Author Topic: TAR 8 - On-line Articles  (Read 28804 times)

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Offline puddin

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Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
« Reply #125 on: December 20, 2005, 07:10:29 PM »
:holidayC: Good interview , thanks Pedaler .
I think we (I?)  learned alot this season with the decoys and the crazy editing of the  repetitive voice dubbing as well as how to play with those URL codes ( thanks banzai   :winkC: ) .
We do NOT fall into the Bert's so called "Pundit " catagory  =]/ .


Offline puddin

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Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
« Reply #126 on: December 22, 2005, 01:45:46 AM »
Multimedia
The following are various television show clips and other media clips relating to the Bondurant Kart Racing School. Enjoy them all and feel free to link your friends here to see them also!


 The Amazing Race Video Clips
Clips from Season 8 of the Amazing Race featuring the Bondurant SuperKart School
 
Official CBS airing
Local CBS Nightly News 
Local CBS Morning News 

( links at his site )
http://www.bondurantsuperkarts.com/multimedia.php?page=vid

Offline puddin

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“We Were in the Race to Enjoy It”
« Reply #127 on: December 22, 2005, 10:54:42 AM »
“We Were in the Race to Enjoy It” – An Interview with the Amazing Race 8’s Linz Family
by Jenn Brasler -- 12/21/2005

 
RealityNewsOnline got the chance to interview the Linz family (right), the winners of this season of The Amazing Race. Read on to find out what they enjoyed most about the race (besides winning a million dollars), what they think of the Weavers, and the most important thing they think future racers should know.

RealityNewsOnline: Hi, Megan, Alex, Nick, and Tommy! Congratulations on your win! First of all, sorry if I ever called any of you guys by the wrong name.

I’ve heard that there are more Linzes back home. How did you all decide who would come on the race?

 The Linzes: The team was assembled virtually by default. The oldest brother, Matt, 27, was expecting his first child in August, so he was out. TJ, 26, lives in Chicago, so logistically it was difficult for him to audition with us. Tim, 16, had summer obligations that he couldn’t leave.

RNO: What did you think were your strengths and weaknesses?

The Linzes: Our strengths were that we all had the mindset that we were in the race to enjoy it. The big prize was always in our mind, but more importantly, we wanted to have fun and not get bent out of shape over any mistakes that we had made. We quickly learned from our mistakes and improved our performance as a “team” with every new day. We all knew that we were giving our best, and if our best wasn’t good enough, then the million belonged to someone else. Another side of it is that luck plays a major role, so we kept that in mind as well, which kept our morale and level of enjoyment elevated.

Our weakness may have been our lack of a sole leader. We are all young adults who all want to have a say and make the “right” decisions. Although there were times when that didn’t happen, we kept it cool and moved on.

RNO: Did you think Megan would hinder you at all?

The Linzes: We know that Megan has a big heart and wouldn’t let her brothers down. She kept up with us and showed many people that the girls can run with the boys.

RNO: Most people I’ve spoken to think that you all should have received a time credit after the incident with your battery being drained. What do you think?

The Linzes: It definitely was a bummer when that happened because you don’t know if it means the end of the race for us. We took it in stride, though, and made the best of being stuck in the desert. We ran the race, though, knowing that production does the best they can to provide good equipment. It’s part of the race, though, just as flat tires, bad directions could be given, or slow taxi drivers. You deal with it.

RNO: What was each person’s favorite moment or experience on the race?

Nick: The Moab Desert was my favorite location. I enjoyed the rugged terrain and the opportunity to rappel. Of course, my face plant on the ski slope was enjoyable also.

Alex: I think driving through Montana and seeing how open and beautiful the landscape of our country was.

Megan: My favorite or most memorable time on the race was flying the plane in a 360 loop. I was terrified of flying and heights and this task really made me overcome those fears really quick. I really have an ex-boyfriend to thank whom is a pilot and kind of taught me how to fly a plane.

RNO: Who did you see as your toughest competition?

Megan: I think I can speak for my whole team when I say that all the teams on this race were truly tough competitors. We really enjoyed running this race with all of them. But to really choose one, I would have to say the Bransens were our toughest; they brought to this race so much heart and determination and we really say that in Papa Wally. I would run a race with that family any day.

