, we kept it cool and moved on.

RNO: Did you think Megan would hinder you at all?

The Linzes: We know that Megan has a big heart and wouldn’t let her brothers down. She kept up with us and showed many people that the girls can run with the boys.

RNO: Most people I’ve spoken to think that you all should have received a time credit after the incident with your battery being drained. What do you think?

The Linzes: It definitely was a bummer when that happened because you don’t know if it means the end of the race for us. We took it in stride, though, and made the best of being stuck in the desert. We ran the race, though, knowing that production does the best they can to provide good equipment. It’s part of the race, though, just as flat tires, bad directions could be given, or slow taxi drivers. You deal with it.

RNO: What was each person’s favorite moment or experience on the race?

Nick: The Moab Desert was my favorite location. I enjoyed the rugged terrain and the opportunity to rappel. Of course, my face plant on the ski slope was enjoyable also.

Alex: I think driving through Montana and seeing how open and beautiful the landscape of our country was.

Megan: My favorite or most memorable time on the race was flying the plane in a 360 loop. I was terrified of flying and heights and this task really made me overcome those fears really quick. I really have an ex-boyfriend to thank whom is a pilot and kind of taught me how to fly a plane.

RNO: Who did you see as your toughest competition?

Megan: I think I can speak for my whole team when I say that all the teams on this race were truly tough competitors. We really enjoyed running this race with all of them. But to really choose one, I would have to say the Bransens were our toughest; they brought to this race so much heart and determination and we really say that in Papa Wally. I would run a race with that family any day.

We knew going into the race that anybody has a shot at the million dollars. The Aiellos were a group that we thought would be strong in that they had four grown men to put up a fight. A large part of the race is luck, and anything could happen. With that in mind, it goes back to why any one of the teams could be considered the strongest.

RNO: Is there anything you would have done differently on the race?

The Linzes: We all agreed that we overpacked. Most important piece of information for all future racers: pack plenty of undergarments and minimal outerwear change of clothes. You can get away with two pairs of pants and a few
RNO: You all seemed to be mostly optimistic and energetic throughout the experience. Did you go in with a certain attitude?

The Linzes: This was the chance of a lifetime. We knew that we wanted to make the most of our opportunity given to us. We knew it was going to be stressful at times, but we knew to keep a clear head and stay positive if things didn’t go our way. Having fun and taking it all in was the goal from the start.

RNO: Did anyone show him- or herself to be a leader on the team?

The Linzes: No one could be the stand-out leader for our team. All of us participated and included great ideas to get us to where we went. I think the race gave each of us the opportunity to see that we were all leaders in our own right.

RNO: Here’s your chance – what do you want to say about the Weavers?

The Linzes: The Weavers may have caught a bad break with being depicted as the villains of the race, but they are not bad people. I think they simply chose to run a different kind of race and not be as sociable with the others as we may have expected. Their attitudes caught us off-guard at times.

RNO: Have your family dynamics changed since the race?

The Linzes: No, in that we still are the same close-knit family we went into it. The jokes and banter amongst us is still the same. It was just a great thing to have done with our siblings and share the experience and winnings with the rest of the family who weren’t on the show.

RNO: What are your plans for the future?

The Linzes: Plan now is to enjoy our prizes and our “15 minutes.” After we split the money as we said we would (with the rest of the family) there isn’t much left to each individual, so no big purchases in the plans. Invest, invest, invest!

RNO: What do you want to say to all of your fans and the people who watched you on the race?

The Linzes: Thanks for watching! Although the race format was different from past seasons, hopefully the excitement and suspense of each episode was there. We had the privilege of visiting amazing locations in this great country of ours, and we hope that our journey will prompt others to make a very affordable trip to cities like the ones we visited. You don’t have to leave your country to go outside of your “bubble.”