We knew going into the race that anybody has a shot at the million dollars. The Aiellos were a group that we thought would be strong in that they had four grown men to put up a fight. A large part of the race is luck, and anything could happen. With that in mind, it goes back to why any one of the teams could be considered the strongest.

RNO: Is there anything you would have done differently on the race?

The Linzes: We all agreed that we overpacked. Most important piece of information for all future racers: pack plenty of undergarments and minimal outerwear change of clothes. You can get away with two pairs of pants and a few
RNO: You all seemed to be mostly optimistic and energetic throughout the experience. Did you go in with a certain attitude?

The Linzes: This was the chance of a lifetime. We knew that we wanted to make the most of our opportunity given to us. We knew it was going to be stressful at times, but we knew to keep a clear head and stay positive if things didn’t go our way. Having fun and taking it all in was the goal from the start.

RNO: Did anyone show him- or herself to be a leader on the team?

The Linzes: No one could be the stand-out leader for our team. All of us participated and included great ideas to get us to where we went. I think the race gave each of us the opportunity to see that we were all leaders in our own right.

RNO: Here’s your chance – what do you want to say about the Weavers?

The Linzes: The Weavers may have caught a bad break with being depicted as the villains of the race, but they are not bad people. I think they simply chose to run a different kind of race and not be as sociable with the others as we may have expected. Their attitudes caught us off-guard at times.

RNO: Have your family dynamics changed since the race?

The Linzes: No, in that we still are the same close-knit family we went into it. The jokes and banter amongst us is still the same. It was just a great thing to have done with our siblings and share the experience and winnings with the rest of the family who weren’t on the show.

RNO: What are your plans for the future?

The Linzes: Plan now is to enjoy our prizes and our “15 minutes.” After we split the money as we said we would (with the rest of the family) there isn’t much left to each individual, so no big purchases in the plans. Invest, invest, invest!

RNO: What do you want to say to all of your fans and the people who watched you on the race?

The Linzes: Thanks for watching! Although the race format was different from past seasons, hopefully the excitement and suspense of each episode was there. We had the privilege of visiting amazing locations in this great country of ours, and we hope that our journey will prompt others to make a very affordable trip to cities like the ones we visited. You don’t have to leave your country to go outside of your “bubble.”

Megan: To all those people and fans that watched the race, thank you so much for all your support and love for Cincinnati. “Who Dey” and go BENGALS! We really have enjoyed every minute back at home and with our friends and family.

http://www.realitynewsonline.com/cgi-bin/ae.pl?mode=1&article=article5947.art&page=2

Offline puddin

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Bransens recount their Amazing Race adventure
« Reply #128 on: December 29, 2005, 10:55:55 AM »
Bransens recount their Amazing Race adventure
BY KATHRYN SCHNEIDER
STAFF WRITER

"We were this close!" lamented Beth Bransen, holding her thumb and index finger about a centimeter apart.

And as millions of television viewers saw Dec. 13, one Park Ridge family was that close: to $1 million.

Wally Bransen and his three daughters, Beth, 26, Lauren, 22, and Lindsay, 20, recently finished in second place on Season Eight of CBS television's reality series, "Amazing Race." Teams of four family members raced around the world, with no money and a few personal belongings, competing to be the first to the finish line and a $1 million prize. Ten teams received clues in each leg of the race, pushing them through a grueling scramble to avoid being eliminated.

Missed by that much

In the final leg of the race, the Bransens finished second by about a minute and a half, just barely losing sight of first place. But their team did win free gasoline for life and two cars, which they plan to sell to split the proceeds. They also won $25,000 for placing second in the competition.

Wally and his daughters spent a month filming the show last summer. The four did everything from sifting through coffee beans and driving up a volcano in Costa Rica to re-enacting the Civil War in Pennsylvania. Other destinations included Panama and Yellowstone Park.

The idea to get on the show developed from Beth's interest in the previous season. Originally Beth and Lauren were going to apply for one of the show's two-person team series. But after some thought and family discussion, their unstoppable four-person team was formed.

The foursome made an audition tape last winter in their living room, and soon it was on its way to CBS headquarters.

"I said to them, 'You're not going to get on,'" Wally said. "But I said, 'I'll do it to get them off my back.'"

Just days later, Wally got the call that would turn the next few months of their lives into an endless stream of interviews, applications and tests.

"I was screaming all up and down my dorm hallway, 'We got a call back!'" Lindsay said.