Megan: To all those people and fans that watched the race, thank you so much for all your support and love for Cincinnati. “Who Dey” and go BENGALS! We really have enjoyed every minute back at home and with our friends and family.

http://www.realitynewsonline.com/cgi-bin/ae.pl?mode=1&article=article5947.art&page=2
Title: Bransens recount their Amazing Race adventure
Post by: puddin on December 29, 2005, 10:55:55 AM
Bransens recount their Amazing Race adventure
BY KATHRYN SCHNEIDER
STAFF WRITER

"We were this close!" lamented Beth Bransen, holding her thumb and index finger about a centimeter apart.

And as millions of television viewers saw Dec. 13, one Park Ridge family was that close: to $1 million.

Wally Bransen and his three daughters, Beth, 26, Lauren, 22, and Lindsay, 20, recently finished in second place on Season Eight of CBS television's reality series, "Amazing Race." Teams of four family members raced around the world, with no money and a few personal belongings, competing to be the first to the finish line and a $1 million prize. Ten teams received clues in each leg of the race, pushing them through a grueling scramble to avoid being eliminated.

Missed by that much

In the final leg of the race, the Bransens finished second by about a minute and a half, just barely losing sight of first place. But their team did win free gasoline for life and two cars, which they plan to sell to split the proceeds. They also won $25,000 for placing second in the competition.

Wally and his daughters spent a month filming the show last summer. The four did everything from sifting through coffee beans and driving up a volcano in Costa Rica to re-enacting the Civil War in Pennsylvania. Other destinations included Panama and Yellowstone Park.

The idea to get on the show developed from Beth's interest in the previous season. Originally Beth and Lauren were going to apply for one of the show's two-person team series. But after some thought and family discussion, their unstoppable four-person team was formed.

The foursome made an audition tape last winter in their living room, and soon it was on its way to CBS headquarters.

"I said to them, 'You're not going to get on,'" Wally said. "But I said, 'I'll do it to get them off my back.'"

Just days later, Wally got the call that would turn the next few months of their lives into an endless stream of interviews, applications and tests.

"I was screaming all up and down my dorm hallway, 'We got a call back!'" Lindsay said.

The Bransens were picked from a pool of 20,000 teams from around the country to embark on an unbelievable journey - for which none of them was "fully prepared," Beth said.

Soon the four were ready to leave their mother, Judy, and brothers, Brian, 18, and Mark, 24, to set out on a month-long trip of a lifetime. But there was a catch: no one could know where they were. CBS asks contestants to keep details of the show under wraps until the series has been aired.

Where in the world...

"I had to lie all summer," Judy said. "Wally was supposed to be on an extended business trip in Europe...Beth was visiting a friend in California, and Lauren and Lindsay went with their aunt on a charity trip to Nicaragua."

And when they returned, Wally and his daughters had to keep their lips sealed until the season aired this fall. Judy watched her family run, drive and paddle around the world with millions of other American viewers- and she was on the edge of her seat along with them.

Family and friends flocked to the Bransen house each week to cheer on the Bransen team, at times overflowing the house with avid viewers. Wally's parents drove in from Indiana each week to share in what the Wally called the year-long "centerpiece of our lives."

The Bransen daughters were also quite nervous once the show started airing on CBS, they said. They had no idea how the show would be edited, or what they would look like on TV.

Lauren was mortified when an episode showed her mooning another team after a long-running joke with the race's eventual winners, members of the Linz family.

"I wasn't thinking they would ever put that on TV," she said. "I was screaming."

Just 'being us'

The reality show is known for airing family disagreements and team backbiting on national television. But the Bransens kept their cool, they said. Overall, the editing process was kind to them.

"For us, it was pretty accurate," Wally said.

The Bransen daughters agreed, saying the show "was just us being us."

The show also helped them re-live the ups and downs of the competition, they said. Sometimes it was frustrating to think about what they could have done better, Beth said. She spent several restless nights replaying the last leg of the race in her mind, she added.

Although many Park Ridge residents were following the Bransens' journey each week, the Bransens said they don't think the show has brought them too much celebrity. The family did an interview on the CBS Early Show, and people have recognized them as the three blonde-haired daughters who were on the Amazing Race with their dad, Wally.

"It's always about my dad," Beth said. "It's always, 'How's Wally? Go Wally!'"

The Bransens, who bonded with many other teams on the show, including the Godlewskis of Des Plaines, still keep up with the other families through e-mail.

And now it's back to the daily routine for the Bransens. The show has finished airing, and the weekly watching parties have dispersed.

Lindsay, a junior at Hope College in Michigan, is finishing a degree in social work. Lauren is an account manager in event marketing. Beth recently finished a masters degree in social work. The Bransen daughters hope to open their own boutique someday, possibly with the money they won on the Amazing Race.

But the Bransens assured curious friends and family they will never forget their experience, and the bond it built between them.

The Bransens are already enjoying their free gas cards and figuring out how much money they'll have to distribute among them after taxes.

"Wait. We have to pay the taxes?" Lindsay asked.

http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/ni/12-29-05-784958.html
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: Pedaler on December 29, 2005, 11:28:30 AM
Quote
Beth, 26, Lauren, 22, and Lindsay, 20
Quote
Brian, 18, and Mark, 24,

Yikes, All the children are two years apart?  I think Mom is the toughest one in that family   >*&

Does anyone know if TAR8Vet and his daughters won X dollars of gasoline every year for life or won Y gallons of gasoline every year for life?   Sure hope they have BP stations up in Chicagoland.

Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: Slowhatch on January 08, 2006, 07:40:20 PM
It's not TAR8 strictly, but it seems the best thread for this:
Google is getting into the on-demand tv game, and will be offering TAR, NBA games, and other stuff. Source (http://www.google.com/press/pressrel/video_marketplace.html)
(If they can keep the unit price down to a buck, I might be interested.)
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on January 09, 2006, 12:38:51 AM
I read 1.99 , Slowhatch   :beer:

Also for $1.99, people will be able to rent, for 24 hours, recent episodes of popular TV series from CBS like "NCIS," "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" and "The Amazing Race," Chane said. National Basketball Association games shown on TV can be downloaded for permanent purchase within one day of broadcast for US$3.95, he said.

source (http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Google_launches_desktop_package/0,2000061733,39231795,00.htm)
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on January 20, 2006, 01:51:54 PM
just a little blurb in this article (http://www.shns.com/shns/g_index2.cfm?action=detail&pk=LOVEMONKEY-TV-01-20-06) ~



Fans seemed to universally loathe CBS's mostly landlocked family edition of "The Amazing Race," and CBS's Tassler acknowledged it was a failed experiment.

"We tried something; I don't think we were particularly successful with it, but the interesting thing is sometimes you get criticized for not experimenting with a form," she said. "In this case we did. Our producers wanted to try something different, and we supported that."

"Race" host Phil Keoghan is also happy to get back to the traditional continent-hopping teams-of-two format when the show returns at the end of next month.

"For me the race is really about faces and places," he said, "and I felt if you take the places away, you do lose something."




and this article (http://www.edmontonsun.com/Entertainment/Weekend/2006/01/20/1403185-sun.html) ~

Amazing Race host Phil Keoghan said the recent "family edition" of the series was less than a success. "Race is all about faces and places," he said. "We had too many faces and not enough places."

Keoghan said starting the show by saying, "Teams must now travel 8,000 miles to South Africa," is always going to beat saying, "Teams must now travel eight blocks."