The Bransens were picked from a pool of 20,000 teams from around the country to embark on an unbelievable journey - for which none of them was "fully prepared," Beth said.

Soon the four were ready to leave their mother, Judy, and brothers, Brian, 18, and Mark, 24, to set out on a month-long trip of a lifetime. But there was a catch: no one could know where they were. CBS asks contestants to keep details of the show under wraps until the series has been aired.

Where in the world...

"I had to lie all summer," Judy said. "Wally was supposed to be on an extended business trip in Europe...Beth was visiting a friend in California, and Lauren and Lindsay went with their aunt on a charity trip to Nicaragua."

And when they returned, Wally and his daughters had to keep their lips sealed until the season aired this fall. Judy watched her family run, drive and paddle around the world with millions of other American viewers- and she was on the edge of her seat along with them.

Family and friends flocked to the Bransen house each week to cheer on the Bransen team, at times overflowing the house with avid viewers. Wally's parents drove in from Indiana each week to share in what the Wally called the year-long "centerpiece of our lives."

The Bransen daughters were also quite nervous once the show started airing on CBS, they said. They had no idea how the show would be edited, or what they would look like on TV.

Lauren was mortified when an episode showed her mooning another team after a long-running joke with the race's eventual winners, members of the Linz family.

"I wasn't thinking they would ever put that on TV," she said. "I was screaming."

Just 'being us'

The reality show is known for airing family disagreements and team backbiting on national television. But the Bransens kept their cool, they said. Overall, the editing process was kind to them.

"For us, it was pretty accurate," Wally said.

The Bransen daughters agreed, saying the show "was just us being us."

The show also helped them re-live the ups and downs of the competition, they said. Sometimes it was frustrating to think about what they could have done better, Beth said. She spent several restless nights replaying the last leg of the race in her mind, she added.

Although many Park Ridge residents were following the Bransens' journey each week, the Bransens said they don't think the show has brought them too much celebrity. The family did an interview on the CBS Early Show, and people have recognized them as the three blonde-haired daughters who were on the Amazing Race with their dad, Wally.

"It's always about my dad," Beth said. "It's always, 'How's Wally? Go Wally!'"

The Bransens, who bonded with many other teams on the show, including the Godlewskis of Des Plaines, still keep up with the other families through e-mail.

And now it's back to the daily routine for the Bransens. The show has finished airing, and the weekly watching parties have dispersed.

Lindsay, a junior at Hope College in Michigan, is finishing a degree in social work. Lauren is an account manager in event marketing. Beth recently finished a masters degree in social work. The Bransen daughters hope to open their own boutique someday, possibly with the money they won on the Amazing Race.

But the Bransens assured curious friends and family they will never forget their experience, and the bond it built between them.

The Bransens are already enjoying their free gas cards and figuring out how much money they'll have to distribute among them after taxes.

"Wait. We have to pay the taxes?" Lindsay asked.

http://www.pioneerlocal.com/cgi-bin/ppo-story/localnews/current/ni/12-29-05-784958.html

Offline Pedaler

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Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
« Reply #129 on: December 29, 2005, 11:28:30 AM »
Quote
Beth, 26, Lauren, 22, and Lindsay, 20
Quote
Brian, 18, and Mark, 24,

Yikes, All the children are two years apart?  I think Mom is the toughest one in that family   >*&

Does anyone know if TAR8Vet and his daughters won X dollars of gasoline every year for life or won Y gallons of gasoline every year for life?   Sure hope they have BP stations up in Chicagoland.



Offline Slowhatch

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Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
« Reply #130 on: January 08, 2006, 07:40:20 PM »
It's not TAR8 strictly, but it seems the best thread for this:
Google is getting into the on-demand tv game, and will be offering TAR, NBA games, and other stuff. Source
(If they can keep the unit price down to a buck, I might be interested.)

Offline puddin

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Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
« Reply #131 on: January 09, 2006, 12:38:51 AM »
I read 1.99 , Slowhatch   :beer:

Also for $1.99, people will be able to rent, for 24 hours, recent episodes of popular TV series from CBS like "NCIS," "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" and "The Amazing Race," Chane said. National Basketball Association games shown on TV can be downloaded for permanent purchase within one day of broadcast for US$3.95, he said.

source

Offline puddin

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Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
« Reply #132 on: January 20, 2006, 01:51:54 PM »
just a little blurb in this article ~



Fans seemed to universally loathe CBS's mostly landlocked family edition of "The Amazing Race," and CBS's Tassler acknowledged it was a failed experiment.

"We tried something; I don't think we were particularly successful with it, but the interesting thing is sometimes you get criticized for not experimenting with a form," she said. "In this case we did. Our producers wanted to try something different, and we supported that."

"Race" host Phil Keoghan is also happy to get back to the traditional continent-hopping teams-of-two format when the show returns at the end of next month.

"For me the race is really about faces and places," he said, "and I felt if you take the places away, you do lose something."




and this article ~

Amazing Race host Phil Keoghan said the recent "family edition" of the series was less than a success. "Race is all about faces and places," he said. "We had too many faces and not enough places."

Keoghan said starting the show by saying, "Teams must now travel 8,000 miles to South Africa," is always going to beat saying, "Teams must now travel eight blocks."

He's well aware of the show's enduring popularity in Canada. "No exaggeration. I must get 20 e-mails a week from Canadians saying, 'When are you going to let Canadians play on The Amazing Race?' "

Keoghan says the only solution is to "go to CTV and ask them to do their own version." Just don't let Ben Mulroney near it. (OK, Keoghan didn't say that, I did.)

Offline puddin

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Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
« Reply #133 on: January 24, 2006, 01:17:37 PM »
RealityReel has an interview with the Weavers , I haven't had a chance to read the whole thing ( its long ) but wanted to post this part of the interview (from page 7 & 8 )~



 As the first half of the final leg wound to a close, and Linda, Rolly, Rebecca and Rachel hopped onto a "golf cart" to search for the field entrance to Montreal's Parc Olympique, the Weaver's strong tailwind suddenly began to wilt and continued to dip and waver throughout the next day — which proved the Race's final hours. Even the fearless, unflagging Rolly finally cracked. Atop the 100 foot rigging of the Kajama, in the Toronto harbor, Rolly had a momentary — uncustomary — glitch. The flag he was to clip to his belt got away from him and tumbled down to the deck below. The Weavers fortunes sinking with it... It's a finale Linda Weaver won't soon forget:

"When we came to the stadium we'd already done a Roadblock and we'd already done a Detour, so I thought it would be a Pit Stop. So I was really, really sad that it wasn't a Pit Stop and then we were an hour and a half in front of everyone, and, so, you know, it was just hard. It was a mind-thing where you just had to slip out of it and not let it upset you. But it did frustrate me because I was just like, Oh, I thought we were going to be first and here we are leaving last...

"And I laid down {on that cot] because I was just thoroughly exhausted and we knew there was only one clue left and knew that we would eventually find it but I just couldn't keep going. So whether we found it right then or whether we found it an hour from then really didn't matter. Nobody else was going to get it. So I just took a nap because I couldn't keep walking. I had no more energy. So that's what happened there.

"Well, I know this is going to sound really silly but I didn't know that it was the final leg. I thought there was going to be one more non-elimination leg because I just didn't understand that. I was very surprised when it was the last leg and they said go to the final city. And I was kinda sad because we had worked so hard that day, you know the dominant day.

"And then the next day, see, we only got about an hour's sleep that night," remembers Linda, "... or an hour and a half; and we had only gotten two hours the night before. So we were really tired, I mean, we were very tired. And they didn't show it but the three kids fell asleep in the back seat and I was driving and I was navigating in Canada all by myself. And I had no clue where I was going and I had difficulty staying awake. We were just spent. So that's where our downfall was... our bodies just got exhausted; we couldn't keep up...

"On the very last day, the very last leg, near the falls, we had gotten into the line to get into the United States, we were headed into the United States line. And so we had to get out. They said, Don't go here, you can't return to the United States. I was just all mixed up because I was driving and the kids were sleeping and I was just too tired and I didn't know where we were going. I was in this long line with hundreds of cars and they said, You can't go. You have to turn around and stay in Canada. I was fixing to go through customs! So that took up a lot of time so I think we were a little bit behind everyone at the end because we were just... lost!

"Yeah. And we weren't really sad, you know, we weren't sad to come in third instead of second or first. I was really proud of the kids. And I think we did win, you know, we accomplished what we wanted to accomplish and we did our best and I mean that's all I can say. And... we didn't do the puzzle, we just ran on in!