He's well aware of the show's enduring popularity in Canada. "No exaggeration. I must get 20 e-mails a week from Canadians saying, 'When are you going to let Canadians play on The Amazing Race?' "

Keoghan says the only solution is to "go to CTV and ask them to do their own version." Just don't let Ben Mulroney near it. (OK, Keoghan didn't say that, I did.)
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on January 24, 2006, 01:17:37 PM
RealityReel  (http://www.realityreel.com/index.php?file=article&sid=1621&page=2&POSTNUKESID=f9cca7bf58fef2d9c192ff328c29d0cf) has an interview with the Weavers , I haven't had a chance to read the whole thing ( its long ) but wanted to post this part of the interview (from page 7 & 8 )~



 As the first half of the final leg wound to a close, and Linda, Rolly, Rebecca and Rachel hopped onto a "golf cart" to search for the field entrance to Montreal's Parc Olympique, the Weaver's strong tailwind suddenly began to wilt and continued to dip and waver throughout the next day — which proved the Race's final hours. Even the fearless, unflagging Rolly finally cracked. Atop the 100 foot rigging of the Kajama, in the Toronto harbor, Rolly had a momentary — uncustomary — glitch. The flag he was to clip to his belt got away from him and tumbled down to the deck below. The Weavers fortunes sinking with it... It's a finale Linda Weaver won't soon forget:

"When we came to the stadium we'd already done a Roadblock and we'd already done a Detour, so I thought it would be a Pit Stop. So I was really, really sad that it wasn't a Pit Stop and then we were an hour and a half in front of everyone, and, so, you know, it was just hard. It was a mind-thing where you just had to slip out of it and not let it upset you. But it did frustrate me because I was just like, Oh, I thought we were going to be first and here we are leaving last...

"And I laid down {on that cot] because I was just thoroughly exhausted and we knew there was only one clue left and knew that we would eventually find it but I just couldn't keep going. So whether we found it right then or whether we found it an hour from then really didn't matter. Nobody else was going to get it. So I just took a nap because I couldn't keep walking. I had no more energy. So that's what happened there.

"Well, I know this is going to sound really silly but I didn't know that it was the final leg. I thought there was going to be one more non-elimination leg because I just didn't understand that. I was very surprised when it was the last leg and they said go to the final city. And I was kinda sad because we had worked so hard that day, you know the dominant day.

"And then the next day, see, we only got about an hour's sleep that night," remembers Linda, "... or an hour and a half; and we had only gotten two hours the night before. So we were really tired, I mean, we were very tired. And they didn't show it but the three kids fell asleep in the back seat and I was driving and I was navigating in Canada all by myself. And I had no clue where I was going and I had difficulty staying awake. We were just spent. So that's where our downfall was... our bodies just got exhausted; we couldn't keep up...

"On the very last day, the very last leg, near the falls, we had gotten into the line to get into the United States, we were headed into the United States line. And so we had to get out. They said, Don't go here, you can't return to the United States. I was just all mixed up because I was driving and the kids were sleeping and I was just too tired and I didn't know where we were going. I was in this long line with hundreds of cars and they said, You can't go. You have to turn around and stay in Canada. I was fixing to go through customs! So that took up a lot of time so I think we were a little bit behind everyone at the end because we were just... lost!

"Yeah. And we weren't really sad, you know, we weren't sad to come in third instead of second or first. I was really proud of the kids. And I think we did win, you know, we accomplished what we wanted to accomplish and we did our best and I mean that's all I can say. And... we didn't do the puzzle, we just ran on in!


Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on January 24, 2006, 11:53:35 PM
Wednesday, January 25, 2006
Catching up with the Linz family, The Amazing Race, 2005
 

Alex, Megan, Nick and Tommy Linz, from Anderson Township, won The Amazing Race and won a $1 million prize last month. The Linz kids surprised their parents, Tom and Terri, by giving half to them and sharing the remainder with their other three brothers, who were not on the show.

ALEX
WHY DO YOU THINK THEY PICKED YOU?

I think when you see my family together we all are usually in good spirits and always laughing with each other. We seem to get along even from a distance, and I think it's because we're always having a good time together.

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST TV MOMENT?

I really don't think there was a time when I wished they hadn't shown something. It is what it was. I don't usually carry regrets with me.

WAS IT LIFE-CHANGING?

I don't feel it was life-changing. It was life-affirming and it reaffirmed things I knew to be true, like enjoying life and meeting new people and taking advantage of opportunities.

WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW?

I'm working full-time at Mercy Anderson, and I will have to make some choices with my career path soon. I'm planning on going back to school for a master's degree or medical school or something in health care. I haven't pinpointed that yet. I work patient care. I do everything nurses do except I don't give drugs. I dress wounds, do EKGs, take blood pressure and temperature.

WHAT'S YOUR ADVICE TO OTHERS WHO'D LIKE TO BE ON A REALITY SHOW?

If they're trying to be on one, just be yourself and enjoy the opportunity. At least apply and have fun with it, but don't be over-hopeful. There are a lot of people that try out, and if you're not picked, it doesn't matter.

MEGAN
WHY DO YOU THINK THEY PICKED YOU?

It's really weird: My mom and I were shopping in the airport, and the casting director approached my brothers. You could say that we look like that all-American family. Aside from that, when we sent in our video we showed we could have a good time together, and I think they wanted to show that families can get along and put aside the bickering and stress.

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST TV MOMENT?

My worst personally was when we were doing the helicopter and I got extremely frustrated and it was due to production. Thank God they didn't show my whole tantrum because I threw quite a tantrum.

WAS IT LIFE-CHANGING?

This experience was definitely life-changing. I learned a lot about myself, and I learned I need to have more patience. I don't have a short fuse or anything, but when things don't go my way I need to sit back and say "OK, well, there's nothing I can do about it, just let it go."

WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW?

I'm working at my dad's business, Tripack. I'm taking some time off school and working for the time being. Hopefully I'll find a permanent job in event planning. I was going to school for that, and maybe this exposure will help me get my name out there.

WHAT'S YOUR ADVICE TO OTHERS WHO'D LIKE TO BE ON A REALITY SHOW?

The only advice I can give is be yourself. Show them how outgoing you are. Don't try to be somebody you're not, because it will come back.

NICK
WHY DO YOU THINK THEY PICKED YOU?

I think my family shares a common trait in making the most of any situation. We made it clear to the casting group that we found an opportunity to travel together (as a family) through an experience that would be the "chance of a lifetime."

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST TV MOMENT?

My personal worst moment was falling behind the Bransen team while on the golf course searching for the golf balls. Who would have thought to look in the cup? Goes to show that some of us are not prone to finding our ball there!

WAS IT LIFE-CHANGING?

The Race was something I will never forget because it was an experience that proved to me that we as a family can work together as a "team." We can accomplish many things without letting the usual family squabbles get in the way of the overall objective.

WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW?

Work! Work! Work! It's back to the grinding stone for me. The company I work for has recently relocated to Cincinnati and we are trying to settle into a new building and surroundings.

WHAT'S YOUR ADVICE TO OTHERS WHO'D LIKE TO BE ON A REALITY SHOW?

I have never been a big reality TV fan, but I found that The Amazing Race was an exception. This show provides the opportunity to travel to unbelievable places and see things that you would normally never have the opportunity to see in a lifetime.

TOMMY AKA "BONE"
WHY DO YOU THINK THEY PICKED YOU?

I would have to say they picked us because we're very loud, we're outgoing and the way we interact with one another to an outsider is often funny. We always cracked up and were always smiling, so I think it was that reason.

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST TV MOMENT?

For me, people would say me fighting in the buggy was the worst. Everybody thought it was kind of embarrassing, but I just thought it was funny. Some people might have thought if they didn't know me that it was inappropriate, but whatever.

WAS IT LIFE-CHANGING?

I wouldn't say it was life-changing, but it was definitely another chapter in part of my life. It just reassured me that me and my family and siblings are very close and we have a very good family bond.

WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW?

I'm back at Miami (University). I still hold my job at Skippers, where I am cook. Nothing has really changed, I'm just trying to get back to reality.