Offline puddin

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Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
« Reply #134 on: January 24, 2006, 11:53:35 PM »
Wednesday, January 25, 2006
Catching up with the Linz family, The Amazing Race, 2005
 

Alex, Megan, Nick and Tommy Linz, from Anderson Township, won The Amazing Race and won a $1 million prize last month. The Linz kids surprised their parents, Tom and Terri, by giving half to them and sharing the remainder with their other three brothers, who were not on the show.

ALEX
WHY DO YOU THINK THEY PICKED YOU?

I think when you see my family together we all are usually in good spirits and always laughing with each other. We seem to get along even from a distance, and I think it's because we're always having a good time together.

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST TV MOMENT?

I really don't think there was a time when I wished they hadn't shown something. It is what it was. I don't usually carry regrets with me.

WAS IT LIFE-CHANGING?

I don't feel it was life-changing. It was life-affirming and it reaffirmed things I knew to be true, like enjoying life and meeting new people and taking advantage of opportunities.

WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW?

I'm working full-time at Mercy Anderson, and I will have to make some choices with my career path soon. I'm planning on going back to school for a master's degree or medical school or something in health care. I haven't pinpointed that yet. I work patient care. I do everything nurses do except I don't give drugs. I dress wounds, do EKGs, take blood pressure and temperature.

WHAT'S YOUR ADVICE TO OTHERS WHO'D LIKE TO BE ON A REALITY SHOW?

If they're trying to be on one, just be yourself and enjoy the opportunity. At least apply and have fun with it, but don't be over-hopeful. There are a lot of people that try out, and if you're not picked, it doesn't matter.

MEGAN
WHY DO YOU THINK THEY PICKED YOU?

It's really weird: My mom and I were shopping in the airport, and the casting director approached my brothers. You could say that we look like that all-American family. Aside from that, when we sent in our video we showed we could have a good time together, and I think they wanted to show that families can get along and put aside the bickering and stress.

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST TV MOMENT?

My worst personally was when we were doing the helicopter and I got extremely frustrated and it was due to production. Thank God they didn't show my whole tantrum because I threw quite a tantrum.

WAS IT LIFE-CHANGING?

This experience was definitely life-changing. I learned a lot about myself, and I learned I need to have more patience. I don't have a short fuse or anything, but when things don't go my way I need to sit back and say "OK, well, there's nothing I can do about it, just let it go."

WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW?

I'm working at my dad's business, Tripack. I'm taking some time off school and working for the time being. Hopefully I'll find a permanent job in event planning. I was going to school for that, and maybe this exposure will help me get my name out there.

WHAT'S YOUR ADVICE TO OTHERS WHO'D LIKE TO BE ON A REALITY SHOW?

The only advice I can give is be yourself. Show them how outgoing you are. Don't try to be somebody you're not, because it will come back.

NICK
WHY DO YOU THINK THEY PICKED YOU?

I think my family shares a common trait in making the most of any situation. We made it clear to the casting group that we found an opportunity to travel together (as a family) through an experience that would be the "chance of a lifetime."

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST TV MOMENT?

My personal worst moment was falling behind the Bransen team while on the golf course searching for the golf balls. Who would have thought to look in the cup? Goes to show that some of us are not prone to finding our ball there!

WAS IT LIFE-CHANGING?

The Race was something I will never forget because it was an experience that proved to me that we as a family can work together as a "team." We can accomplish many things without letting the usual family squabbles get in the way of the overall objective.

WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW?

Work! Work! Work! It's back to the grinding stone for me. The company I work for has recently relocated to Cincinnati and we are trying to settle into a new building and surroundings.

WHAT'S YOUR ADVICE TO OTHERS WHO'D LIKE TO BE ON A REALITY SHOW?

I have never been a big reality TV fan, but I found that The Amazing Race was an exception. This show provides the opportunity to travel to unbelievable places and see things that you would normally never have the opportunity to see in a lifetime.

TOMMY AKA "BONE"
WHY DO YOU THINK THEY PICKED YOU?

I would have to say they picked us because we're very loud, we're outgoing and the way we interact with one another to an outsider is often funny. We always cracked up and were always smiling, so I think it was that reason.

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST TV MOMENT?