WHAT'S YOUR ADVICE TO OTHERS WHO'D LIKE TO BE ON A REALITY SHOW?

Never quit trying. If it doesn't happen once, don't give up. Just make as many tapes as you can. Make them creative and cheesy. Ours was really cheesy. And just have fun with it.

http://www.cinweekly.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060125/COV/601250319/1076
Title: Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
Post by: puddin on January 28, 2006, 01:21:05 PM
The amazing Linz kids
By Eileen Connelly, OSU

ST. FRANCIS DE SALES DEANERY — The Linz siblings of Anderson Township, who emerged as the winners of the CBS series "The Amazing Race" on Dec. 13 can credit a Catholic school background with their knowledge of geography.

Nick, 25, Alex, 23, Megan, 21, and Tommy, 20, were the first team to cross the finish line near Niagara Falls, netting a $1 million prize.

The Linzes were on a family trip to Cancun during the Christmas holidays in 2004 when they were approached by a CBS casting director and asked to audition for the show.

 
Traci Van Dorselaer 
"The Amazing Race" winners pose with Brother of the Poor of St. Francis Ed Kesler, assistant principal at IHM. Pictured with him from left are Nick, Megan, Tommy and Alex Linz.
"We’d always joked that we’d never do reality TV, but the ‘Amazing Race’ was different," recalled Megan, a 2003 graduate of St. Ursula Academy and now a student at Miami University. "It seemed so real and so fun."
This season of "The Amazing Race" was the show’s first "family edition" with 10 four-person teams. The families raced from New York City to New Orleans and on to South America. They then drove from Arizona through Utah to Wyoming and Montana before flying to Montreal. From there, it was another drive to Toronto and a thrilling finale at Niagara Falls.

From the start of the race, said Alex, a 2000 graduate of St. Xavier High School who currently works as an emergency department technician at Mercy Hospital Anderson, "we didn’t really have a strategy, because we didn’t really see it as a competition. It more of an opportunity to have fun, to have an adventure. We couldn’t strategize because you never knew what you were going to be asked to do next."

"We did decide that we were going to try not to fight and to keep the bickering at minimum," added his sister. "We just wanted to play the game the best we could and do it for the experience, not the prize. The most important thing is that we were ourselves the entire time. We never had to change who we are. We stuck to the values our parents taught us."

While Megan is close to her brothers and is a self-admitted tomboy, she said it was hard being the only girl on the team. "I can run with the boys for sure, but I can still be sensitive."

Both she and her brother say the experience opened their eyes to different cultures, taught them patience and the importance of teamwork. "It also reinforced what I already knew — that I have a great family," Alex said.

Since the show’s finale, the Linz siblings have been busy with interviews and public appearances, including a visit Immaculate Heart of Mary School, where they all attended grade school. They received an enthusiastic welcome from the faculty and students as they recounted some of their experiences.

Alex credited the education they received and the values they learned at IHM with helping them to win the competition. "Our teachers at IHM always taught us to use teamwork," he said. "They always encouraged us and were role models. I owe the person that I am today to them."

"I was fortunate enough to have taught all the Linz children," said Brother of St. Francis of the Poor Ed Kesler, assistant principal at IHM. "While here, they all displayed the team spirit and quick thinking that was evident during the ‘Amazing Race’ challenge. We are so proud of the entire Linz family. What a blessing it is as a Catholic educator to see such strong character and deep faith revealed by your students in such a public way."

That character was demonstrated when the LInz siblings announced on national television that their prize money would be shared with their family.

Half will go to their parents, Tom and Terri Linz, and the rest will be split seven ways among the four race participants and their three brothers who did not appear on the show.

"The money doesn’t equate to what our parents have done for us," Alex explained, "and we wanted our siblings to know that we wish they could have been there."
http://www.catholiccincinnati.org/tct/jan2706/012706linzfamily.html