For me, people would say me fighting in the buggy was the worst. Everybody thought it was kind of embarrassing, but I just thought it was funny. Some people might have thought if they didn't know me that it was inappropriate, but whatever.

WAS IT LIFE-CHANGING?

I wouldn't say it was life-changing, but it was definitely another chapter in part of my life. It just reassured me that me and my family and siblings are very close and we have a very good family bond.

WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW?

I'm back at Miami (University). I still hold my job at Skippers, where I am cook. Nothing has really changed, I'm just trying to get back to reality.

WHAT'S YOUR ADVICE TO OTHERS WHO'D LIKE TO BE ON A REALITY SHOW?

Never quit trying. If it doesn't happen once, don't give up. Just make as many tapes as you can. Make them creative and cheesy. Ours was really cheesy. And just have fun with it.

http://www.cinweekly.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060125/COV/601250319/1076


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Re: TAR 8 - On-line Articles
« Reply #135 on: January 28, 2006, 01:21:05 PM »
The amazing Linz kids
By Eileen Connelly, OSU

ST. FRANCIS DE SALES DEANERY — The Linz siblings of Anderson Township, who emerged as the winners of the CBS series "The Amazing Race" on Dec. 13 can credit a Catholic school background with their knowledge of geography.

Nick, 25, Alex, 23, Megan, 21, and Tommy, 20, were the first team to cross the finish line near Niagara Falls, netting a $1 million prize.

The Linzes were on a family trip to Cancun during the Christmas holidays in 2004 when they were approached by a CBS casting director and asked to audition for the show.

 
Traci Van Dorselaer 
"The Amazing Race" winners pose with Brother of the Poor of St. Francis Ed Kesler, assistant principal at IHM. Pictured with him from left are Nick, Megan, Tommy and Alex Linz.
"We’d always joked that we’d never do reality TV, but the ‘Amazing Race’ was different," recalled Megan, a 2003 graduate of St. Ursula Academy and now a student at Miami University. "It seemed so real and so fun."
This season of "The Amazing Race" was the show’s first "family edition" with 10 four-person teams. The families raced from New York City to New Orleans and on to South America. They then drove from Arizona through Utah to Wyoming and Montana before flying to Montreal. From there, it was another drive to Toronto and a thrilling finale at Niagara Falls.

From the start of the race, said Alex, a 2000 graduate of St. Xavier High School who currently works as an emergency department technician at Mercy Hospital Anderson, "we didn’t really have a strategy, because we didn’t really see it as a competition. It more of an opportunity to have fun, to have an adventure. We couldn’t strategize because you never knew what you were going to be asked to do next."

"We did decide that we were going to try not to fight and to keep the bickering at minimum," added his sister. "We just wanted to play the game the best we could and do it for the experience, not the prize. The most important thing is that we were ourselves the entire time. We never had to change who we are. We stuck to the values our parents taught us."

While Megan is close to her brothers and is a self-admitted tomboy, she said it was hard being the only girl on the team. "I can run with the boys for sure, but I can still be sensitive."

Both she and her brother say the experience opened their eyes to different cultures, taught them patience and the importance of teamwork. "It also reinforced what I already knew — that I have a great family," Alex said.

Since the show’s finale, the Linz siblings have been busy with interviews and public appearances, including a visit Immaculate Heart of Mary School, where they all attended grade school. They received an enthusiastic welcome from the faculty and students as they recounted some of their experiences.

Alex credited the education they received and the values they learned at IHM with helping them to win the competition. "Our teachers at IHM always taught us to use teamwork," he said. "They always encouraged us and were role models. I owe the person that I am today to them."

"I was fortunate enough to have taught all the Linz children," said Brother of St. Francis of the Poor Ed Kesler, assistant principal at IHM. "While here, they all displayed the team spirit and quick thinking that was evident during the ‘Amazing Race’ challenge. We are so proud of the entire Linz family. What a blessing it is as a Catholic educator to see such strong character and deep faith revealed by your students in such a public way."

That character was demonstrated when the LInz siblings announced on national television that their prize money would be shared with their family.

Half will go to their parents, Tom and Terri Linz, and the rest will be split seven ways among the four race participants and their three brothers who did not appear on the show.

"The money doesn’t equate to what our parents have done for us," Alex explained, "and we wanted our siblings to know that we wish they could have been there."
http://www.catholiccincinnati.org/tct/jan2706/012706linzfamily.html


 

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